Student Perspective: How to Stay Productive During Thanksgiving Break

By: Claudia Enriquez

Claudia Enriquez is a second year student receiving her Masters in Public Administration from NYU Wagner. She currently works as a Graduate Program Assistant at NYU Wasserman. She is a New Yorker at heart, growing up in Long Island, then moving to upstate New York to attend college, and now she’s back downstate and enjoying her time at NYU.

Before (or after) your food coma from all of the Thanksgiving goodies, take advantage of your Thanksgiving break to start your internship search! These helpful tips will give you a head start with your internship preparation.

Research and secure your Spring or Summer 2015 internship

Don’t be disheartened if you haven’t secured a spring internship yet – there is still time! Companies are still looking for interns to fill spots so do your research and search for companies that are hiring.  Check out CareerNet and other job search engines such as idealist.org and indeed.com.

Prepare for your Summer 2015 internship by researching various options. Block off time to sit down and reflect on the type of internship opportunities you’re most interested in. Do your homework, but don’t send out applications just yet. Most employers are off during the holiday and you don’t want your application getting overlooked.

Organize Your Job Search

Keep track of the companies you research and where you send off applications. It’s important to keep yourself organized to stay on top of your job search process. Create either an excel or word document template with the information below. This will really help you when you start sending out batches of applications after break.

  • Company Name – The name of the organization
  • Contact – The point of contact at the company
  • Email/Phone Number – Point of contact information
  • Application Deadline – Last day to submit your application
  • Date Applied – When you submitted your application
  • Position Title – What position you applied/are applying for
  • Application Summary – What you submitted with your application (resume, cover letter, etc.)
  • Interview – When your interview is scheduled
  • Follow-up – Whether or not you sent a thank you email or letter after the interview
  • Status – If you were rejected, offered the job, pending, etc.

Update your resume

If you haven’t updated your resume since the start of the Fall semester or prior, take advantage of your free time now to do so! Don’t wait until you find your dream job or internship to update your resume. Keep your resume up-to-date so you’re not editing at the very last minute and continue to add your experiences along the way.

Make sure your resume stands out! Have peers look over your resume and visit a Career Coach at Wasserman when you come back from break. If you’re a graduating senior, take advantage of the Resume Book Collection!

Enjoy Thanksgiving break

Lastly, enjoy your break! Spend time with family and friends, and have a great Thanksgiving!

 

 

 

 

Sources: http://jobsearch.about.com/od/findajob/ss/How-To-Organize-Your-Job-Search_2.htm#step-heading

 

Student Perspective: “What’s Next? Entrepreneurship” Panel Discussion Recap

By: Indra N. Kar

Born and raised in Connecticut, Indra N. Kar is a senior in CAS. He is pursuing a B.A. in Economics with minors in Mathematics and Chemistry. In addition to being a Peer in Career at Wasserman, he is involved on campus as the Treasurer of the Medical Dialogue Review and a member of TEDxNYU’s Finance Team.

The “What’s Next? Entrepreneurship” Panel Discussion took place on November 5, 2014 at the new Leslie eLab. It was a very informative program that was organized by Wasserman and co-sponsored by the Entrepreneurship and Innovation Association (EIA) and the NYU Entrepreneurial Institute. As a senior majoring in Economics with an interest in business, I was curious to hear what the panelists had to say regarding startups and the entrepreneurial world.

 

There were three key takeaways from the seminar:

Why to Become an Entrepreneur:

A couple of the panelists worked in the financial services industry prior to creating their own start-ups. In fact, both of them left the industry during the height of the financial crisis to find something where they could control their own destinies. Another panelist was happy to leave his cold-calling job prior to his entrepreneurial endeavors. The three of them expressed a desire to directly observe the results of their work. Whether it was finance or cold calling, they had difficulty seeing the impact they were having on people’s lives. However, by starting their own businesses, they experienced more person-to-person interactions. This allowed them to observe the ways they were affecting individuals’ lives and the influence they were having on the final product. 

Learning from Failure:

The unpredictability of a start-up’s success can lead many to shy away from starting a business. However, the speakers emphasized that failure can teach you several things including your own personal weaknesses, the business strategies that don’t work, and the fact that the best ideas are often organic ideas. 

Furthermore, the majority of the panel believed that the journey and the end result are equally important. Along the way, experience is the best teacher. You can either let past failures discourage you, or you can learn from them and move on. One of the panelists described entrepreneurship as “a state of mind,” which I think nicely captured the emotional aspect of innovation.

Qualities of a Successful Entrepreneur:

Words and phrases that repeatedly came up during the discussion were “risk taking,” “focus,” “curiosity,” and “creativity.” From the discussion, it appeared that the work of a successful entrepreneur is reflective of these four things.

The riskiness of starting your own business is inherent. You are starting something from scratch, often times without a lot of capital in the beginning. In order to secure a significant amount of funding, you need to prove yourself first. You have to find the right business partners, and sometimes, you have student debt to worry about paying off. But, how will you know success if you don’t try?

This is where the risk-taking nature and the ability to maintain focus come in handy for an entrepreneur. The panelists generally agreed that entrepreneurs need to have goals in mind and keep striving until the goals are met. Intellectual curiosity is another source of motivation that they mentioned. It helps jumpstart your creativity, which can help you think on your feet when something doesn’t go as planned. The success of a start-up is not guaranteed, but the panelists believed that the right qualities and right attitude could help you become a successful entrepreneur.

Have you attended or plan to attend one of Wasserman’s events, and would like to be featured on our blog? Let us know! Email us at career.communications@nyu.edu.

In Case You Missed It: Day In The Life Takeover by Deloitte

Did you miss last week’s day in the life takeover by Deloitte?  Click on the images below for recaps of each day!

Deloitte Consulting
Deloitte AERS Advisory
Deloitte AERS Advisory
Deloitte Consulting
Deloitte Consulting
Deloitte Audit
Deloitte Audit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Follow us on Twitter @NYUWassEmployer for tweets on a day-in-the-life of employees at different organizations. A professional will take over our account for the day and give you live updates about the projects they work on, meetings they attend, and the culture of their office.

3rd Annual School of Professional Studies Networking Night

Networking Night 2014

On November 7, 2014, the NYU Wasserman Career Center, NYU SHRM Chapter, and NYU Integrated Marketing Association jointly hosted the Third Annual School of Professional Studies Networking Night. Over 100 NYU School of Professional Studies graduate students and 23 employers attended the event. It was a great opportunity for students to network with industry professionals and gain insights into these industries.

The event began by giving students time to develop their pitches, and then allowed for two 30 minute roundtable discussions with industry professionals.  Students practiced and received feedback on their pitches during these roundtables, and the event concluded with an open networking session. For a list of Employers that participated in the event, please click link…

As a first-time participant and volunteer, I enjoyed the event very much and learned a tremendous amount from the industry professionals. I am grateful that they took time out of their busy schedules to engage with students, answer questions, provide resume/interview tips, and offer opportunities to connect with them. It was inspiring to see some of these people were former M.S. HRMD program graduates, and hear them talk about how this degree enhanced their careers. I strongly recommend more students attend the event next year and prepare a great pitch.

The Quick Tips for Perfecting Your Pitch shared invaluable tips with the students:

The purpose of having a pitch during networking activities is to raise awareness of “your personal brand” in order to build authentic relationships with professionals and to share your abilities, skills and background.

Your professional pitch should…

  • Communicate your personal brand
  • Covey your unique selling point (USP)
  • Answer the questions “Tell me about yourself?” “What do you do?” and “What are you interested in doing next?”

To create your pitch, focus on…

  • Using the STAR method (Situation, Task, Action, Result) to tell stories, rather than just telling facts
  • Tailoring your pitch for the audience and setting
  • Making it conversational; think of open-ended questions to ask the employer or contact 

Keep in mind these “Golden Rules”…

  • Be an authentic and genuine individual
  • Become your own subject matter expert
  • Personalize, prepare, and practice your pitch

Don’t miss out on our upcoming webinar, “Networking Over the Holidays” on Wednesday, Dec. 3rd at 12:00pm. RSVP here!

In Case You Missed It: Day In The Life at Framed

Did you miss a day in the life at Framed?  Click on the image below for a recap!

Day In The Life at Framed

Follow us on Twitter @NYUWassEmployer for tweets on a day-in-the-life of employees at different organizations. A professional will take over our account for the day and give you live updates about the projects they work on, meetings they attend, and the culture of their office.

In Case You Missed It: Day In The Life at The Help U

Did you miss a day in the life at The Help U?  Click on the image below for a recap!

#dayinthelife at The Help U

Follow us on Twitter @NYUWassEmployer for tweets on a day-in-the-life of employees at different organizations. A professional will take over our account for the day and give you live updates about the projects they work on, meetings they attend, and the culture of their office.

In Case You Missed It: Day In The Life at Manna Project International

Did you miss Carley & Natalie sharing their day as program directors for Manna Project International?  Click on the image below for a recap!

Day In The Life at Manna Project International

Follow us on Twitter @NYUWassEmployer for tweets on a day-in-the-life of employees at different organizations. A professional will take over our account for the day and give you live updates about the projects they work on, meetings they attend, and the culture of their office.

Employer Insight: 5 Things to Expect at a Startup

 

Susan Zheng is the co-founder and CEO of Lynxsy, a mobile recruitment marketplace for companies to hire junior, non-technical talent. Previously, she was an early employee at Tough Mudder where she helped the company grow from 10 to 200 in two years. She graduated from NYU Stern with a degree in Finance and International Business.

Career advice: Take chances, and don’t worry if your career doesn’t follow a formula. The most successful people in history have had non-linear careers.

5 Things to Expect at a Startup

As a soon-to-be or recent grad, you’re chomping at the bit to jump into the workforce. You’ve got a stellar resume and awesome references, but where to begin?

You could take the typical route of college grads and pound the pavement in pursuit of a corporate gig. But maybe you’re looking for a little more excitement and a little less routine, a company that veers off the beaten path and forges its own trail. If you want to be a part of something from the ground up, a startup could be just the place to launch your career.

What exactly will it mean to work at a new uncharted business? Before you fire off your resume, you should know a little bit about what you’re getting into. Here’s a list of five things you can expect—and look forward to—if you work at a startup:

1) Be Ready to Wear Many Hats

When your team is small, as it inevitably will be in the beginning, you’ll likely be assigned tasks not directly in your line of duty. One moment you might be doing competitor research, the next you might be negotiating vendor agreements and the next you could be ordering toilet paper for the office. In your daily grind, you’ll undoubtedly get to dig into projects that would be out of reach in a typical entry-level position.

2)  Change Is the Only Constant

In the world of startups, change is the only constant—so you’d better be flexible. The company could decide to pivot in a new direction. Or employee growth could make you go from the sole business development associate to the head of sales in a matter of weeks. It might be as simple as changing priorities from mid-morning to the afternoon. If it pains you to switch gears all day long, or you’re on the retentive side when it comes to your to-do list, then steer clear. But if you’re game for variety, you’ve got the startup mentality.

3) 100% Mindshare

You won’t be punching a clock the same way you would at an established company.  Startups have a smaller window to get results, which may mean logging extra hours to ramp up the business. Your contributions won’t be confined to the office—if you even have one— and your schedule will probably include late-night brainstorming sessions over pizza. More than your hours, your passion and productivity will be key. You should expect to have 100% mindshare, which may involve eating, breathing and sleeping with the wellbeing of the company on your mind.

4) The Payoff

You shouldn’t join a startup solely on the off chance it could be the next big social network. Join one because you want to roll up your sleeves and be involved in the thrilling nitty-gritty of growing a business. You can make an average entry-level salary ($35K-$45K) and have the opportunity to earn a small equity share in the business. Not all startups will enjoy outrageous success, but those that excel tend to generously reward the individuals who have invested their time and talents to grow the business. Financial compensation aside, you are getting the chance to be involved in something awesome, so enjoy the journey.

5) Unlimited Potential

Career trajectory at a startup isn’t linear. There may be no distinct corporate ladder to climb, but there’s the potential for a big upside if you’re smart, motivated and committed. You could start in customer service and be promoted to managing the entire 20 person customer service team in 3 months. Once you prove yourself, you’ll rise in the organization and gain valuable skills and experience.  If the company takes off, you’ll be invited along for the ride.

Sound exciting and worth a gander? Go for it—make the bold move and explore opportunities with a startup today. If you don’t know where to begin, start your search with Lynxsy.

Would you like to meet  Susan Zheng, co-founder and CEO of Lynxsy? Attend the What’s Next Entrepreneurship Career Panel – Wednesday, Nov. 5th at 5:30pm. RSVP here!

What Does a Perfect Storm and The Best Job for the Future Have in Common?

Earlier this year, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics published their Top Ten List of Best Jobs for the Future.  Ranking #2 on the list was financial advisor with a projected 10-year growth rate of 27%–almost 3 times the job growth rate of all occupations.

So, why is financial advisor ranked so high?  Well, it’s actually a perfect storm of demographics, institutional change and consumer need.  First, the average age of a financial advisor in the industry today is 57 so if you fast-forward 10 years with retirements, practice mergers & acquisitions and death, the gap needed to fill all these vacancies is over 237,000.

Also people are living longer – the life expectancy of someone in the U.S. is 79 years old.  Now compare that to the life expectancy of someone who lived in 1900 – only 43.  So with medical advances and standard of living improvements people now get two lives when they used to get one!  Or, to view it another way, according to the US Census, the number of Americans aged 65 and older is projected to double by 2050.

The second part of this perfect storm is institutional change.  Back in the day, retirement savings was essentially taken care of from your company, government, and/or union.  Things are different now and Gen Y knows that all the ‘heavy lifting’ for living a comfortable lifestyle in retirement rests on their shoulders – there are no defined benefit plans and Social Security will run dry. And depending on how you look at it, living longer could have its drawbacks if there was not a disciplined approach to retirement planning.  The reality is ‘retirement’, how anyone defines it, can last 30+ years.

Finally, consumer need for sound financial advice from a professional has become more prevalent than ever before.  The multitude of choices, product complexities, lack of time for ‘doing-it-yourself’, and recent market crashes like that of 2008 brings great demand for help.  Consumers want to sit down with someone who can educate them on what’s out there to take care of their needs so they can make smarter financial decisions.  And according to a recent report by LIMRA, 78% of Americans surveyed aged 25-44 do not have a financial advisor.

So, this perfect storm does have a happy ending – a great opportunity for someone who is entrepreneurial, ambitious and passionate about starting their own financial advisory practice and truly helping people with their long-term plans.  The market opportunity is there and the career prospects are ripe – it’s rewarding, it’s challenging, it’s exciting and it’s needed.

At Empire Wealth Strategies we have a unique platform to help someone transform their start-up to a successful and purposeful financial advisory practice.  Check us out if you want to learn more.

Are you interested in working for Empire Wealth Strategies? Attend the Empire Wealth Strategies Recruiter-in-Residence on Thursday, Nov. 13th. RSVP here!

4 Golden Rules to Rocking Your Virtual Internship

By Janel Abrahami

Janel Abrahami is a May 2014 graduate of NYU Steinhardt’s Applied Psychology program. She currently serves the NBCUniversal intern population as a Campus 2 Career Assistant and a catalyst for early career development.You can find her talking about all things work on Twitter and LinkedIn

Looking for a flexible way to explore a new industry or pursue a passion while at school? Consider a virtual internship! Check out the NYU CareerNet job board for current openings.

From campus ambassador gigs, to web development co-ops, to editorial spots, virtual internships are as limitless as ever before. These unique positions allow young professionals to gain valuable experience in chosen fields while still maintaining some flexibility in their crazy schedules. They can even be great ways to extend summer internships into the fall semester by doing work remotely from campus!

However, with this flexibility may also come a lack of structure that could derail your progress working away from the office. Heed these golden rules to get the most out of your virtual internship- just add WiFi:

  1. Set clear goals from the beginning: The best way to determine how much progress you’ve made is to measure against a fixed goal. Have a conversation with your supervisor at the start of your internship about what she would like you to accomplish, as well as the company’s goals in general. Keep these handy to reference when working and be ready to…

  2. Schedule regular check-ins with your supervisor: Plan 30-minute calls or skype sessions every month or after each project to get feedback on what what’s working and what can be improved upon going forward. This is a great time to get valuable feedback from your boss, but it’s also a chance for you to be honest about your experience so far and make sure that you are getting the guidance and mentorship you need as well.

  3. Keep track of your deadlines: When school and extracurriculars are also competing for your commitment, it can be easy to lose track of an internship assignment- especially when your boss is not personally there to make sure you get it done. Keep a shared work calendar on Google Drive with your team; break assignments into smaller tasks; set reminders on your phone- however you stay organized and keep your deadlines in mind.

  4. Stay inspired!: A virtual internship should be an organic way to pursue your passion wherever you are. Keep up-to-date on news in your field, subscribe to trade journals, and network with other virtual interns to share ideas and find inspiration when you feel disengaged.

Have you held a virtual internship before? What advice would you add to this list?