Profile of an OCR Success Story

 

On Campus Recruitment

Name: Manasa Reddy
School: NYU Stern
Full-time Job: Corporate Banking Analyst at Lloyds Bank
Industry: Banking

Best part about using OCR: Meeting with the company multiples times in order for you to get to know the company as well as the other way around.
What every student should know about OCR: You can study abroad for three semesters like I did and still be able to access OCR when you come back and be just as competitive.
OCR survival tip: Take advantage of the information sessions and be sure to schedule your interview immediately.

On-Campus Recruitment (OCR) is one of the many ways for NYU juniors, seniors, and graduate students to discover job and internship opportunities. Through OCR, employers come to the  Wasserman Center to interview students. To obtain access to OCR, you must attend both a mandatory OCR Orientation and an Acing the Interview seminar (find upcoming dates and times on NYU CareerNet–> Seminars). After doing so, you will be able to view, apply to, and schedule interviews for OCR positions through the Jobs tab of your NYU CareerNet account. Learn more about OCR here.

On Campus Recruitment

Tips for Wrapping Up Your Internship on a Positive Note

Nicole Klein Isenhour, Assistant Director at The Wasserman Center for Career Development at NYU-Poly, offers forth some tips for completing your internship.

You’re nearing the end of your internship so it must be time to throw caution to the wind right? WRONG…the final days, weeks, hours of your summer internship are equally as important as your first, if not more! How you leave things off will the employer will leave a lasting impression and set the stage for things moving forward. You always want to end things on a good note and have the employer remember your hard work all summer. Wrapping up the right way can lead to references, recommendations, mentorship, keeping in touch and most importantly: potential consideration for future positions down the line. Not sure what to do? No problem, that’s where we come in with the top 5 tips for wrapping up your internship.

  • Make sure your projects are covered– Finish as much as you can but in the event you are leaving before a project is finished, leave strong documentation so that your coworkers can pick up where you left off or a new person can come in and know what you have already done or what needs to be done. Your coworkers will appreciate you keeping them in the loop and leaving thorough notes.
  • Schedule a final meeting with your supervisor – Review what you have done; projects, your goals moving forward, advice they might have for you in terms of professional development. Mention what you have learned and how this experience has been valuable to you.
  • Ask for constructive feedback – Is there anything you did really well and are there areas for improvement that you could work on moving forward? A thing or two you might be able to improve upon? It shows the employer that you are mature, that you care about your growth and development and that you want to continue to improve and succeed.
  • Thank everyone– Thank your supervisor but also thank anyone else you reported to and perhaps some you did not report to but wanted to thank for the experience, such as higher ups in the company. Ask for a few minutes of their time to drop in and discuss your internship. Use this time to informationally network, share what you learned, how you grew from your time there. Ask to keep in touch in the future, after the internship concludes. Also thank your fellow interns, coworkers and any other staff that contributed to your positive experience. Appreciation goes a long way and leaves a lasting impression. Send handwritten thank you notes as well!
  • Stay connected– Send a hello email every month or 2 to the employer. See what they have been doing in the news or what is happening in the industry to use as some talking points, forward an article that might be applicable to their business and of interest to them. This shows you are invested and care about keeping up with industry trends and current events. You can also share something relevant you did in a class, a group project, a conference you attended, share it!

As always, feel free to make an appointment through CareerNet and come by the Wasserman Center for Career Development to discuss your personal internship experience and career goals/ next steps!

Summer Spotlight Series with Talent Tech

Did you miss Executive Director, Jonathan’s, day at Talent Tech Labs? If so, click on the logo below for a recap.

Sound like a place you’d like to work? Check out the openings on CareerNet: Job IDs: 939426 and 917366.

Summer Internship at AllianceBernstein, Part II

Aziza Sultan is a current NYU student in the accelerated Bachelor’s/Master’s program. She is studying politics for her Bachelor’s degree and concentrating on political economy for her Master’s. She is currently a summer intern at AllianceBernstein’s New York City midtown offices in the Technology and Operations Program. Some interesting internships she has done in the past include interning on location in Kabul, Afghanistan with a firm on a U.S. military literacy contract for Afghan National Police and Army, and at the Nassau County District Attorney’s Office under District Attorney Kathleen Rice. Here, she offers forth some thoughts on the second half of her experience at AllianceBernstein. Click here to read her earlier post.

In my final few days interning at AllianceBernstein, I am surprised at how quickly ten weeks have gone by. In that time, I have learned a lot about derivatives and about operations and have been mentored both officially and unofficially by people in the organization. This spirit of unofficial mentorship was present both among people who were in groups different from mine and also across various positions of seniority throughout the firm.  Most people don’t get to describe their internship as interesting or inspiring. Mine was both.

Since I last wrote part one of my blog about a month ago, I have attended a plethora of events – some catered to interns and others for everyone at the firm. One skill that the program has focused on refining for the interns is presenting and public speaking. The Technology and Operations internship program hosted a multi-hour class led by a professional coach and a Broadway theater actress who comes to the firm to work with employees about connecting with audiences, building content, and the various psychological elements of delivering a speech. This was followed by multiple drills where we exercised what we had just learned. This was especially helpful to myself, as someone who had joined the firm’s Toastmaster’s Club, which aims to improve the communication, public speaking and leadership skills of its members. The club warmly welcomed me, and I signed up to deliver an ice breaker speech at one of their bi-monthly meetings. Not only was this was a great way to meet other people at the firm but it also gave me a chance to exercise my newly learned skills from the course and have the people I worked amongst learn a little more about me on a personal level. I also got written feedback from each person in attendance which was a helpful way to learn about what I needed to work on as a public speaker, in addition to my strengths.

Interns and incoming associates were also treated to a networking reception with senior leaders at AllianceBernstein. It has been really useful to meet with people who work in the different moving parts of the firm because I’ve come to realize that though the organizational structure of the firm is such that there are different divisions that may not work together day to day, collaboration from time to time with people from different divisions on larger projects is necessary and adds variety to the type of work people do. Also, just as a curious person who has a vested interest in the larger organization and workings of the company, it’s useful to know people who do different things than myself. This curiosity led me to schedule meetings with dozens of people across the firm (in groups including Equities, Private Client, Sanford C. Bernstein research roles, Multi Asset Solutions, Fixed Income and more) to learn more about what they do and how their work is important, interesting and makes a difference.

In my group, I was trained and in contact regularly with my mentor and manager, both of whom gave me increasing responsibility on a day to day basis within my group. A moment in which I recognized that my work within our group was meaningful was when my train was stalled in a station as a result of an investigation and I became increasingly worried as each minute passed that I wouldn’t be able to send the early morning email to one of the brokers who I was working with on a daily basis to reconcile company business. (I emailed my mentor and manager as I was on the train to let them know of the situation).  One of the interesting projects our team was involved in was planning the switching of the software system that the derivative operations team would be using in regards to collateral.

Overall, the internship was valuable because I not only learned about the work of the company, but I learned that the people here are proud of what they do and care about each other. A nice end to the summer program was seeing the rotational associates, whom with interns worked closely, graduate to their next positions. The program included a presentation and graduation ceremony for the associates, as well as a reception afterwards.

On a personal note, I’d like to thank the people I’ve come in contact with throughout the course of the internship. In particular, the people who I’ve worked closely with – my manager Brian Mullen, mentor May Hu, and an associate in my group Darren Breda. I’d also like to thank the people I sit by (specifically Christian Paine, Mark Tarnok, Walter Kowalewski and Amro Shabaan) for being so encouraging and welcoming. Thanks to Gaetano DiMiceli, for allowing me to a part of his incredible team. Last but not least, a very special thanks to Erinn Goldenberg and Eshrat Jahan for making this internship experience as seamless and fulfilling as they did!

Summer Spotlight Series with NYU Steinhardt

Did you miss Steinhardt student Rose’s day as an analyst at a market intelligence consulting firm in Shanghai? If so, click on the logo below for a recap.

Want to find an internship, part-time job, or full-time position? Make an appointment through CareerNet to meet with a career coach and start exploring all of the available and exciting opportunities.

Summer Spotlight Series with Flashtalking

Did you miss Nick’s day as a Campaign Management Intern with @Flashtalking? If so, click on the logo below for a recap.

Want to find an internship, part-time job, or full-time position? Make an appointment through CareerNet to meet with a career coach and start exploring all of the available and exciting opportunities.

 

Summer Spotlight Series with Opportunity Finance Network

Recently, Caroline Deng, Stern ’17, shared her day working with @OppFinance. Here, she shares some updates on her summer.

I’m coming to the end of my internship at Opportunity Finance Network (OFN) in Philadelphia. I’m originally from California, and as a freshman, this was my first full summer away from home, as well as my first internship. At first, I definitely felt some anxiety over the transition from the busy streets of Manhattan to a completely different city, but I’ve found many ways to keep myself busy.

1. Exploration.

I run a personal travel blog at www.theurbantouriste.wordpress.com, and coming to a new city gave me the opportunity to explore a new city. So, I invested in monthly transpasses for the SEPTA, the Philadelphia version of the MTA.

When people think of the City of Brotherly Love, the first images that come to mind are often the Liberty Bell, Betsy Ross, and/or the Declaration of Independence. But Philly is more than just a cheesesteak. Armed with my monthly pass, I chose to get to know the city outside of the traditional tourist traps.

Philadelphia is home to one of the largest urban park systems in the entire world, with 63 parks spanning over 9,200 acres. This acreage is almost the size of 11 Central Parks!

My favorite park in Philly has been the Spruce Street Harbor Park, a pop-up summertime village on the Delaware River complete with a hammock garden, outdoor seating, fountains, a restaurant, and for those who are legal, a beer garden. This pop-up park is available from June 27 through August 31, and I’ve found it to be a great place to read and relax.

During another weekend, I traveled outside the city to Montgomery County to visit the University of Pennsylvania’s Morris Arboretum. With 92 acres of labeled flowers, trees, and plants, the place provided a worthwhile escape from city life.

2. Fitness.

The variety of colorful salads and fresh, local produce that my OFN coworkers bring to the office has inspired me to adopt a healthier lifestyle, including physical fitness. The word “exercise” used to make me shudder and reminded me of the awful smell of sweat and patchy, red, post-workout skin. But by stretching to buti yoga, throwing sharp jabs in piloxing, and feeling a comfortable soreness in your muscles after weight lifting, I’ve discovered that I actually enjoy the euphoric feeling that exercising gives me.

Staying physically active has inspired me to set ambitious goals, and I’ve begun a 20-week training program to run a half-marathon. I am hoping to run the Shanghai International Half-Marathon this coming November while I am studying abroad there in the fall.

My summer in Philadelphia has been a very different experience, one that has pushed me to take full advantage of the city and to explore new interests.

I may not necessarily have had the comforts of home here in Philadelphia, but the overall time here has been extremely rewarding.

Being Part of the PepsiCo Family

Carmiel Dizon is an NYU Stern Management and Marketing student graduating in 2015. This summer, she’s here to share some of her thoughts about interning with PepsiCo.

Stepping onto the PepsiCo shuttle to White Plains, I feel the intensity of each heartbeat as adrenaline punches through my veins. With each reverberating ‘click’ of my shoes, all I focus on are those revolving doors, the gates toward something unknown. Dozens of people dressed in suits and casual jeans groggily shuffle to the revolving doors after a long commute. While waiting my turn to pass the shiny glass gates, my mind explodes into a symphony consisting of fears and dread- only to be followed by the mellowing clam of those doors. As the individual in front of me passes through, I clench myself in anticipation and pass on through. The first of many trials passes ushering a wave of relief and excitement until twenty curious pairs of eyes dart toward me. Nervousness grips me once more. Like any first day, the waltz of nervousness clashes with the rumba of excitement. Yet despite the conflict of emotions raging within my heart, the soothing wave of belonging sets in. Calamity dissipates as the fears subside. The image ingrained into my mind elicits an emotional comfort of something like home- a place of belonging.

After the steady routine of sipping coffee and walking through the lobby adorned with familiar logos depicting Pepsi and Tropicana, I feel less like an outsider. Four weeks later, I come to appreciate the challenges associated with marketing. Each task not only allows me to reinforce and expand my knowledge, but also allows for continuous improvement. Though my experience has been brief, my own conception of marketing practices amplifies given a unique set of opportunities. A few weeks ago I attended Dew Tour, an action sports event powered by Mountain Dew, where I witnessed the myriad of theories being implemented and redefined in practice. A soda became more than just a beverage. It brings people together through emphasizing a unique lifestyle that connects with an audience on a deeper, and more emotional level.

My experience at PepsiCo must be understood as a shift in my understanding of community. The comradery shared by employees quickly permeated into the intern sphere of culture. Not even two weeks into my internship, I felt fully immersed as a full-time member of my team. During agency calls, my manager always asks for my opinion. He values any creative input I am able to muster, which results in greater confidence of my own abilities. Feeling important and valued by management is imperative to my success. For instance, while waiting for the 4 train, I can approach a colleague and immediately feel welcomed. As the conversation delves into an exchange between weekend plans after exchanging pleasantries, I can only imagine who I was at the beginning. That fear and nervous anticipation has been replaced by the familiarity of a community- a community I am a part of. At PepsiCo, I’m treated more than an intern. I’m treated like a member of the Pepsi family. For that, I am truly grateful and definitely ready for what is yet to come. First days are always intimidating, but are nothing more than the first gate into tomorrow. A tomorrow of growth nurtured through hardship and supported by those with a single goal in mind… success.

Want to find an internship, part-time job, or full-time position? Make an appointment through CareerNet to meet with a career coach and start exploring all of the available and exciting opportunities.

Halfway Through Your Internship Checklist

So, you’re about half way through your summer internship? How can you make sure you’ll stand out? Here are a few tips on how to shine this summer:

  • Reflect on your experience – if you’re happy with the opportunities you’ve had so far, ask for ways to become more involved in these projects. If you’re unhappy with the experience, you still have time to evaluate why and take initiative to make the most of the internship experience.
  • Schedule a formal mid-summer check in with your internship supervisor to evaluate your performance thus far. Ask about ways that you can continue to grow and develop professionally, as well as contribute to the team.
  • Stay busy – there is always work to be done! Ask your supervisor what he/she needs help with and volunteer to work on all types of projects.
  • Grow your network – ask colleagues out for coffee or lunch. Conduct a non-formal informational interview to learn about their career paths, experience within their roles, and for advice.

Make the most of the second half of your internship and stop by the Wasserman Center for Career Development to discuss your personal internship experience and career goals!

Meet the Global Peers: Prague

Before I start being formal and all, here is some general information about me. My name is Emily Sujka.  But, if you ever meet me face-to-face on campus, you might hear people greet me by another name: Maggie.  I have just completed a semester of studying away in Prague, Czech Republic.  My experience there definitely helped in elucidating many parts of life lurking in the shadows.  I won’t say it has been life altering, after all, going abroad hasn’t changed the course of my life.  But, all the small experiences in Prague, living in a completely different culture, with a different language, diet, set of social standards, have certainly further molded me. Recently, I spoke with NYU’s Wasserman Center about my experiences.

What is your major/class/school?

Currently, (and I say currently because it’s always changing) I am an Economics major in the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) and a part of the Class of 2016.

Why did you want to study away at your particular site?

In actuality, I had no intention of going abroad.  Back in high school, I went to Spain for a month during the summer.  It was dreadful.  I longed for America the whole time.  But, my ideas about going to study in another country shifted with my freshman year RA who had gone abroad with NYU twice and whole-heartedly endorsed the opportunity for any student.  That’s when my research began…

I wanted to study away in the Czech Republic for several reasons.  And no, it wasn’t because it was cheaper or because of its convenient Central European location.  My reasons had to do with the culture.  I love Slavic Cultures, specifically that of Poland.  So, the Czech Republic isn’t Poland…but it was just a step towards a bigger goal.  My motto in life is to keep moving by any means to get to where you want to be. For a semester to be surrounded by food, language, and symbols, associated with Slavic life was just such an elating idea and I knew I couldn’t let the opportunity pass me by.

What classes did you take?

In Prague, I completed Building a State: Czech and Slovak Republics, Modern Dissent, Elementary Polish II, and Architecture.

What was the most meaningful/impactful experience you had abroad?

The most meaningful/impactful experience…well geez, that’s a lot of pressure. I’ve met famous Czech politicians, volunteered a weekend at Benediktus, a volunteer community in a more rural part of the Czech Republic, hiked up Sniezka, the most prominent point of the Silesian Ridge in the Krkonoše mountains, walked along the paths of priests as St. Vitus Cathedral, and even eaten Falafel in St. Wenceslas Square where the Velvet Revolution took place- where the Czechoslovak youth expelled the Communists from their lands, denouncing fear once and for all.  And that’s only the Czech Republic.  I also traveled to 6 other separate European countries during my time here strolling down the Chain Bridge in Budapest, riding bikes in Amsterdam, following the Mural of Princes in Dresden, munching on macaroons in Paris, meeting famous actress and politician Mrs. Vasaryova in Bratislava, and visiting Sukiennice, for my second time, in Krakow.  Being in Europe, seeing as much as I can, taking it all in, has just been a real pleasure.  Borders between countries are just man’s invention.  Yes, some are reasonable, political borders drawn along rivers and mountains, but others are just imaginary lines.  However, you see what you perceive as commonalities.  ”We do that too.”  ”That is NOT a pancake.”  Humanity ties us together no matter where you are.  People help, speak, wonder, and eat no matter where you are.  It’s humbling to see the world in its grandiosity and still feel connected to the world.

What have you learned from your experience that will impact your career endeavors?

I managed three internships this semester.  I know, sounds crazy, but there were too many things presented to take advantage of that I just couldn’t pass up.  Closely working with Wasserman, I learned how to organize an event for any occasion, including how to advertise an event and make material accessible for students.  Seriously, I learned that cookies work wonders on attendance.  In general, I acquired skills in working with people I never thought I’d have.

Furthermore, I also assisted in English teaching in a local elementary school. This was building on previous experience I already had, nonetheless it still allowed me to further understand people.  In childhood lies the rawest state of our being.  Children can teach us more than any seminar and so, even though I don’t wish to pursue education or another career path having to do with kids, I have greatly valued this experience that has allowed me to do something outside of my comfort zone while allowing me to cement this sentiment.

Another good bit of advice: Even though it’s optimal to figure out what you want, crossing stuff off this list isn’t such a bad thing either.  I also helped create a survey for the Bohemia Jazz Festival, a free music festival held in the Czech Republic annually.  Something that sounds so big not only took time in its creation, but it also took many edits and rewrites, tracking down the right people and being persistent.  Sometimes it is not only the skills and new techniques we obtain from an internship or job experience, but also small achievements along the way.