In Case You Missed It: Day In The Life at Aramark

Did you miss a day in the life at Aramark?  Click here for a recap!

Don’t forget to stop by their table at the Spring Job & Internship Fair 1/29!  RSVP here!

Follow us on Twitter @NYUWassEmployer for tweets on a day-in-the-life of employees at different organizations. A professional will take over our account for the day and give you live updates about the projects they work on, meetings they attend, and the culture of their office.

Secrets to Successful Networking: Building a Personal Brand

Secrets to Successful Networking: Building a Personal Brand

By Andy C. Ng (Wasserman Peer in Career)

 During one of the city’s frigid, torrential downpours, I found myself with an old friend at The Bean in the East Village – try their dirty chai latte, you’ll become an addict, I swear. Catching up about our winter breaks at home (much needed quality time with family, food and SLEEPING), the conversation naturally led its way back to school and our professional endeavors. Both my friend and I have founded our own respective social ventures: his tackling the hunger space, mine addressing yet another facet of educational inequality. The past two years have provided an enormous wealth of business plan competitions, recruiting and partnership development, but I was anxious to pick my friend’s brain about the perpetual hot topic of “networking.” He said networking is “just being a person,” or in layman’s terms, be who you are and have a conversation.

Networking seems easy on paper: attend an organized event (like the employer presentations held at Wasserman), make a nametag, and mingle with some folks. But the pressure of making a decent first impression and possibly landing an internship or job weighs heavy on your shoulders, your rapidly sweating hands, and your sanity. Making a coherent sentence all of the sudden is more difficult than landing on the right side of a curve in your Calc class. The issue is not simply being a good speaker, but rather it comes from a lack of a polished personal brand.

Public speaking is a big passion of mine, and my knack for it lies in this understanding: say what you believe and believe what you say. As college students we all are masters of “getting by” with our words, but imagine the power in really believing and supporting what you’re dishing out. When talking about yourself, the more you understand your past experiences, dreams and working style, the more beautiful a picture you can paint for others.

Here are my simple tips for building a personal brand:

1. Build Out + Learn Your Resume

  • Chances are you already have a resume, which is great! If you don’t (and even if you do, really) visit the Wasserman Center and sit with a Career Coach. Once you’ve done that, it’s time to study the most important document of your life (at least up until now). And not just the boring logistics of how much money you saved the company or how many volunteer hours you accumulated. As Simon Sinek preaches in his TED talk, people don’t care what you did – they care about why you did it. Think about your motivations, what you learned and how it’s influenced or continues to influence you. Approaching your resume in this light will give you valuable stories and insights that you can share with others.

2. Hashtag It

  • Not literally. Can you imagine #AndyNgNYU on all my profiles? But really, I’m talking about social media (the Internet in general) and how it’s actually useful. When you type your name into Google, many things might pop up. So why not put things into your own hands and populate the search with viable, honest presentations of your interests, personal story and work? You can design, write and post to a blog (like this one!), retweet and follow news of companies you admire on Twitter, and my absolute favorite, make an extremely detailed LinkedIn profile. Keep in mind that your brand follows you and exists everywhere. The more you update and post, the more chances you create for someone to notice.

3. Make a House of (Business) Cards

  • You have nothing worthy of putting a business card? Nonsense. One, you’re a NYU student which holds value on its own already. Other items you can list are positions or titles held on campus or current internships, fellowships and even scholarships. For instance, mine says I’m a Dalai Lama Fellow and a Gates Millennium Scholar. While most people might not know what these things are, they are nonetheless good starting points for conversation and elaboration. Something else you might want to consider putting on a card is your answer to the question, what are you? Are you an entrepreneur, a coder, an engineer, actor or writer? I have several of these “careers or roles” on my card and when listed, it’s a very direct way of expressing to employers (or whomever might have my card) what my likely skillset and interests are. A plus side to a card is that it’s also easy to carry around while still being professional.

4. Dress It Up

  • Wearing your personality is a possibility, even in the world of pantsuits and overpriced ties. When I first began networking, I always wore appropriate clothes with a pop of color (POC) whether it was my socks or a bowtie. Along with a firm handshake and a cute smile, this was my way of giving an awesome first impression. If color’s not your forte, no pressure – just make sure that your personal appearance is up to par. Being “put together” does not mean being average or drab. Your well-fitted clothes and confident body language should draw you compliments from everyone in the room.

If you still need some tips, make sure to check out Wasserman’s Attire for Successful Hire event later this month on Thursday, February 12th from 5-7 p.m. 

Attire for Successful Hire, co-sponsored by Macy’s!

Thursday, February 12th 5-7pm, Seating is first come, first serve basis! 

Prizes, food, AND networking!

Don’t let the wrong outfit cost you the job! Be sure to join our Peers in Careers team and representatives from Macy’s as they offer fashion advice and showcase clothing trends that will help inspire the confidence you need to land that job or internship. You will also learn to decode terms like “business casual,” and figure out how to add variety to your professional wardrobe. You can RSVP via CareerNet.

• All attendees will be entered into a FREE raffle

• First 50 attendees will receive a Macy’s Gift Bag

• View Appropriate attire for your job search, internship, and full-time wardrobe

• Mingle with Macy’s Executives and Recruiters

• Free Food and Drinks!

Remember that networking does take practice and that the more events you attend, the more comfortable you get. And with those events you should start testing out some of these tips and see which areas of your personal brand are useful and which ones need more work. Getting out of your comfort zone always feels weird at first, but when it comes to networking, the more you know yourself and your needs, the more prepared you’ll be to brand and share that with the right people who can help out.

Andy C. Ng

Andy C. Ng is a Gates Millennium Scholar and senior studying English, Urban Education and Social Entrepreneurship. In addition to being a Peer in Career, Andy is Chair of the Greek Alliance, an Undergraduate Admissions Ambassador and member of the CAS Senior Leadership Board. Outside of NYU, Andy is involved with projects at Google, Harry’s and Venture For America, having previously worked at JPMorgan Chase and his own startup, Student to Student.

Myths vs. Facts! The Truth About Landing a Job in Finance, Business, or Consulting

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Myths vs. Facts! Breaking down the common misconceptions, urban legends and false facts around landing a job in the Finance, Business, or Consulting industries.

Myth: Only business students can work on Wall Street.

Fact: Many liberal arts students have successful careers on Wall Street.  However, as a liberal arts student, you will need to build your professional skills, network, and experiences in your Sophomore and Junior years. Additional effort must be put forth to find mentors in the industry, and build connections that can lead to internships and full time opportunities.

Myth: Only investment banks and accounting firms recruit through On-Campus Recruitment.

Fact: OCR is open to employers from all industries.  Different industries have different recruiting timelines and strategies.  OCR is most successful for employers who have a larger number of internship or entry-level FT openings.  OCR is a common best practice, but it is not the only recruiting opportunity available to students. Employers can also post jobs to NYU CareerNet (outside of OCR), attend panels, host a site visits, meet-ups, recruiter-in-residences, etc. It’s best for students to use OCR in conjunction with the various other recruitment opportunities available through Wasserman.

Myth: Finance internships are only for juniors.

Fact: Many companies will hire sophomores for summer internships, but it will require additional effort, research, and networking on your part to find those companies. You may also want to consider working for smaller/boutique firms, or even start-ups, who may be more open to bringing on younger interns.  The key is to cast a wide net and keep options open as you begin to build their professional experience, skills, and network.

Myth: Superdays are super fun

Fact: Superdays are a half day or full day final round interview at the company, most commonly seen in finance, accounting, and consulting industries. You should expect to rotate through multiple one-on-one interviews, group interviews, and sometimes, even a leaderless group discussion.  Interviews can be behavioral, case, technical, or stress.  Usually, by the final round, top candidates have met the recruiter and key alumni/decision makers multiple times.

Learn more about the Finance/Business/Consulting industries by attending these events:

What’s Next: Quant Careers, February 11th, 5:30-7pm

What’s Next Finance: Beyond Investment Banking, February 25th, 5:30-6:30pm

Acing the Case Interview, March 4th, 2-3pm

 

 

Myths vs. Facts! The Truth About Landing a Job in Arts & Entertainment

Myths vs. Facts! Breaking down the common misconceptions, urban legends and false facts around landing a job in Arts & Entertainment.

Myth: All you need is talent.

Fact: Talent is only part of what gets you hired. As with any job, you also need to have a resume and other application materials that clearly convey your qualifications. It’s also important to be industry savvy.  The more you understand your industry and the more you network within it, the more effectively you’ll be able to position yourself to be hired!

 

Myth: If you want to work in the entertainment industry, you have to be an actor, writer, or director.

Fact: The entertainment industry has a wide range of employment opportunities beyond those jobs! Think about all the names that you see in the end credits of a movie or tv show, or in a playbill. There are a plethora of freelance and staff positions behind the scenes and throughout every aspect of the industry. You can learn about these by reading trade publications, conducting informational interviews, participating in industry networking events, and attending Wasserman panels such as  “What’s Next: Humanities.”

 

Myth: I’m a performer so I don’t need to do an internship. 

Fact: Internships can be a great way for you to get the inside scoop on what the industry wants. For instance, by interning with a casting office, you’ll see how hiring decisions are made, which can help you be smarter about how you present yourself at an audition.

 

Myth: All actors are waiters.

Fact: While the food service industry does offer a flexible schedule that gives actors the ability to also audition, there are a variety of “sustainable” jobs that an actor can have. This includes teaching artist, web designer, tour guide, concierge, IT support, graphic designer, personal organizer, real estate agent, and fitness trainer, just to name a few. A career counselor can help you identify your marketable skills and determine which sustainable jobs might be right for you.

 

Myth: If I don’t have an agent within six months after graduation, I’ll never get work.

Fact: Most early-career artists don’t have agents! In fact, it’s rare for students to obtain agents immediately after graduation. Agents prefer to see that artists have some experience outside of school – if the artist is able to obtain work on their own or is getting notice from competitions (e.g. the Nicholl Fellowship) or festivals (e.g. SXSW), that signals to the agent that the artist has enough talent to be marketable.

 

 

How Different Job Positions Prepare You: From Librarian to Volunteer to Museum Docent

Volunteer Combines Experience as a Librarian, Museum Docent

16:37 pm By JFriedman in From the Museum

For Candace Stuart, who has worked as a volunteer in the museum’s Docent program, her curiosity about 9/11 began right after that tragic day.

Working as a news librarian for ABC News at the time, she cites her research on the events of 9/11 as some of the most important of her career.

“The Docent program just puts it all together,” Stuart said.

Stuart, currently a librarian at New York University, was a member of the first class of museum docents in January of 2014 and became a volunteer when the museum first opened in May. She continued in the program throughout the year.

She says her library background and her work at the museum have complemented each other.

“They both involve teaching in a way, which I hadn’t experienced until I worked at NYU,” Stuart said.

Being involved in the Docent program has given Stuart the confidence to pass along the information she has learned through the program to museum visitors.

“It’s a great experience,” Stuart said. “You get to expand your knowledge of one of the most important events in this country’s history as well as improve skills in talking to people and groups.”

For Stuart, one of the most memorable moments as a docent came during the museum’s opening week. During that time, the museum was only open to survivors and family members of 9/11. Docents, who are normally encouraged to engage museum guests, were advised to let guests come to them.

“It was more listening then telling,” Stuart said. “It was a very moving experience talking to those who had first-hand knowledge and experience of what this museum is all about.”

In September, Stuart became an intern for the memorial museum’s exhibitions staff as part of her Digital Libraries certificate at Syracuse University. Stuart plans on soon returning to the museum as a docent on a regular basis.

To learn more about Museum Docent positions, click here. For information on volunteer positions with the museum, click here.

Also, be sure to stop by the 9/11 Memorial & Museum table at the upcoming Spring Job and Internship Fair on Thursday, January 29th at NYU Kimmel!

By Deena Farrell, 9/11 Memorial Communications Intern

Edited by NYU Wasserman

 

 

Career Tips to Beat the Winter Break Blues

Unless you’re that lucky NYU student who spends winter break traversing the streets of Paris, jet skiing in the Caribbean, or even staying busy with J-term, it may just be that time of year again.  The time of year where the initial Netflix binge begins to slow, meals from the holidays are finally finishing digestion, and all your friends from home start trickling back to their respective schools, leaving you wondering what in the world you should do with your life. I digress.  Fortunately, I’ve come to find that winter break can be the perfect time to ensure that you’re set for the coming months.  Whether you’re looking for a part-time job, a spring semester/summer internship, or even full-time employment, a few hours of work amid your slew of down time can do wonders. Below you’ll find a few tips to help spice up your professional development over winter break.

1.    Update your resume.

We’ve seen it before: you’ve spent hours adding to your resume, coming up with the perfect format, describing your amazing work and contributions to companies/overall society in just one page, and you’re feeling great about yourself… until you realize that was done over a year ago. A lot’s happened since then, so get to updating!

2.    Creating/updating your LinkedIn page.

For those of you who have yet to hop on the LinkedIn train, there’s no better time than now. Set up your profile and begin making connections.  If you already have a LinkedIn account but (ahem,) haven’t given it a glance in weeks, the time has come my friend.

3.    Get organized: Make Lists.

Organize lists of companies you’re interested in, what you’re looking to get out of employment, locations you’d like to explore, application deadlines, and other general attributes to your professional future.  Making lists can provide clarity, organize to your thoughts, and help you figure out what your next steps should be as you seek employment.

4.    Consider a personal website.

Across disciplines, students and authorities alike have been creating personal websites in order to market themselves professionally. Consider this option and look into some resources for finding ways to build a personal website. (There are both free and costly options out there. Spend some time on Google or speak to a Wasserman Career Coach for more information.)

5.     Network

Reach out to people in your network and express interest in getting more experience in your respective field. You never know how far a simple question or a “hello” can go!

6.    Meet with a Wasserman Career Coach

Whether it’s in person or remotely, winter break is a great time to meet with a career coach to talk in greater detail about your goals for the coming year. By planning ahead, and taking a few moments out of your break to spice up your professional life, you can be steps ahead in the game.

These are just a few tips to help you plan for the rest of the year. If you have any specific questions, feel free to meet with a Wasserman Career Coach. View the Wasserman website for more information on winter break walk-in hours and remote meetings for those outside of NYC. But most importantly, enjoy your winter break! I’m sure there’s something new on Netflix for you to get addicted to.

Once you return from break, make sure to attend our spring career fairs! Information is below:

Spring Job & Internship Fair

Thursday January 29, 2015 11am – 3pm | NYU Kimmel Center

Take advantage of this opportunity to meet with employers hiring for summer internships and full-time positions in various industries!

Engineering & Technology Fall Fair

Thursday, February 12, 2015 11am – 3pm | NYU Brooklyn Campus, Jacobs Gymnasium

NYU Students are invited to explore full-time, part-time, and internship opportunities in a variety of fields, including engineering, computer hardware/software, technology, science, management, and digital media.

Download employer information on The Career Fair Plus app, featuring: 

  • · Complete company listing
  • · Interactive Floor Plan
  • · Event Details
  • · Announcements for real-time updates
  • · Career Fair tips section to help you prepare

Search for the NYU Career Fair Plus app on Google Play or iTunes

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Terri Burns is a junior studying computer science in CAS. This year, Terri is on the communications team with her fellow Peer in Careers. Outside of her work with Wasserman, Terri is a Resident Assistant in Carlyle Court, a Google Student Ambassador, and heavily involved with NYC’s largest student technology organization, Tech@NYU.

 

How to “Wow” Your Interviewer

Claudia Enriquez is a second year student receiving her Masters in Public Administration from NYU Wagner. She currently works as a Graduate Program Assistant at NYU Wasserman. She is a New Yorker at heart, growing up in Long Island, then moving to upstate New York to attend college, and now she’s back downstate and enjoying her time at NYU.

You landed the interview, now it’s time to bring out your A game and really ‘wow’ your interviewer. Follow these simple steps below and prepare to land that dream job/internship!

Research, Research, Research

Did I mention research? Check out the company’s website. Review the company’s mission statement, values, culture, goals, achievements, recent events, and the company’s products/services.  If you know anyone who works there – ask him/her to give you the inside scoop!

Practice Makes Perfect…Or at least Preparation!

Be prepared to the job interview. Practice general and challenging interview questions with your peers.  Practice in front of a mirror – don’t be shy! The more prepared you are, the more confident you’ll feel, which will come off during the interview.  While you should practice, be authentic during the actual interview.

NYU Wasserman has plenty of great career resources.  Swing by during walk-in hours for a mini mock interview, or make an appointment with a career counselor. You can find other helpful resources on CareerNet, under the Career Resources tab. Check it out!

Get Ready and Be on Time

The night before do the following:

  • Have your outfit picked out (rule of thumb: dress one or two levels up)

  • Pack your bag

  • Print out extra copies of your resume

  • Get directions to your destination (Check alternative routes)

  • Relax and have a good night’s sleep

The day of the big interview give yourself enough time to arrive. Arrive between 5-7 minutes early. If you’re too early walk around, grab some water, etc. As soon as you walk through the door, all eyes are on you – that means, be polite to everyone, from the receptionist to the person interviewing you.  Remember to put on your best smile!

How to Answer Questions During the Interview?

During the interview make eye contact and answer questions with confidence.  Use the STAR method:

  • Situation – Describe the situation you were in (e.g., the name of the internship or course you were taking)

  • Task – Identify the specific project you were working on and briefly discuss what it entailed

  • Action – This is the most important element! Specifically identify what YOUR action was related to the question that was asked

  • Result – Close the question by stating an outcome to your situation

If you ever find yourself stuck on a question, that’s okay! Say to the interviewer ‘that’s a good question, let me think about it.’ Pause, breathe, think, and then give your answer.

Ask Meaningful Questions

At the close of the interview, the interviewer will always ask if you have any questions for them.  Have about 5-10 questions prepared, but of course, don’t ask questions already answered during the interview.

Below are good examples of what to ask the interviewer.

  1. What qualities do you think are most important for someone to excel in this position?

  2. What do you personally like most about working for this company?

  3. What would be one of the greatest challenges a person in this position would face?

  4. Can you tell me more about the team I’ll be working with?

  5. What are the next steps in the interview process?

Follow Up

Send a thank you email or a letter to your interviewer(s) 24-48 hours after the interview. If you interviewed with more than one person, send tailored individual thank you notes. Reiterate your strengths and your interest in the company. This is also an opportunity to add anything you did not discuss during the interview. As always, thank them for their time and the opportunity.

Good luck!

Employer Perspective: Is your College Major relevant to the Market?

Murshed Chowdhury acts as an advisor to both companies and individuals who are looking for assistance in technology talent acquisition and development. He has served as the CEO & Partner of Infusive Solutions Inc. since its establishment in 2001. Prior to Infusive, he worked at several recruiting agencies where he honed his skills and rose the ranks within the organization before founding his own company.

With over 15 years of technology placement experience, Murshed has helped secure some of the most competitive technical positions for his clients at some of the world’s most prestigious firms. He holds a Bachelors Degree in Political Science from Fordham University.

Here he shares his insight into how to pick a major that you enjoy and that matches the market demand:

It is important when you’re in college not to just pick a major but the right major, one that will have viable job opportunities when you graduate. Too often, students invest years of their lives, hundreds of thousands of dollars and mount large student debt just to come to terms with the fact that the job market is not very favorable for what they received their degree in. This is a harsh reality lesson to learn but one many graduates face. With a slow recovering economy the outlook can be even more grim and extremely stressful.

I believe that college students need to invest time in following their dreams but to offset that with the realities of the market. Recently, I came across a recent college grad who was bussing tables to make ends meet. He just graduated with a degree in English Literature from a good university. He said his dream was to be a writer. Now, if someone had advised him to augment his degree with a minor in Business Administration or Marketing, he could have landed a job writing for a company blog, or an editor for a media publication company etc. Since he was never advised as such, he had to take whatever he could to make a living.

The key is to make sure that you major in something you enjoy but to be cognizant of what that means down the road when you join the job market. An understanding of majors with the best trajectories for job security, income and the correlation between the two may shed some light on what I am talking about. The chart below is divided into 4 quadrants that describe the various levels of income potential and job security.

Each of the four quadrants above identifies each job with the two critical criteria that are important for anyone looking at the market, especially a new college grad, on how to choose their next position. Income indicates earning potential and is pretty straight forward. Security represents the amount of available jobs for that particular major which correlate to the various employment levels for those defined majors. Basically, the lower the unemployment rate, the greater the security the position affords.

According to a study by the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University, “majors that are most closely aligned with particular industries and occupations tend to have low unemployment rates but not necessarily the highest earnings. Some majors offer both high security and high earnings, while other majors trade off earnings for job security. Healthcare, Science and Business majors have both low unemployment and the highest earnings boost from experience and graduate education. At the same time, Education, Psychology and Social Work majors have relatively low unemployment, but earnings are also low and only improve marginally with experience and graduate education.” In other words, you can choose a major that has good earnings potential and a high degree of job security. You can also find yourself choosing a major that has a high degree of job security, but low relative lifetime earnings potential. Or, you may find yourself drawn to a major that leads to relatively higher unemployment and low wages. As you choose your major, you want to know what most likely awaits you in your future career, and determine your college options and lifestyle accordingly.

Obviously, the most ideal quadrant is the one that has high income and high job security. Basically, for those majoring in Computer Science, Business Administration or Healthcare for example, have the potential to not only land a well-paid job, but they also know that due to a high demand for their positions, it will translate to low unemployment rates. You lose a job in this category; you should have a quick turnaround finding a new one. What can also be inferred from this is the ability to switch jobs for whatever reason is also much easier for those who fall in this quadrant.

The second quadrant we will look at represents those who may not have a high income potential but there is a great level of security for those positions. You may earn less than those in other majors but there is a good demand for your role. You can be gainfully employed whether you’re looking for your first job or interested in changing positions. Those in education are a great example of people who would likely fall into this category. You may not break the bank as an educator but there is a strong demand for teachers so you can look forward to steady employment.

The third quadrant we will look at represents those who have the ability to garnish high earnings but the tradeoff is that it comes with low job security. Finance, Legal and Sales professionals, and to a certain degree, entrepreneurs, fall into this category. Especially, entrepreneurs in their nascent stages. The rewards can be high but stability is low. Everything is dependent upon production; it’s the, “more you kill, the more you eat” mentality. These great rewards come with greater risks. Unless you maintain consistent levels of production, you can find yourself out of a job pretty quickly.

Finally, we will look at what many will consider the least sought after quadrant. These positions are the ones where the ability to earn a decent living is low and the ability to find a job once you lose it very tough. Anthropology or English Literature, as our examples above show, can fall into this area. There just isn’t a great demand for those skill sets which leads to decreasing earning potential and a limit in the amount of available jobs. It is a very tough outlook for those majors.  The key here, for those who fall in this category more so than the others, is to have them augment their degrees with more relevant minors/dual majors or develop  a new skill keeping the job market in mind.

Now, let me be clear, I am a big believer of following your passion, but that does not mean you ignore the realities on the ground. The greatest lesson an entrepreneur learns from the market, is whether their product or service is something someone will pay for. The show Shark Tank covers this in almost all of their episodes. Would-be entrepreneurs are in love with their product or service, but the judges always breathe some reality into them when they tell them, if the sales aren’t there, it’s probably not a great product or service at that point. The market is the ultimate arbitrator. The same goes with colleges and their majors. You may love what you study, but life is different when college ends and you have to face the reality of finding a job, making a living, dealing with mounting student and credit card debt. Again, the market is the ultimate arbitrator. That being said, you can continue learning what excites you, but invest some time in what the market values, and you will avoid the challenges many face post degree.

The solution starts with awareness. Research your major and it’s potential for a job, whether that’s a one year or four years from now. It’s never too late. Just because you’re a senior, it’s not the end of the world but if you can get into that mindset as a freshman, all the better. For many of you who aren’t even sure what you want to do, this could be the reality check you needed to help you decide where to invest the next few years of your life. Take it from someone who knows this reality all too well. I wish someone had told me about this when I was in college a while back. I graduated with a degree in Political Science from Fordham University and decided not to go to law school or apply for Foreign Service. This left me with few options. It’s no surprise that my first job out of college had nothing to do with my major.

Also, speak to your career services center. They can help you understand what’s trending on the market, connect you to alumni or industry experts, offer workshops, inform you about upcoming fairs where you can get a great gauge of what is hot in the job market. In my opinion, the best time to engage the career services center is in your freshmen year, and then your sophomore year, and then your junior year and senior. You get my point. They are there to help, so leverage their capabilities to help you.

Ironically, the greatest lesson the market can teach you, is that you may end up doing something you didn’t want to, simply because you only wanted to learn what is that you wanted to.

In Case You Missed It: Day In The Life at Time Inc.

Did you miss a day in the life at Time Inc?  Click on the image below for a recap!

 Follow us on Twitter @NYUWassEmployer for tweets on a day-in-the-life of employees at different organizations. A professional will take over our account for the day and give you live updates about the projects they work on, meetings they attend, and the culture of their office.

Student Perspective: How to Stay Productive During Thanksgiving Break

By: Claudia Enriquez

Claudia Enriquez is a second year student receiving her Masters in Public Administration from NYU Wagner. She currently works as a Graduate Program Assistant at NYU Wasserman. She is a New Yorker at heart, growing up in Long Island, then moving to upstate New York to attend college, and now she’s back downstate and enjoying her time at NYU.

Before (or after) your food coma from all of the Thanksgiving goodies, take advantage of your Thanksgiving break to start your internship search! These helpful tips will give you a head start with your internship preparation.

Research and secure your Spring or Summer 2015 internship

Don’t be disheartened if you haven’t secured a spring internship yet – there is still time! Companies are still looking for interns to fill spots so do your research and search for companies that are hiring.  Check out CareerNet and other job search engines such as idealist.org and indeed.com.

Prepare for your Summer 2015 internship by researching various options. Block off time to sit down and reflect on the type of internship opportunities you’re most interested in. Do your homework, but don’t send out applications just yet. Most employers are off during the holiday and you don’t want your application getting overlooked.

Organize Your Job Search

Keep track of the companies you research and where you send off applications. It’s important to keep yourself organized to stay on top of your job search process. Create either an excel or word document template with the information below. This will really help you when you start sending out batches of applications after break.

  • Company Name – The name of the organization
  • Contact – The point of contact at the company
  • Email/Phone Number – Point of contact information
  • Application Deadline – Last day to submit your application
  • Date Applied – When you submitted your application
  • Position Title – What position you applied/are applying for
  • Application Summary – What you submitted with your application (resume, cover letter, etc.)
  • Interview – When your interview is scheduled
  • Follow-up – Whether or not you sent a thank you email or letter after the interview
  • Status – If you were rejected, offered the job, pending, etc.

Update your resume

If you haven’t updated your resume since the start of the Fall semester or prior, take advantage of your free time now to do so! Don’t wait until you find your dream job or internship to update your resume. Keep your resume up-to-date so you’re not editing at the very last minute and continue to add your experiences along the way.

Make sure your resume stands out! Have peers look over your resume and visit a Career Coach at Wasserman when you come back from break. If you’re a graduating senior, take advantage of the Resume Book Collection!

Enjoy Thanksgiving break

Lastly, enjoy your break! Spend time with family and friends, and have a great Thanksgiving!

 

 

 

 

Sources: http://jobsearch.about.com/od/findajob/ss/How-To-Organize-Your-Job-Search_2.htm#step-heading