Category Archives: Internships

Student Spotlight Series

Isaac

Isaac Donis is a student at the Tandon School of Engineering, studying Electrical Engineering for the Class of 2017. He’s a Summer Intern at Goldman Sachs.

“Working at Goldman Sachs introduced me to the diverse career choices for engineering students. It taught me that what you do in college is only the beginning of what there is to learn. I’m excited for the experiences and new skills my future career will bring me.”

Are you an NYU student with an interesting summer internship? If so, email career.communications@nyu.edu and you might be featured on our social media.

Profile of a Wasserman Center Internship Grant Recipient

Micaela
Micaela Vorchheimer (SPS ’17) is a first year graduate student at the School of Professional Studies, pursuing a degree in Global Affairs focusing on human rights and gender studies. Micaela has worked as Vice Chair of the Legal Department of the NGO TECHO and as paralegal of Marval, O’Farrell & Mairal law firm. Prior to graduate school, she obtained a Law degree at University of Buenos Aires with concentration in private law. This past fall, Micaela interned at the Americas Division at Human Rights Watch.

1) What was it like being an Americas Intern at Human Rights Watch (HRW)?

As an Americas Intern I was responsible for a broad range of duties including conducting research, writing memos, doing media coverage, transcriptions, translations, responding to inquiries, and monitoring current events in Latin America. I worked with the direct guidance and supervision of the Americas researchers. The whole experience was unparalleled. HRW’s NY office is located in the fabulous Empire State Building. Working surrounded with those stunning views was unbelievable. Moreover, in February, all Americas researchers gathered for the Annual Summit in New York, and I got the opportunity to meet them.

2) What was the most challenging or rewarding part of the internship?

The thing I enjoy most about my internship at HRW is that I am able to talk with researchers of other teams and learn about their work every day. Through this interaction, I am exposed to different topics and learn how research is done around the world. Moreover, all researchers, associates and interns focus on empowering each other to get the job done. The most challenging part of my internship was helping with the transcription of long interviews of people whose rights were undermined. That task was time-consuming and emotionally exhausting, but when the report was released, I felt the greatest reward.

3) Why should other students apply for the Wasserman Center Internship Grant?

From a financial point of view, a career in human rights is very challenging and many students do internships and volunteer without decent wage. The Wasserman Center Internship Grant can make a difference in your budget and help pursuing your goals. For example, the WCIG will help you alleviate the daily financial stress, fund expenses, bills, and rent payments. Additionally, from a career development perspective, I strongly suggest that students make the right move and follow their true passion. In doing so, they will succeed, go beyond what is required, and even enjoy it. Also, we should not forget that not everyone gets the chance to chose their career path. Therefore, if a student has a true calling, she or he should go for it. “You Only Live Once,” right?

4) Non-paying Internship Survival 101 tip:

Important life lesson: bring your own snack & food to work! It simply doesn’t make economic sense to go out for lunch. In addition, try to unify the hours of the internship in a few days so as to save time and money. Finally, do not forget to make friends! They will make your day more fun and the entire experience unforgettable from every point of view.

The Wasserman Center Internship Grant was established to provide financial assistance ($1000) to students pursuing non-paying internships within not-for-profits, the arts, education, public service and other industries that do not traditionally pay their interns. For more information, the application and eligibility criteria can be found on NYU CareerNet under Job ID #1028609. The application deadline is June 21, 2016 at 11:59pm EST. Please keep in mind this is a competitive process.

Please review these FAQs and contact wassermaninternshipgrant@nyu.edu with any questions.

Tips From a Wasserman Center Internship Grant Winner

Achuth Krishnan Sreedevi is a graduate student at the School of Engineering, NYU. He is interning at the United Nations Department of Public Information. He is a part of the United Nations Academic Impact division which allies itself with universities across the world to promote education and research as a tool against social injustice. As a past recipient of the Wasserman Center Internship Grant, he shares some insight into the value of applying for the Grant, and offers some tips to further your candidacy.

 

What was it like working at the United Nations Academic Impact?

Every day I work with the top minds of the world along with leaders in the field of education and research towards new ways to address global issues. I recently got the opportunity to walk up and speak at the rostrum of the General Assembly. I will be chasing that high for a long time. My thoughts on international matters were appreciated to the extent that I have been featured frequently on the United Nations Academic Impact website and newsletter. This went on to find me a place as co-editor of the newsletter.  I go to sleep every night knowing that I’ve done at least the smallest share to making a positive impact on the world.  I will always be able to own up to these experiences. This has been invaluable to my future!

Why shouldn’t you shy away from a non-paying internship?

Some internships are paid and some just aren’t. This should never factor into your list of reasons for choosing an internship. The purpose of an internship is to give you a hint of what it would be like to work in that sector and to familiarize you with the organization. Do the work that you love to do. If you don’t love what you do, you cannot be successful at it because you will be competing with people who love that line of work. Choose an internship that takes you closer to where you want to be, doing what you want to do. Opportunities such as the Wasserman Centre Internship Grant are available to support you in your choices.

Why should you apply to the Wasserman Center Internship Grant?

An internship is a step towards our career and we should never sacrifice even the smallest step for a quick buck. While money should never be the reason to work, it can serve as recognition of your work and improve your life style. This means that you can be more focused on your work and less focused on your bank balance!  The Wasserman Center Internship Grant gives recognition to our work and supports us financially in our career aspirations.

What advice would you give for future applicants of the Wasserman Center Internship Grant?

If you love what you do, it will show in your passion and dedication to the organization and the quality of work you produce. Have a good relationship with your boss and show him that you are passionate about your work so that he will feel comfortable giving you a positive recommendation. Most importantly choose the right internship based on what resonates with you. The rest will follow. My best wishes to all future applicants!

Are you interning this semester? Whether or not you are getting paid, take Achuth’s advice on using your internship as an opportunity to learn more about your career interests. If your internship is non-paying, and at a not-for-profit organization or within an industry that does not typically pay interns (arts, entertainment, media, education), apply now for the Wasserman Center Internship Grant. Apply by Sep 29th at 11:59pm: NYU CareerNet Job ID #978082.

How to Get the Most out of your Summer Internship

Kelly Goss is a rising senior at NYU in Global Liberal Studies with minors in Psychology and French. She has studied abroad at NYU’s campuses in Paris and London.  Kelly has worked in editorial, marketing, publicity, and recruitment roles, and she is now excited to be interning with the Human Resources department at Time Inc (@TimeIncCareers). Follow her on Twitter @kgoss12 or on LinkedIn.

On June 1st, I sat in the auditorium of the Time and Life building with more than 100 other interns who had been selected to participate in Time Inc. summer internship program. Chief Human Resources Officer Greg Giangrande (@greggiangrande) made us excited to begin what we knew would be an unforgettable experience. He encouraged us to make the most of our ten weeks at one of the most influential media companies in the world, and throughout my time working in the HR department of Time Inc. I have always kept Greg’s words in mind.

For all of you who are also pursuing your dream internship this summer, here are my top seven tips, based on my own experience, for making the most of your summer internship.

Write down one goal for yourself

Entering your dream internship may feel overwhelming on your first day. When I started working at Time Inc. this summer, our orientation leaders had us write down one goal that we had for ourselves as we worked got ready to tackle our new roles. Goals can be anything from wanting to get coffee with a manager and learning a new skill to figuring out what role this industry is the right one for you. Keep your goal with you at your workspace to keep you motivated and focused on what you want to achieve during your internship.

Don’t be afraid to reach out to a senior manager

While it may be difficult to imagine, even those in the highest positions at your company started off right where you are as an intern. Don’t be afraid to send them an email asking if they have a quick moment to talk with you about your career questions. These higher-ups can provide you with crucial advice as you enter your career and they will be impressed with your initiative.

 

Network with your fellow interns – they are your future colleagues!

When interns are encouraged to network, they often are told to reach out to managers. While this type of networking is certainly important, interns seem to forget that connecting with their fellow interns can be just as important for job hunting in the future. Those who you intern with will be your colleagues when you enter the workforce and are an essential professional support network. Make time to eat lunch with the other interns in your company and connect with them on Linked In.

Explore the city you work in

For many interns, the city they work in for the summer is not where they attend college or where their family is from. Don’t forget that not only is your internship an opportunity to discover if a specific industry or position is right for you, but it is also a chance for you to explore whether or not your new city is one where you would like to live and work one day. Take the time on weekends and after work to explore some of the highlights of your city and to get to know the people who live there.  Research what industries are the most prominent in your city and how you can learn more about them. Ask yourself whether you could see yourself living there in the next five years.

Get lunch or coffee with someone new each week

As the weeks progress in your internship, you will most likely be working with the same team of people, or one person, on a daily basis. Often we can get comfortable interacting only with those who we immediately work with. Research other positions on your team or even in another department and make sure to reach out to those you would be interested in talking with. The more people you interact with and the more perspectives you are able to have, the more prepared you will be to make bigger career choices down the road.

Take Initiative to Help Your Team

If you notice that your department seems extra busy with a big project or transition, or if you ever finish your assignments with time to spare, take the initiative to think of ways in which you can help and ask your supervisor for feedback.  For example, if you know that your team wants to improve its social media, come up with a list of ideas for how they can gain more followers and present it to your manager. Think ahead and show your team that you are aware of their projects and can take the action steps needed to be an asset for them to reach their goals.

Keep in touch after your internship is over

One of the most important ways to have your summer internship make an impact on your future career is to keep in touch with those you worked with – managers, fellow interns, informational interviews, etc. Send a personalized message to these individuals on LinkedIn letting them know that you enjoyed working with them and would like to stay in touch. Keep them posted every few months on your career advancements and utilize them as a resource whenever you have industry questions. If they have a job open in the future you will already be on their mind as a candidate.

Interested in working with Time Inc.? Check out these current entry-level opportunities:

Social Media Producer with Sports Illustrated

Integrated Marketing Coordinator

An Internship Retrospective

Amanda Pires is a member of the Steinhardt Class of 2016 majoring in Media, Culture, and Communication and minoring in Producing.  Here, she offers some tips on making the most of your internship.  

This past semester, I was an intern at S2BN Entertainment, a New York based live event production company.  Over the course of my four months in the office, I thought about what I wish I knew about interning before I had started.  Here are some tips to help you make the most of your next few months.

  1. Set goals that will keep you motivated – Have a conversation with your supervisor at the start of your internship about what experience they think you will gain, and what experience you are hoping to gain. These goals may change over the course of the internship, but will help in keeping you on track and productive.  About halfway through my time at S2BN, I found that I wanted to work more with event marketing, and when I updated my goals, my supervisor was able to make that happen.
  2. Ask questions often – Your supervisor does not want you to be lost in the work.  They will always be willing to help and will be impressed that you are making the effort to get the task right.  An internship is about learning outside of the classroom, and sometimes your own questions can expand upon something that a book cannot.
  3. Work with different departments & teams – If possible, ask your supervisor for the opportunity to explore different aspects and work with various teams at the company; you never know which one you may click with.  At S2BN, I found that I loved working with the marketing department, which has allowed me to pursue positions that will give me more experience within the marketing sphere.
  4. Network within the office – Meet as many coworkers as you can, during lunch, at the end of the day, or on a coffee break.  Introduce yourself to those you may not work directly with – you never know who will share the same passion for football as you – and stay in touch after your internship is over.

Interning can be an extremely valuable experience – so make the most of it while you can!

Wasserman Center Internship Grant Summer 2015 FAQ

ARCHIVED: For updated information about the Wasserman Center Internship Grant, click here.

Still thinking of applying to the $1,000 Wasserman Center Internship Grant, but have some questions? Not to worry, see below! For any questions not covered below, please email us at wassermaninternshipgrant@nyu.edu.

Top Wasserman Center Internship Grant FAQs

  1. What is the Wasserman Center Internship Grant?
  2. Who is eligible?
  3. Is this internship only for students interning in not-for-profit organizations?
  4. When are the deadlines?
  5. If I have already applied, can I reapply to the WCIG?
  6. How can I apply?
  7. I recently started interning and my supervisor doesn’t know me well. Should he/she fill out the supervisor form?
  8. I have more than one internship and together I reach the eligibility requirements. Can I still apply?
  9. When are decisions made and checks mailed?

 Answers

1. What is the Wasserman Center Internship Grant?

The Wasserman Center Internship Grant (WCIG) was established to provide financial assistance to students pursuing non-paying internships in the arts, education, public service, not-for-profits and within other industries that do not traditionally pay their interns. Typically, the Wasserman Center is able to offer approximately 100-120 $1,000 grants during the fall, spring, and summer terms. Applications are reviewed by the Wasserman Center Internship Grant Committee and representatives from various NYU academic departments.

 2. Who is eligible?

Students must meet the following criteria to be eligible for a grant in the summer:

  • Undergraduate or graduate students currently enrolled in degree granting programs at NYU with at least a 3.0 GPA
  • Work a minimum of 20 hours per week for 8 weeks at a non-paying internship at a not-for-profit organization or within an industry that does not traditionally pay their interns in the US or abroad
  • Students must secure the internship prior to the application deadline

3. Is this internship only for students interning in not-for-profit organizations?

No. The WCIG is awarded to students interning at organizations that do not traditionally pay their interns which include the arts, fashion, media and journalism, etc.

4. When are the deadlines?

In general, the deadlines for the WCIG (NYC and Global) are as follows for each semester:

Semester

NYC

Global

Fall

Late September Early November

Spring

Mid/Late February Late March / Early April

Summer

Mid June Mid June (same application as US)

 

For the specific deadline, refer to the NYU CareerNet Job posting for the current semester. For Summer 2015, the Job ID# is 967073.

5. If I have already applied, can I reapply to the WCIG?  

If you have applied in the past, whether you did or did not receive the grant, you are able to apply as long as you meet the eligibility requirements.

6. Where and how can I apply?

To apply:

  • Log into NYU CareerNet
  • Download the attached word documents (Application and Supervisor Form) and provide the requested information.
  • Go to the “Jobs” tab to access the Wasserman Center Internship Grant posting – you can search “967073” in the keywords section.
  • Save as separate documents (PDF) and upload them in the “documents” section of NYU CareerNet.
  • After Application, Supervisor Form, and Resume are uploaded, click “APPLY” and select these documents from the drop down menu.
  • Complete required survey at this link: bit.ly/WCIGSummer2015

7. I recently started interning and my supervisor doesn’t know me well. Should he/she fill out the supervisor form?

The supervisor form is not due until the deadline; therefore, you can wait to send in the form. If your supervisor does not feel s/he has sufficient information, it is fine for supervisors to make recommendations based off of what they have currently observed. They may also want to include some thoughts concerning the criteria used in selecting you for your internship.

8. I have more than one internship and together I reach the eligibility requirements. Can I still apply?

Yes, you may apply as long as both internships are non-paying. You should submit  an application (make sure you list both internships and the number of hours and weeks you spend at each) and 2 Supervisor Authorization forms (one from each supervisor).

9. When are decisions made and checks mailed?

In general, decisions are made 1 month after the deadline. For Summer 2015, WCIG decisions will be released on July 21, 2015. In general, checks are mailed approximately 10 business days after decisions are made. For Summer 2015, checks will be mailed around August 5, 2015.

Wasserman Center Internship Grant FAQs

ARCHIVED: For updated information about the Wasserman Center Internship Grant, click here.

Still thinking of applying to the $1,000 Wasserman Center Internship Grant, but have some questions? Not to worry, see below! For any questions not covered below, please email us at wassermaninternshipgrant@nyu.edu.

Top 10 Wasserman Center Internship Grant FAQs

  1. What is the Wasserman Center Internship Grant?

  2. What is the difference between the Wasserman Center Internship Grant and the Wasserman Center Global Internship Grant?

  3. Who is eligible?

  4. Is this internship only for students interning in not-for-profit organizations?

  5. When are the deadlines?

  6. If I have already applied, can I reapply to the WCIG?

  7. How can I apply?

  8. I recently started interning and my supervisor doesn’t know me well. Should he/she fill out the supervisor form?

  9. I have more than one internship and together I reach the eligibility requirements. Can I still apply?

  10. When are decisions made and checks mailed?

Answers

  1. What is the Wasserman Center Internship Grant?

The Wasserman Center Internship Grant (WCIG) was established to provide financial assistance to students pursuing non-paying internships in the arts, education, public service, not-for-profits and within other industries that do not traditionally pay their interns. Typically, the Wasserman Center is able to offer approximately 100-120 $1,000 grants during the fall, spring, and summer terms. Applications are reviewed by the Wasserman Center Internship Grant Committee and representatives from various NYU academic departments.

  1. What is the difference between the Wasserman Center Internship Grant and the Global Internship Grant?

The Wasserman Center Global Internship Grant is for study away students only (including the Washington, DC site), while the WCIG is for all other students currently attending class on the New York campus.

  1. Who is eligible?

Students must meet the following criteria to be eligible for a grant in the fall or spring:

  • Undergraduate or graduate students currently enrolled and taking classes in degree granting programs at NYU with at least a 3.0 GPA

  • Work a minimum of 10 hours per week for 10 weeks at a non-paying internship at a not-for-profit organization or within an industry that does not traditionally pay their interns

  • Students must secure the internship prior to the application deadline

  • Note: Law, MBA, and Med school students are not eligible for the grant

Students must meet the following criteria to be eligible for a grant in the summer:

  • Undergraduate or graduate students currently enrolled in degree granting programs at NYU with at least a 3.0 GPA

  • Work a minimum of 20 hours per week for 8 weeks at a non-paying internship at a not-for-profit organization or within an industry that does not traditionally pay their interns

  • Students must secure the internship prior to the application deadline

  1. Is this internship only for students interning in not-for-profit organizations?

No. The WCIG is awarded to students interning at organizations that do not traditionally pay their interns which include the arts, fashion, media and journalism, etc.

  1. When are the deadlines?

In general, the deadlines for the WCIG (NYC and Global) are as follows for each semester:

Semester

NYC

Global

Fall

Late September

Early November

Spring

Mid/Late February

Late March / Early April

Summer

Mid June

Mid June

For the specific deadline, refer to the Wasserman Job and Internship page.

  1. If I have already applied, can I reapply to the WCIG?  

If you have applied in the past, whether you did or did not receive the grant, you are able to apply as long as you meet the eligibility requirements.

  1. Where and how can I apply?

To apply:

  • Log into NYU CareerNet

  • Go to the “Jobs” tab to access the Wasserman Center Internship Grant posting – you can search for the grant in the keywords section.

  • Download the attached word documents (Application and Supervisor Form) and provide the requested information.

    • Save as separate documents (PDF) and upload them in the “documents” section of NYU CareerNet.

    • After Application, Supervisor Form, and Resume are uploaded, click “APPLY” and select these documents from the drop down menu.

    • Complete the required survey included in the job posting on CareerNet.

  1. I recently started interning and my supervisor doesn’t know me well. Should he/she fill out the supervisor form?

The supervisor form is not due until the deadline; therefore, you can wait to send in the form. If your supervisor does not feel s/he has sufficient information, it is fine for supervisors to make recommendations based off of what they have currently observed. They may also want to include some thoughts concerning the criteria used in selecting you for your internship.

  1. I have more than one internship and together I reach the eligibility requirements. Can I still apply?

Yes, you may apply as long as both internships are non-paying. You should submit  an application (make sure you list both internships and the number of hours and weeks you spend at each) and 2 Supervisor Authorization forms (one from each supervisor).

  1. When are decisions made and checks mailed?

In general, decisions are made 1 month after the deadline, and checks are mailed approximately 10 business days after decisions are made. To view dates and deadlines for the current semester, visit the Wasserman Jobs and Internships page.

NYU Wasserman Center Internship Grant: Tips + Info from a Student Winner

Best part of winning the WCIG: The Wasserman Center Internship Grant allowed me to reduce financial stress in regards to bills and continuous rent payments. Without this internship grant, I would have otherwise sought monetary support from relatives`, whom have adversities and hardships of their own.

 Most challenging or rewarding part of your internship: The most rewarding part of my internship was the fact that it provided a public service to a generally underserved population. Not just underserved, but underrepresented. NDWA strives to provide resources to domestic workers and in-home care providers. These workers tend to be older and at times immigrants to the U.S. Jobs such as these are usually most readily available for them upon their arrival, yet NDWA realizes that while this may be the case, the majority of these employers are potentially violating basic human and labor rights. The rewarding part of working with NDWA has been the capacity to be able to have interacted with this population that only strives to obtain the simplest of information in seeking to improve their lives.

 Good advice for others applying for the WCIG: Take on an internship that you potentially see yourself in, or have always had a desire to pursue. By doing this, you can learn whether you are “in it till the end” or if it is not ultimately the right fit. Despite determining this, always strive to leave a good impression of yourself, even if it is not your passion. You are there to assist the colleagues you have learned to work with. These colleagues and the relationships built can assist you in networking, and potentially help and guide you in reaching your own goals.

 Non-paying internship survival 101 tip: Try not to think about the non-payment portion. While this can be hard, focusing in on it and having had received this grant, I have learned it makes the experience counter-productive. Through my undergraduate and graduate career, I’ve always accepted the notion that this is for now, and I am working towards having a paying job in the future. A positive attitude is key to appreciating what you are learning, and being able to successfully apply it in your future job.

Are you interning this semester? Whether or not you are getting paid, take Rosa’s advice on using your internship as an opportunity to learn more about your career interests. If your internship is non-paying, and at a not-for-profit organization or within an industry that does not typically pay interns (arts, entertainment, media, education), apply now for the Wasserman Center Internship Grant. Apply by February 24th at 11:59pm: NYU CareerNet Job ID #953347 or contact wassermaninternshipgrant@nyu.edu with questions.

Rosa Valdes is a second year graduate student at the Wagner School of Public Service, pursuing a degree in Public Administration. This past fall, Rosa interned at the National Domestic Workers Alliance. Outside of her internship, Rosa continues her schoolwork and provides freelance volunteer hours to the Bilingual Foundation of the Arts in Los Angeles, CA. The Bilingual Foundation of the Arts requires continuous assistance in their development in an ever-changing sector, in which innovations are sought to exhibit interest in the arts.

Myths vs. Facts! The Truth About Landing a Job in Arts & Entertainment

Myths vs. Facts! Breaking down the common misconceptions, urban legends and false facts around landing a job in Arts & Entertainment.

Myth: All you need is talent.

Fact: Talent is only part of what gets you hired. As with any job, you also need to have a resume and other application materials that clearly convey your qualifications. It’s also important to be industry savvy.  The more you understand your industry and the more you network within it, the more effectively you’ll be able to position yourself to be hired!

 

Myth: If you want to work in the entertainment industry, you have to be an actor, writer, or director.

Fact: The entertainment industry has a wide range of employment opportunities beyond those jobs! Think about all the names that you see in the end credits of a movie or tv show, or in a playbill. There are a plethora of freelance and staff positions behind the scenes and throughout every aspect of the industry. You can learn about these by reading trade publications, conducting informational interviews, participating in industry networking events, and attending Wasserman panels such as  “What’s Next: Humanities.”

 

Myth: I’m a performer so I don’t need to do an internship. 

Fact: Internships can be a great way for you to get the inside scoop on what the industry wants. For instance, by interning with a casting office, you’ll see how hiring decisions are made, which can help you be smarter about how you present yourself at an audition.

 

Myth: All actors are waiters.

Fact: While the food service industry does offer a flexible schedule that gives actors the ability to also audition, there are a variety of “sustainable” jobs that an actor can have. This includes teaching artist, web designer, tour guide, concierge, IT support, graphic designer, personal organizer, real estate agent, and fitness trainer, just to name a few. A career counselor can help you identify your marketable skills and determine which sustainable jobs might be right for you.

 

Myth: If I don’t have an agent within six months after graduation, I’ll never get work.

Fact: Most early-career artists don’t have agents! In fact, it’s rare for students to obtain agents immediately after graduation. Agents prefer to see that artists have some experience outside of school – if the artist is able to obtain work on their own or is getting notice from competitions (e.g. the Nicholl Fellowship) or festivals (e.g. SXSW), that signals to the agent that the artist has enough talent to be marketable.

 

 

Student Perspective: How to Stay Productive During Thanksgiving Break

By: Claudia Enriquez

Claudia Enriquez is a second year student receiving her Masters in Public Administration from NYU Wagner. She currently works as a Graduate Program Assistant at NYU Wasserman. She is a New Yorker at heart, growing up in Long Island, then moving to upstate New York to attend college, and now she’s back downstate and enjoying her time at NYU.

Before (or after) your food coma from all of the Thanksgiving goodies, take advantage of your Thanksgiving break to start your internship search! These helpful tips will give you a head start with your internship preparation.

Research and secure your Spring or Summer 2015 internship

Don’t be disheartened if you haven’t secured a spring internship yet – there is still time! Companies are still looking for interns to fill spots so do your research and search for companies that are hiring.  Check out CareerNet and other job search engines such as idealist.org and indeed.com.

Prepare for your Summer 2015 internship by researching various options. Block off time to sit down and reflect on the type of internship opportunities you’re most interested in. Do your homework, but don’t send out applications just yet. Most employers are off during the holiday and you don’t want your application getting overlooked.

Organize Your Job Search

Keep track of the companies you research and where you send off applications. It’s important to keep yourself organized to stay on top of your job search process. Create either an excel or word document template with the information below. This will really help you when you start sending out batches of applications after break.

  • Company Name – The name of the organization
  • Contact – The point of contact at the company
  • Email/Phone Number – Point of contact information
  • Application Deadline – Last day to submit your application
  • Date Applied – When you submitted your application
  • Position Title – What position you applied/are applying for
  • Application Summary – What you submitted with your application (resume, cover letter, etc.)
  • Interview – When your interview is scheduled
  • Follow-up – Whether or not you sent a thank you email or letter after the interview
  • Status – If you were rejected, offered the job, pending, etc.

Update your resume

If you haven’t updated your resume since the start of the Fall semester or prior, take advantage of your free time now to do so! Don’t wait until you find your dream job or internship to update your resume. Keep your resume up-to-date so you’re not editing at the very last minute and continue to add your experiences along the way.

Make sure your resume stands out! Have peers look over your resume and visit a Career Coach at Wasserman when you come back from break. If you’re a graduating senior, take advantage of the Resume Book Collection!

Enjoy Thanksgiving break

Lastly, enjoy your break! Spend time with family and friends, and have a great Thanksgiving!

 

 

 

 

Sources: http://jobsearch.about.com/od/findajob/ss/How-To-Organize-Your-Job-Search_2.htm#step-heading