Category Archives: Wasserman Events

4 Truths About Taking a Gap Year

Compiled by Project Horseshoe Farm Fellows ‘15-’16 and written by Melissa Luong

Melissa Luong recently graduated from Binghamton University. She is now pursuing a one-year fellowship at Project Horseshoe Farm in Greensboro, Alabama before entering graduate school next fall. 

Fellows at Project Horseshoe Farm pursue a one or two year gap-year fellowship serving vulnerable community members by focusing on education, leadership, and community. As we came together and brainstormed about our experiences, we reflected on the last five months of our gap year. We came up with 4 important things that everyone should consider when pursuing a gap year between college graduation and graduate studies. 

1. You don’t have to go abroad.

This is the ever-popular choice for a gap year, but it isn’t your only option. Traveling and/or doing a year of service is just as accessible in the United States. Regionally, the U.S. has many differences and unique cultures. Only two of the nine fellows are originally from the South. The rest of us are from California, Michigan, New York, and Pennsylvania. We’ve been learning so much about the culture, traditions, and food that the South values. None of the fellows have lived in a rural area before this gap year and we’re learning that cows escape from their pastures more often than you think.

2.  Explore every option.

Don’t keep yourself in a narrow frame of mind. Last year, a current fellow (then a graduating senior) only went to our information session because she was curious. What we imagined for ourselves after graduation while we were in college isn’t exactly what all of us are doing. Many of us never intended to move to a small town in the Deep South. If we were to tell the freshmen versions of ourselves that we’d be moving to a rural community in Alabama, most of us would be pretty shocked. However, we are enjoying our time in a place which is different from what we’ve experienced before. Take a chance on an unconventional opportunity.

3. College doesn’t teach you everything.

Think of your gap year as a transitional year. We are using our gap year to figure out if the professional ambitions we developed in college are truly what we want to pursue. It seems like a better option than pursuing graduate training and then finding out that what we thought we wanted isn’t really what we want anymore.

4. Be open to new experiences and people. 

Consider what you want from your gap-year. You’ve spent a good few years earning your degree in an environment in which you’ve grown accustomed to certain things. Learn to challenge yourself so that you can be receptive and understanding to experiences and people different from you. Our fellows are from all over the United States and are alumni of Ivy League schools, small liberal-art colleges, and state schools. Even more so, we are meeting community members who, at first glance, are so unlike us that it seems a friendship would be difficult. We find that this isn’t the case at all. We’re pushing ourselves to understand and empathize with everyone we meet and we’ve been welcomed very warmly.

Hopefully, these truths that we’ve imparted will help you formulate an idea of if and what kind of gap year is best for you.  Best of luck, class of 2016!

To learn more about Project Horseshoe Farm and this exciting gap year experience for students interested in healthcare, education, or social entrepreneurial leadership, check out their info session at Wasserman on November 9 at 3:30pm.

My Fulbright to Bulgaria: Teaching English and Cultural Exchange

Ariel Bloomer is a first year master’s student of Higher Education and Student Affairs at NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. She graduated with a B.A. in creative writing from Scripps College in California, and spent the following year teaching English in Bulgaria. More insights on her Fulbright year can be found on her blog, the Unintentional Explorer (http://unintentionalexplorer.wordpress.com/).

I may be a Steinhardt master’s student now, but I still clearly remember the existential stress of my senior year of undergrad where I had to decide what to do after graduation. Over the course of my undergraduate studies, I had discovered and indulged interests in student affairs, writing, travel, and religious studies. Knowing what I was interested in was a first step, but knowing what do with those interests… it was like unfamiliar choreography.

I applied for programs to teach abroad because my curiosity about the world was the most insistent. I was fortunate to be awarded a Fulbright fellowship to teach English in Bulgaria. The Fulbright U.S. Student Program offers research/study and English teaching grants to U.S. citizens that have earned Bachelor’s degrees. Although it is a teaching program, Fulbright seeks applicants who have various levels of teaching experience and do not require applicants to have completed a degree in education. For instance, I had little experience with teaching. However, some countries do look for applicants with previous teaching experience.

I decided Fulbright was the right program for me because its mission so closely matched my own. The Fulbright program, under the U.S. Department of State, has a goal to increase mutual understanding between citizens of the U.S. and those of countries around the world. As a writer, this goal of cross-cultural communication spoke to me. I knew that Bulgaria, often-neglected in the realm of travel writing, would offer fertile ground for me to practice creative non-fiction in my spare time.

 In addition, I saw the Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship Program as an opportunity to try on a new role in the field of education and immerse myself in a new culture and language. It was also an opportunity to use the skills I had learned in Balkan Dance, a class I thought would not be useful beyond satisfying my fine art requirement. This course influenced my desire to apply to teach English in Bulgaria. Somewhere in Bulgaria was a choreography I at least sort of knew.

 In the year I spent abroad in Smolyan, in the Rhodope Mountains where Bulgaria meets Greece, I did not learn to teach. My hit-and-miss lessons were more misses than hits. I did build lasting relationships with teachers and students, facilitated a creative writing club at a high school, spent the fall attending weekly folkdance classes with a Geography teacher from my school, and I learned to cook some of Bulgaria’s unique dishes, a blend of Slavic, Turkish, and Mediterranean fare. I read extensively, took an online travel writing course, and kept a detailed journal. I traveled the Balkan Peninsula by bus and train. I learned that my passion for education is geared towards student development outside of the classroom. This led me to pursue a master’s degree in higher education and student affairs. More so, Fulbright helped to fine tune my research interests in student outcomes in, and access to, international education.

Now that I contemplate a doctoral program in my not-so-distant future, I wonder if Fulbright will again be a part of my journey forward. I taught English through my grant, but the program also offers research opportunities for those with a Bachelor’s degree to conduct independent projects abroad. It is a unique opportunity to follow a passion, carry out grant-funded research, serve as a U.S. cultural ambassador, and learn a dance you never knew before.

 To learn more about the Fulbright U.S. Student Program, attend an upcoming Fulbright Information Session for Graduate Students at The Wasserman Center (133 East 13th Street, 2nd Floor, Presentation Room B) on Thursday March 12th from 1pm to 2pm. RSVP Today!

Myths vs. Facts: The Truth About Landing a Job in STEM

Myths vs. Facts! Breaking down the common misconceptions, urban legends, and false facts around landing a job in STEM fields!

MYTH #1: There are only Engineering jobs for Computer Science majors.

Fact: Two of the fastest-growing engineering fields, industrial engineering and petroleum engineering, staff two of the largest proportions of older workers. In both, 25% of currently employed workers are 55 years or older. Industrial engineers are vital to many manufacturing firms that struggle to find the right technically oriented talent, so the aging workforce is a threat. Petroleum engineering, meanwhile, has had a noticeable undersupply of graduates coming into the marketplace in the last few years. So, among many other fields, these two fastest-growing engineering fields are looking to hire recent graduates. To help you find jobs within your major, the Wasserman Center hosts several networking opportunities with employers looking to hire students majoring in a variety of fields including Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Civil Engineering. Make sure to check NYU CareerNet for any upcoming opportunities.

MYTH #2: Engineering students can’t join professional clubs or work during school.

Fact: Engineering students study most of the time, but not ALL of the time. The number of hours recommended for study and revision in engineering is similar to any other degree: 10 hours per course. So unless you’re doing a conjoint or accelerated pathway, you would be taking four courses per semester, hence committing to a total of 40 hours of study per week, including your lecture times. So join a professional organization or club, work some exercise in, network with employers through On Campus Recruitment; but most of all, enjoy your time in college and develop some transferrable skills.

MYTH #3: There is no variety of study or concentration in Engineering.

Fact: Branches of engineering include aerospace, biomedical, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, environmental, forensic, genetic, mechanical, military, nuclear, reverse, software, and structural. 

MYTH #4: There are no examples of women in Engineering who have created something cool and innovative.

Fact: The first computer program was predicted by Ada Lovelace in a paper she published in 1843. Ada suggested the plan for calculating Bernoulli numbers with a new calculating engine called the “Analytical Engine”. Between 1842 and 1843, she translated an article by Italian military engineer Luigi Menabrea on the engine, which she supplemented with an elaborate set of notes of her own, simply called Notes. These notes contain what many consider to be the first computer program—that is, an algorithm designed to be carried out by a machine. Lovelace’s notes are important in the early history of computers. If you’re interested in meeting and speaking with an all-women panel of professionals and alumnae within STEM careers, check out the upcoming Women in STEM Career Panel on March 4th, from 4:30pm to 6:30pm.

Learn more about the Engineering/Technology/Computer Science/Info Systems/Construction Management/Entrepreneurship industries by attending these events:

Making It In: Tech, February 17th, 12:00pm-1:30pm

IBM Watson Day at NYU School of Engineering, February 19th, 9:30am-6:00pm

Corporate Presentation: Vitech Systems Group, Inc., February 19th, 4:00pm-5:15pm

 

Myths vs. Facts: The Truth About Landing a Job in Hospitality

Myths vs. Facts:  Breaking down the misconceptions, urban legends, and false facts around the job search process in the hospitality industry.

MYTH #1: I have to work in a hotel to have a career in hospitality.

Fact:  While working in a hotel is one option for many students, there are other limitless alternatives.  The hospitality industry offers a variety of careers including opportunities at tourism boards, online travel companies such as Orbitz and Expedia, events and entertainment companies as well as hospitality marketing and consulting agencies.

MYTH #2:  All hospitality careers are in food and beverage service.

Fact:  There are actually many sides to hospitality: corporate positions, which include business development, brand strategy, and revenue management for the organization, and front-line positions that consist of event management, guest relations, and operations management.  The great benefit of working in the hospitality industry is that there are numerous dynamic and specialized career paths to explore.

MYTH #3: I can use the same resume and cover letter for each hospitality position.

Fact:  Students need to tailor each resume and cover letter to reflect the position and organization they are applying for. Submitting a focused cover letter and resume highlighting company specific trends, hospitality coursework and projects, as well as your passion for the career path is key to setting yourself apart and grabbing the eye of an industry recruiter.  Schedule a coaching appointment to have your resume and cover letter reviewed by a Wasserman Center Career Coach.

MYTH #4:  Only students with hospitality experience will land positions.

Fact:  While internships are very important in the hospitality industry, employers are also looking for transferable skills from previous professional and academic experiences. Students with experience in another industry should highlight skills specific to hospitality on their resume and in their cover letter.  For example, skills including customer service, project management, sales, teamwork, and budgeting are important in most hospitality positions but can be gained in other fields. Your goal is to show an employer that you understand the needs of the industry and necessary skills to be successful.

MYTH #5:  Students don’t have to network in the hospitality industry.

Fact:  Approximately 75% of students find positions through networking with alumni, professors, friends, and previous colleagues.  Building relationships is vital to gaining contacts that provide opportunities within the hospitality industry.  During your job search you should set a goal to grow and develop your professional network by identifying individuals that you know and who are within your reach.  Students should also take advantage of the NYU Professional Mentor Network and industry events available through the Wasserman Center.  In addition, professional associations such as Hospitality Sales and Marketing Association International (HSMAI) and Global Business Travel Association (GBTA) are great resources to learn about industry trends and networking events.

Learn more about the hospitality industry by attending these Wasserman Center events:

Building a Career in Events, Entertainment, & Travel, February 12th 4:00-5:30p.m.

NYU Hospitality & Tourism Industry Expo, February 23rd 4:00-6:00p.m.

Employer Insight: 5 Things to Expect at a Startup

 

Susan Zheng is the co-founder and CEO of Lynxsy, a mobile recruitment marketplace for companies to hire junior, non-technical talent. Previously, she was an early employee at Tough Mudder where she helped the company grow from 10 to 200 in two years. She graduated from NYU Stern with a degree in Finance and International Business.

Career advice: Take chances, and don’t worry if your career doesn’t follow a formula. The most successful people in history have had non-linear careers.

5 Things to Expect at a Startup

As a soon-to-be or recent grad, you’re chomping at the bit to jump into the workforce. You’ve got a stellar resume and awesome references, but where to begin?

You could take the typical route of college grads and pound the pavement in pursuit of a corporate gig. But maybe you’re looking for a little more excitement and a little less routine, a company that veers off the beaten path and forges its own trail. If you want to be a part of something from the ground up, a startup could be just the place to launch your career.

What exactly will it mean to work at a new uncharted business? Before you fire off your resume, you should know a little bit about what you’re getting into. Here’s a list of five things you can expect—and look forward to—if you work at a startup:

1) Be Ready to Wear Many Hats

When your team is small, as it inevitably will be in the beginning, you’ll likely be assigned tasks not directly in your line of duty. One moment you might be doing competitor research, the next you might be negotiating vendor agreements and the next you could be ordering toilet paper for the office. In your daily grind, you’ll undoubtedly get to dig into projects that would be out of reach in a typical entry-level position.

2)  Change Is the Only Constant

In the world of startups, change is the only constant—so you’d better be flexible. The company could decide to pivot in a new direction. Or employee growth could make you go from the sole business development associate to the head of sales in a matter of weeks. It might be as simple as changing priorities from mid-morning to the afternoon. If it pains you to switch gears all day long, or you’re on the retentive side when it comes to your to-do list, then steer clear. But if you’re game for variety, you’ve got the startup mentality.

3) 100% Mindshare

You won’t be punching a clock the same way you would at an established company.  Startups have a smaller window to get results, which may mean logging extra hours to ramp up the business. Your contributions won’t be confined to the office—if you even have one— and your schedule will probably include late-night brainstorming sessions over pizza. More than your hours, your passion and productivity will be key. You should expect to have 100% mindshare, which may involve eating, breathing and sleeping with the wellbeing of the company on your mind.

4) The Payoff

You shouldn’t join a startup solely on the off chance it could be the next big social network. Join one because you want to roll up your sleeves and be involved in the thrilling nitty-gritty of growing a business. You can make an average entry-level salary ($35K-$45K) and have the opportunity to earn a small equity share in the business. Not all startups will enjoy outrageous success, but those that excel tend to generously reward the individuals who have invested their time and talents to grow the business. Financial compensation aside, you are getting the chance to be involved in something awesome, so enjoy the journey.

5) Unlimited Potential

Career trajectory at a startup isn’t linear. There may be no distinct corporate ladder to climb, but there’s the potential for a big upside if you’re smart, motivated and committed. You could start in customer service and be promoted to managing the entire 20 person customer service team in 3 months. Once you prove yourself, you’ll rise in the organization and gain valuable skills and experience.  If the company takes off, you’ll be invited along for the ride.

Sound exciting and worth a gander? Go for it—make the bold move and explore opportunities with a startup today. If you don’t know where to begin, start your search with Lynxsy.

Would you like to meet  Susan Zheng, co-founder and CEO of Lynxsy? Attend the What’s Next Entrepreneurship Career Panel – Wednesday, Nov. 5th at 5:30pm. RSVP here!

Meet the Arts Professions Panelists: October 21st, with Cheryl Krugel-Lee, Deena Sami, Katarina Wong and Michael George

On Tuesday, October 21st, the NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development will host an Arts Professions Panel for students who are interested in the arts, design and entertainment industries. Among the panelists will be Cheryl Krugel-Lee, Deena Sami, Katarina Wong and Michael George. 

Cheryl Krugel-Lee

Cheryl Krugel-Lee is a Brooklyn-based composer, arranger, and orchestrator, whose work spans both the commercial and classical worlds. Cheryl earned her Bachelor of Music from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and her Master of Music degree from New York University, where she studied primarily with Ira Newborn. She has composed scores for theatre productions and films, orchestrated for musical theatre, collaborated with choreographers and created numerous works for a concert setting. Cheryl has had her music performed at Carnegie Hall, Jones Hall in Houston, Texas, Dixon Place, and The Actors Temple Theatre. Cheryl’s professional advice for students interested in careers in the arts would be:

    • To pursue their artistic goals.
    • To get involved with the arts administration of an organization as these organizations can offer opportunities from within that might not be available to people not working in that specific environment. On the other hand, in case one decides that he/she is no longer interested in pursuing a purely artistic career, having experience at an arts organization helps later on with other kinds of work.

Deena Sami

Deena Sami is currently an Associate Producer for CNN’s Anderson Cooper 360. Deena graduated with double majors in Journalism and Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies and minored in Politics. She interned anywhere she could get her feet in and gained “real world” experiences that she believes are crucial to landing a job. Deena’s passion for “everything Middle East and Egypt” led her to pursue a thesis on the 2011 Egyptian revolution. On an unrelated note: she’s an (amateur) foodie and started an (amateur) blog chronicling her creations in the kitchen! 

Katarina Wong

Katarina studied Classics and Philosophy at St. John’s College and, until recently, was the Director of Community and Curatorial Engagement at Edelman, the largest global PR firm, where she started their corporate art collection and art gallery as a Curator. Katarina will be launching her new business MADE on 10/16, which is dedicated to making art collecting more social.

Her personal and professional advice to students is:

  • Follow your curiosity even if it leads out of your primary area of specialty.
  • Be generous with your colleagues, whether it’s sharing information, donating your time or being supportive. In fact, on a networking level, artists, freelance designers, and many others in the arts industry are small business owners, so be smart.
  • Be knowledgeable. Don’t shy away from learning about marketing, legal issues that affect your future work (e.g., contracts, consignment agreements), taxes (and deductions!), etc.

Michael George

Michael George is a freelance editorial portrait and travel photographer based in Brooklyn, who graduated with a degree in Photography & Imaging from the NYU Tisch School of the Arts in 2011. Michael currently runs his own business and works for clients such as WIRED, Runner’s World, and Hello Mr. magazine. Mr. George’s career advice for aspiring artists is:

  • To pursue personal projects alongside the work that helps keep financial stability. As you keep your passion alive for the work you really care about, eventually your paid and personal work will be one in the same.
  • Prove your skills to a possible hiring manager. For example, if you want to make travel work, pinch your pennies and travel.
  • Be patient. You will invest a lot and you will often fail, but you have to give yourself the necessary time as every industry forces you into years of paying your dues before you feel like your head is above water. Not everyone is going to be the next Ryan McGinley. Success is a strange mix of luck, networking, and incredibly hard work.

To hear more from these great panelists, make sure to RSVP  for the Arts Professions Panel (Tuesday, October 21st, 12:30-1:30) through CareerNet!

Meet the Panelists: Arts Professions Panel

Meet the Panelists: Arts Professions Panel, Tuesday, October 21st, 12:30-1:30 with Joe Kluger

On Tuesday, October 21st, the NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development will host an Arts Professions Panel for students who are interested in the arts, design and entertainment industries. One of the panelists for the event will be Joe Kluger, a Principal of WolfBrown. Joe holds an M.A. in Arts Administration from NYU and a B.A. in Music from Trinity College in Hartford.

We asked Mr. Kluger for his personal career advice for students who want to work in the arts. His advice:

  • Do something you are really good at and that matches your strength.
  • Do something you love (i.e. in an art form you’re passionate about).
  • Be clear about what your work parameters and values are.
  • Maintain patience and perseverance in the pursuit of short and long-term career goals that you set for yourself.
  • Remain flexible and open to new opportunities.

Before his consulting career, Joe was the President of The Philadelphia Orchestra Association, where he helped develop the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts and raised over $130 million for endowment. Among many leadership positions he holds, Joe is an internationally recognized expert in the use of technology to accomplish strategic objectives in the arts. He has provided advice in this area to organizations such as the League of American Orchestras and OPERA America and their members.

If you’re interested in the arts, make sure to RSVP for the Arts Professions Panel (Tuesday, October 21st, 12:30-1:30) through NYU CareerNet!

Student Perspective: Wasserman Center Connecting with Graduate Students

Mai Huynh is a Master’s student in the Industrial/Organizational Psychology program at GSAS. In case you missed it, below she recaps the Graduate Student Welcome Reception at Wasserman.

This year, the Wasserman Center is making an active effort to connect with graduate students by introducing them to its resources right when they first arrive on campus. On August 28th, the Wasserman Center hosted a Graduate Student Welcome Reception filled with lots of food and information. The idea for the welcome reception came from the creative brainstorming efforts of the Wasserman Graduate Student Advisory Board, a group of student representatives doing the NYU graduate community proud by coming up with amazing ways to professionally develop students.

Over 180 graduates from GSAS, Steinhart, Nursing, School of Professional Studies, and Polytechnic School of Engineering (to name a few) participated in the event. They heard from Richard Orbe-Austin, the new Director of Graduate Student Career Development and learned about how to schedule a career coaching appointment, register for on-campus recruitment (OCR), and sign up for career seminars and events.

During the session, graduate students were given an opportunity to network with their peers and discuss the different roles they play in their life, such as graduate student, son/daughter, city-dweller, etc. The reception concluded with a guided tour of Wasserman’s facilities. Students were ecstatic to find out where they could grab some free coffee. Overall, it was a great day and fantastic way to spread the word about what Wasserman can do for graduate students.

Are you a graduate student at NYU? Take these steps to get connected with our office: 

Wasserman Graduate Student Advisory Board

Lei Lei is a second year student in the Master of Science program in Information Systems. He is also a student worker at the Wasserman Center and a member of the Wasserman Graduate Student Advisory Board.  

Lei Lei - Student in the Master of Science program in Information Systems

The Wasserman Graduate Student Career Development Team asked Lei what his favorite things are about the Wasserman Center, and here is what he said:

1. Extremely helpful career coaching (both walk-ins and appointments).

2. Close contact with employers by attending the Employer Information Sessions.

3. Free printing, free coffee, and free place to take a rest (nowhere else on campus can combine these three in one place)!

Want to learn more about the Wasserman Center resources and services for graduate students?

Attend the Graduate Student Welcome Reception at Wasserman! Thursday, August 28th from 9-10:30 am!

The NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development is located at:

133 E 13th St #2, New York, NY

Connect with graduate students from across the university and expand your NYU network at NYU Wasserman’s Graduate Student Welcome Reception! Participants will also learn about the many programs, resources and services that the Wasserman Center for Career Development offers for graduate students. Breakfast will be served. Please RSVP here.

Looking to get more involved? Join the Graduate Student Advisory Board

DEADLINE: September 15th Job ID 942466 (Graduate students only)
The Wasserman Center is in search of outstanding graduate (Master’s and PhD) student volunteers to partner directly with the Wasserman Center team to address the career goals and needs of graduate students across the university.

Pernod Richard Challenge Winner

Mayank Trivedi, a Masters student in Integrated Marketing in the School of Continuing and Professional Studies, shares his experience with a corporate competition.

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A few weeks ago, Pernod Ricard, a conglomerate that produces distilled beverages, came to the Wasserman Center with a student challenge. You may be more familiar with some of the brands such as: Becherovka, Chivas Regal, The Glenlivet, Jameson, Ballantine’s, Kahlua, Malibu, etc.

Pernod Ricard’s challenge was called “How to Reduce Drunk Driving” and while they were giving their presentation at the Wasserman Center and telling us the details of the challenge, my brain was already producing ideas.  What could be a better idea than a Mobile app which can provide answers to your questions when you need a ride home after a night out?

Their selection criteria was awesome: the first step was to submit a draft of your idea. They received several ideas from different schools in United States before the top three ideas were selected and able to give a final presentation.

GUESS what? I was selected in the top 3 and I was motivated enough to make my selection a victory. My idea was simple, yet innovative and engaging. I worked for almost a week on my presentation to make it clear, precise and informative. I designed a blueprint of my idea and divided it into different sections in my presentation to give a clear perspective of what features every section of the App possesses.

Finally, the day came and I presented my idea in front of company executives. They appeared to appreciate my idea and I thought things went well. I was then asked to wait for further communication.

A couple of days after, I received an email from the company inviting me to the French American Entrepreneurship Award ceremony where they were going to announce the top two winners. I was so excited, happy and confident about the fact that my ideas were deemed worthwhile.

On the day of the decision, I went to the award ceremony with one of my friends and we enjoyed some lively wines and delicious food. The executives who viewed my presentation came to meet me and shared some praise about my presentation. They also introduced me to some other members of the company and guests. I was feeling proud when people took pictures with me and praised my idea.

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Later, the award ceremony started and the VP of Communications was going to announce the top two names of the student challenge. He started “We received some great ideas, but I had high expectations from these two schools and they proved it – the top two winners of 2014 Pernod Ricard Student Challenge are New York University and Columbia University”.  The smile on my face was BIG enough to be seen by everyone. We were then called on stage and were honored with a certificate.

It was a great experience and I’ll advise all my fellow students to keep looking for these kinds of business challenges and competitions. You will get to learn a lot and it will add a great value to your resume.