Category Archives: Employers

In Case You Missed It: Day In The Life Takeover by Deloitte

Did you miss last week’s day in the life takeover by Deloitte?  Click on the images below for recaps of each day!

Deloitte Consulting
Deloitte AERS Advisory
Deloitte AERS Advisory
Deloitte Consulting
Deloitte Consulting
Deloitte Audit
Deloitte Audit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Follow us on Twitter @NYUWassEmployer for tweets on a day-in-the-life of employees at different organizations. A professional will take over our account for the day and give you live updates about the projects they work on, meetings they attend, and the culture of their office.

In Case You Missed It: Day In The Life at The Help U

Did you miss a day in the life at The Help U?  Click on the image below for a recap!

#dayinthelife at The Help U

Follow us on Twitter @NYUWassEmployer for tweets on a day-in-the-life of employees at different organizations. A professional will take over our account for the day and give you live updates about the projects they work on, meetings they attend, and the culture of their office.

In Case You Missed It: Day In The Life at Manna Project International

Did you miss Carley & Natalie sharing their day as program directors for Manna Project International?  Click on the image below for a recap!

Day In The Life at Manna Project International

Follow us on Twitter @NYUWassEmployer for tweets on a day-in-the-life of employees at different organizations. A professional will take over our account for the day and give you live updates about the projects they work on, meetings they attend, and the culture of their office.

Employer Insight: 5 Things to Expect at a Startup

 

Susan Zheng is the co-founder and CEO of Lynxsy, a mobile recruitment marketplace for companies to hire junior, non-technical talent. Previously, she was an early employee at Tough Mudder where she helped the company grow from 10 to 200 in two years. She graduated from NYU Stern with a degree in Finance and International Business.

Career advice: Take chances, and don’t worry if your career doesn’t follow a formula. The most successful people in history have had non-linear careers.

5 Things to Expect at a Startup

As a soon-to-be or recent grad, you’re chomping at the bit to jump into the workforce. You’ve got a stellar resume and awesome references, but where to begin?

You could take the typical route of college grads and pound the pavement in pursuit of a corporate gig. But maybe you’re looking for a little more excitement and a little less routine, a company that veers off the beaten path and forges its own trail. If you want to be a part of something from the ground up, a startup could be just the place to launch your career.

What exactly will it mean to work at a new uncharted business? Before you fire off your resume, you should know a little bit about what you’re getting into. Here’s a list of five things you can expect—and look forward to—if you work at a startup:

1) Be Ready to Wear Many Hats

When your team is small, as it inevitably will be in the beginning, you’ll likely be assigned tasks not directly in your line of duty. One moment you might be doing competitor research, the next you might be negotiating vendor agreements and the next you could be ordering toilet paper for the office. In your daily grind, you’ll undoubtedly get to dig into projects that would be out of reach in a typical entry-level position.

2)  Change Is the Only Constant

In the world of startups, change is the only constant—so you’d better be flexible. The company could decide to pivot in a new direction. Or employee growth could make you go from the sole business development associate to the head of sales in a matter of weeks. It might be as simple as changing priorities from mid-morning to the afternoon. If it pains you to switch gears all day long, or you’re on the retentive side when it comes to your to-do list, then steer clear. But if you’re game for variety, you’ve got the startup mentality.

3) 100% Mindshare

You won’t be punching a clock the same way you would at an established company.  Startups have a smaller window to get results, which may mean logging extra hours to ramp up the business. Your contributions won’t be confined to the office—if you even have one— and your schedule will probably include late-night brainstorming sessions over pizza. More than your hours, your passion and productivity will be key. You should expect to have 100% mindshare, which may involve eating, breathing and sleeping with the wellbeing of the company on your mind.

4) The Payoff

You shouldn’t join a startup solely on the off chance it could be the next big social network. Join one because you want to roll up your sleeves and be involved in the thrilling nitty-gritty of growing a business. You can make an average entry-level salary ($35K-$45K) and have the opportunity to earn a small equity share in the business. Not all startups will enjoy outrageous success, but those that excel tend to generously reward the individuals who have invested their time and talents to grow the business. Financial compensation aside, you are getting the chance to be involved in something awesome, so enjoy the journey.

5) Unlimited Potential

Career trajectory at a startup isn’t linear. There may be no distinct corporate ladder to climb, but there’s the potential for a big upside if you’re smart, motivated and committed. You could start in customer service and be promoted to managing the entire 20 person customer service team in 3 months. Once you prove yourself, you’ll rise in the organization and gain valuable skills and experience.  If the company takes off, you’ll be invited along for the ride.

Sound exciting and worth a gander? Go for it—make the bold move and explore opportunities with a startup today. If you don’t know where to begin, start your search with Lynxsy.

Would you like to meet  Susan Zheng, co-founder and CEO of Lynxsy? Attend the What’s Next Entrepreneurship Career Panel – Wednesday, Nov. 5th at 5:30pm. RSVP here!

What Does a Perfect Storm and The Best Job for the Future Have in Common?

Earlier this year, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics published their Top Ten List of Best Jobs for the Future.  Ranking #2 on the list was financial advisor with a projected 10-year growth rate of 27%–almost 3 times the job growth rate of all occupations.

So, why is financial advisor ranked so high?  Well, it’s actually a perfect storm of demographics, institutional change and consumer need.  First, the average age of a financial advisor in the industry today is 57 so if you fast-forward 10 years with retirements, practice mergers & acquisitions and death, the gap needed to fill all these vacancies is over 237,000.

Also people are living longer – the life expectancy of someone in the U.S. is 79 years old.  Now compare that to the life expectancy of someone who lived in 1900 – only 43.  So with medical advances and standard of living improvements people now get two lives when they used to get one!  Or, to view it another way, according to the US Census, the number of Americans aged 65 and older is projected to double by 2050.

The second part of this perfect storm is institutional change.  Back in the day, retirement savings was essentially taken care of from your company, government, and/or union.  Things are different now and Gen Y knows that all the ‘heavy lifting’ for living a comfortable lifestyle in retirement rests on their shoulders – there are no defined benefit plans and Social Security will run dry. And depending on how you look at it, living longer could have its drawbacks if there was not a disciplined approach to retirement planning.  The reality is ‘retirement’, how anyone defines it, can last 30+ years.

Finally, consumer need for sound financial advice from a professional has become more prevalent than ever before.  The multitude of choices, product complexities, lack of time for ‘doing-it-yourself’, and recent market crashes like that of 2008 brings great demand for help.  Consumers want to sit down with someone who can educate them on what’s out there to take care of their needs so they can make smarter financial decisions.  And according to a recent report by LIMRA, 78% of Americans surveyed aged 25-44 do not have a financial advisor.

So, this perfect storm does have a happy ending – a great opportunity for someone who is entrepreneurial, ambitious and passionate about starting their own financial advisory practice and truly helping people with their long-term plans.  The market opportunity is there and the career prospects are ripe – it’s rewarding, it’s challenging, it’s exciting and it’s needed.

At Empire Wealth Strategies we have a unique platform to help someone transform their start-up to a successful and purposeful financial advisory practice.  Check us out if you want to learn more.

Are you interested in working for Empire Wealth Strategies? Attend the Empire Wealth Strategies Recruiter-in-Residence on Thursday, Nov. 13th. RSVP here!

Employer Insight: Five keys to entrepreneurial success

By:  Blake McCammon 

Blake McCammon is the COO of ProtoHack, the only code-free hackathon. ProtoHack exists to show non-coders that they too can create something amazing from nothing. ProtoHack aims to empower the non-technical entrepreneur with the tools, knowledge and community to help you bring your idea to life and communicate it visually through prototyping.

Forming your first startup is not a task for the faint at heart. You think you have every piece of information and every problem solved, but once you decide to make the jump into entrepreneurship and things go awry, your true drive and ambition will either shine or fade into the background. The decision to step into entrepreneurship should be well calculated. According to The U.S. Small Business Administration, approximately 543,000 new businesses get started each month, with a third of those failing in the first two years and 60% finding they’re doomed by their fourth year in business.

Being an entrepreneur has high risks and high rewards. Stepping out into the world of entrepreneurship is something that can be extremely daunting and risky, so understanding how to be successful is imperative. Whether you’re a founder or co-founder, these five keys to entrepreneurial success will help you launch and grow your new venture. 

Mistakes happen, embrace them.
Almost every entrepreneur has had their fair share of mistakes when it comes to being at the helm of a company. Whether they drop clients because they’re frustrating, only to later regret it, or try to perfect the process early on within their own organization when they should be focusing on the bigger picture, it’s nearly impossible to get it right every single time. What’s important is that you’re able to learn from mistakes and use them to your advantage when you can. When you embrace missteps, you put yourself in the position to be able to grow and move forward.

Work with those who will challenge you.
This is one of the most important mantras an entrepreneur should have, not only in business but also in their personal lives. When you first start your own company, it’s important to surround yourself with people who really push and drive you to step up your game. If you work with those who don’t, it’ll eventually rub off on you. Working with people who are equally as passionate and driven as you will do nothing but set you up for success.

When choosing business partners and mentors, don’t just pick your best friend, pick someone who is going to push you, challenge you, and make you a better entrepreneur. With a partner like that, you’re less likely to lose the drive and ambition you started with.

Be smart about where you invest.
If you gained experience in the corporate world before you took the entrepreneurial leap, you know what it’s like to have access to tools and budgets that you don’t necessarily have when it comes to starting your own company. It can be a big culture shock when you can no longer afford the pricey but effective software programs or outrageous advertising budget you became accustomed to. Instead, you’ll have to get creative, such as using free or budget-friendly software before you’re at a point where you can start scaling your business. Find the tools you simply cannot live without and prioritize them. Invest when you’re financially ready and not a moment sooner.

Get out of your comfort zone and network
Getting out of your comfort zone is one of the most important things you can do as an entrepreneur. In fact, when starting your first business, referrals will go a long way. Networking is one of the most important aspects of an entrepreneurship because the connections you make will determine the strength of your network and ultimately could determine the success of your company. Going to events where the only goal in mind is to be pushing cards, shaking hands and making meaningful contacts is now part of your job. Understanding the value behind networking and doing a good job of it will take you far. Think about possible connections you have that need to be fostered and use them to your advantage.

Have fun, find what you’re passionate about, and don’t settle!
We’ve probably all seen others who settle because they’re not brave enough to take the leap of faith into entrepreneurship. We say they’re playing it safe but really what’s happening is that they are denying their own happiness and giving up the opportunity to have fun and live their passion. In short, they’re settling.

The amount of fun you have following your passion will be a determining factor in how much you excel at your new venture. Suddenly, working sixty to eighty hours a week isn’t so difficult when you’re doing it while exploring your passion.

Steve Jobs said it best during a conversation with Pixar CEO John Lassete: “In your life you only get to do so many things and right now we’ve chosen to do this, so let’s make it great.”

Settling isn’t something that should even be in your vocabulary as an entrepreneur. We only get one life, so use it, follow your passion and whatever your passion is, go for it.

Learn more about ProtoHack by visiting their website, then sign up for their free event coming to New York City on November 15. 

Hatstand Green Beret Program

Hatstand is a global financial technology consultancy with a specialist focus on electronic trading systems, connectivity, data management, risk, compliance and regulation. With offices in major trading centers in Europe, the Americas and Asia, we have launched the careers of hundreds of technology professionals, many of whom now hold senior level positions in leading financial institutions. 

Our Green Beret program focuses on talent development for technology professionals within financial services.  We select individuals with the right attitude, energy and enthusiasm, plus relevant technical experience, and combine this with bespoke training and mentoring.  Our junior consultants typically spend two years with one of our clients.

Gaurav is a Java Developer who recently completed his first year with the Hatstand Green Beret (HGB) program.  He is working with the Consolidated Alerts and Monitoring (CAM) team with one of our global investment banking clients.  Gaurav has shared a brief overview of his role, its challenges and his successes:

CAM is a global system requiring geographical distribution of resources.  It was conceived as part of Cash Equities in Investment Banking but its systems are responsible for trade monitoring activities for the entire investment banking group.  CAM systems receive client order flows from multiple systems and performs real time trade risk checks, monitoring and surveillance.  The main responsibilities in this role are application enhancement and development, testing and QA analysis.  There is no dedicated QA/testing team so it becomes the developer’s responsibility to ensure high quality of the software solution.  Developers also engage the business in requirements and testing and are sometimes required to provide L3 support. 

The team is distributed across US, Europe and APAC regions.  It is a growing team with many new people and senior developers with specific expertise in the design and implementation of high performance framework.  The team is faced with the complex and aging portfolio of software solutions.  As the number of applications has grown it has eroded the performance and stability of the system, so there is a need to review and refactor the existing system to improve performance.  Most of the development work is around application enhancements.  After every change in the application thorough regression testing needs to be performed, which is a time consuming and manual process.  I have built tools to automate certain parts of this process, which has improved overall productivity and turnaround time for regression testing.  

Before joining Hatstand I worked for two years in the software industry as a Java developer.  Through this role in the HGB program I have gained experience developing low latency high throughput financial applications, and knowledge of electronic trading in cash equity markets.  My technical skillset includes Java, databases, shell scripting and FIX protocol.  In the future I would like to continue to gain technical expertise in developing high throughput and low latency applications in the financial sector.

Want to learn more? Meet with Hatstand for a one-on-one informational interview through our Recruiter-in-Residence program on Tuesday 10/28 by RSVPing through NYU CareerNet > Events > Seminars today!

Reflections on Work-Life Balance: Finding “Balance” Through Work that Matters

By: Lisa Krauthamer, Managing Director of Northeast Recruitment for Teach For America

Lisa was a 2005 Atlanta corps member in which she taught second grade. Following her time in the classroom she joined Teach For America’s recruitment team to bring more great people into classrooms and the larger movement to end educational inequity. She currently oversees campus recruitment in the northeast. She graduated from Cornell in 2004 with a degree in policy analysis and management.

Countless commentaries have been published over the last few years seeking to explain and understand the millennial generation. Generally defined as people born between 1980 and 1995, we (disclosure: I am one, though I am a child of the early 1980’s) are said to have a new and different perspective on jobs and the workplace—as well as how these components fit into our lives outside of work.

I have had the pleasure of attending the Wasserman Center’s spring conference for employers the past few years and each year brings more fascinating discussion on millennials.   At a recent conference, a speaker from Universum Global–an organization that surveys students and young professionals about their career aspirations, preferences in the work place, and ideal place to work—reported the results of a recent survey. For three consecutive years, the survey–which queried a huge sample of over 65,000 students—found that millennials seek work-life balance over all else.

But what does work-life balance mean to us and where can we find it? I, like other millennials, interpret work-life balance differently than previous generations. Instead of defining it as having enough time for one’s work and personal/family life, millennials see it as flexible hours and the workplace feeling like a second home–a blurred line between work and one’s personal life.  For me, work-life balance has much to do with whether I am living out my values and passions through my work. When I feel my work is an extension of things I care deeply about, I feel in balance because I have not been forced to choose one over another. Indeed, my work and personal lives are intertwined. The same is true of many colleagues and friends who are of the millennial generation; when they are doing the work that feels important and impactful to them, they feel in balance.

As a newly-minted college graduate and Teach for America corps member teaching elementary school in Atlanta, Georgia, I struggled at first to find this balance.  The work was difficult and the hours long. But, I was making a direct impact on students—and I was living out my values of justice, equity, and hard work each day.  For me, this brought the balance I was seeking, with my personal and professional values aligned. I have continued my efforts to achieve that balance in my current role, where I help to recruit new Teach For America corps members. I encourage and challenge my fellow millennials out there to consider work-life balance in a similar way: that is, do work that brings you joy, is meaningful to you and the world, and is impactful. With my bias clearly showing, I believe one of the best ways to do this is through Teach for America, which affords the opportunity to work to combat the inequities in our educational system.

I encourage you to check out this video about how you can bring what you are good at and what brings you joy and meaning into a classroom

Are you interested in working for Teach For America? The next deadline to apply  is October 24th.

Teach For America Corps Member ID 945669


Looking for a post-grad job with meaning? Join the 223 NYU alumni who started their careers with Teach For America—and work from inside and outside the education sector to help make a great education a reality for all. TFA is growing the force of leaders committed to ensuring that all kids have an education that expands their opportunities and gives them more choices in life. You have the power to drive change in the classroom and beyond. Choose more and apply
 to the 2015 Teach For America corps. To learn more, visit www.teachforamerica.org and the Teach For America at NYU Facebook page.

Required to apply:

  • Bachelor’s degree by June 2015
  • Minimum 2.5 cumulative undergraduate GPA
  • Citizen, national, or lawful permanent resident of the United States, or have received Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals
  • Candidates of all backgrounds, academic majors, and career interests encouraged to apply
  • No educational coursework or certification required to apply

 

Meet the Panelists: Arts Professions Panel

Meet the Panelists: Arts Professions Panel, Tuesday, October 21st, 12:30-1:30 with Joe Kluger

On Tuesday, October 21st, the NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development will host an Arts Professions Panel for students who are interested in the arts, design and entertainment industries. One of the panelists for the event will be Joe Kluger, a Principal of WolfBrown. Joe holds an M.A. in Arts Administration from NYU and a B.A. in Music from Trinity College in Hartford.

We asked Mr. Kluger for his personal career advice for students who want to work in the arts. His advice:

  • Do something you are really good at and that matches your strength.
  • Do something you love (i.e. in an art form you’re passionate about).
  • Be clear about what your work parameters and values are.
  • Maintain patience and perseverance in the pursuit of short and long-term career goals that you set for yourself.
  • Remain flexible and open to new opportunities.

Before his consulting career, Joe was the President of The Philadelphia Orchestra Association, where he helped develop the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts and raised over $130 million for endowment. Among many leadership positions he holds, Joe is an internationally recognized expert in the use of technology to accomplish strategic objectives in the arts. He has provided advice in this area to organizations such as the League of American Orchestras and OPERA America and their members.

If you’re interested in the arts, make sure to RSVP for the Arts Professions Panel (Tuesday, October 21st, 12:30-1:30) through NYU CareerNet!

Three Ways To Make The Most Of Your Career Fair

Murshed Chowdhury acts as an advisor to both companies and individuals who are looking for assistance in technology talent acquisition and development. He has served as the CEO & Partner of Infusive Solutions Inc. since its establishment in 2001. Prior to Infusive, he worked at several recruiting agencies where he honed his skills and rose the ranks within the organization before founding his own company.

With over 15 years of technology placement experience, Murshed has helped secure some of the most competitive technical positions for his clients at some of the world’s most prestigious firms. He holds a Bachelors Degree in Political Science from Fordham University.

Murshed is passionate about helping technologists develop themselves both professionally and technically.

Here, he shares valuable insight into achieving career fair success. Think about his tips as you prepare for the next NYU Career Fair.

Recently, our company had a table at a career fair and I noticed that many of the students had a puzzled look on their face. One student caught my attention in particular. I asked her, “What are you looking to do?” This is typical company talk at a career fair, and she responded, “I have no idea, and I really don’t know what I’m supposed to do here.” We then spent the next few minutes discussing what she majored in, but more importantly, what she liked and what interested her.  After that, we came up with a game plan where I told her to visit the various companies that were present to see if they had roles that were closely aligned to what she wanted. I told her to have some real conversations, to get representatives’ business cards and if there was interest, she should follow up. Focus on quality versus quantity, because at the end of the day, you really need one job. You hopefully get many offers, but only need to work at one company. After a few hours, she came back to our booth to tell me that she found some really good prospects, met some really good people and had some genuine conversations.  She went on to say that the career fair was not that intimidating after all, and that, actually, it was kind of fun. She said, from now on, she would make the most of her career fairs and try to use it as a vehicle to further her career.

The career fair for many first time or recurring students can be a daunting task. I remember my first one as a senior in college. You’re told to make a great impression; how exactly is unclear. You’re told to make multiple copies of your resume, dress professionally and go. That’s pretty much the advice I was given.  When I actually walked into the conference hall, I saw a lot of unfamiliar faces, got nervous and wasn’t sure what do next.

So, how do you make the most of your career fair experience? It really comes down to 3 simple steps in my opinion: have a plan, meet (network) and effectively follow up.

PLAN

Like any other successful outcomes, it all starts with proper planning. Do some research once the career services center makes available the list of companies that are visiting your institution. Then, put together a list of the companies you want to meet with and find out where they will be. Some career fairs are so large, they can have companies housed in different buildings.  Map it out and really have a game plan. If you are going with a friend, ask them to split up and see where the crowds are and then come early or stay late to meet with them. The goal is to have some quality conversations, not just say hello and give them your resume. Part of your planning should include research so you can differentiate yourself from the competition. Knowing about what a company does can go a long way in building rapport. As most people ask the quintessential, “What do you do?” question, you are unique when you can walk up to an employer and tell them you are aware of what their business does because you’ve done your homework. I can tell you for a fact, that students who took the time to research my company and me, in some cases, always got more attention from me. Their resumes went to the top of the pile. I’m sure it is no different for other employers as well.  That leads me to my next point, which is, if you have the information on who will be attending from the company, please research them. It shows two things on your part: one, that you’re serious, and two, you are willing to go above and beyond but what most people are willing to do. In today’s digital age of social media and particularly, LinkedIn, that information is readily available.

NETWORK

Next, you should allocate time to meet with as many companies as you can. If you are like most college students, and people for that matter, you’re probably familiar with the big brand companies. But don’t overlook a really great startup or fast growing company that might be perfect for you. There are amazing opportunities at some of these lesser-known brands, as well. Remember, all big brands were small at one point, you never know where this company may go. Also, they wouldn’t be at the career fair if they weren’t growing and looking for great talent like you. Speak to the representatives of these companies and find out what they do. Get their business cards…why, I’ll get to shortly. Be curious and explore, the information you find about these firms, their product and services, can help you narrow down some of your choices, and help you decide what you might be interested in doing once you graduate.

FOLLOW UP

Finally, you need to make sure you effectively follow up. For those companies you’re keen on, send a quick email thanking them for meeting with you and express your interest in the next steps of their process. A week later, follow up with a phone call and reiterate your interest in the firm and/or opportunity. Now, going back to why I asked you to collect those cards, send an email to all the people you met with, even if you’re unsure about the firm or company. Ask them to please forward your information on to anyone they feel may have an interest in your background. Remember, just because that person may not have the ideal role for you at their organization doesn’t mean they don’t have a network of contacts that can be beneficial to you. By making a good impression, and effectively following up, you will already be ahead of your fellow students. Lack of effective follow up is one of the biggest ways to pass on potential opportunities. Most people do a poor job of this. Why? I have no idea, but in any case, this can be an opportunity for you. If you start, you stand to gain. Remember, successful people don’t just focus on doing great things, they make a concentrated effort to do the small things really great, and with consistency. It’s the little things that matter. Keep doing them well and often, and the results will speak for themselves.

Make the career fairs work for you. Remember, they are there to find you, so make the how and why as easy for them as possible.

Put these newly learned skills to good use! Attend the 2014 Fall Hospitality, Tourism, and Sports Management Career Fair! RSVP HERE!