Category Archives: Internships

4 Golden Rules to Rocking Your Virtual Internship

By Janel Abrahami

Janel Abrahami is a May 2014 graduate of NYU Steinhardt’s Applied Psychology program. She currently serves the NBCUniversal intern population as a Campus 2 Career Assistant and a catalyst for early career development.You can find her talking about all things work on Twitter and LinkedIn

Looking for a flexible way to explore a new industry or pursue a passion while at school? Consider a virtual internship! Check out the NYU CareerNet job board for current openings.

From campus ambassador gigs, to web development co-ops, to editorial spots, virtual internships are as limitless as ever before. These unique positions allow young professionals to gain valuable experience in chosen fields while still maintaining some flexibility in their crazy schedules. They can even be great ways to extend summer internships into the fall semester by doing work remotely from campus!

However, with this flexibility may also come a lack of structure that could derail your progress working away from the office. Heed these golden rules to get the most out of your virtual internship- just add WiFi:

  1. Set clear goals from the beginning: The best way to determine how much progress you’ve made is to measure against a fixed goal. Have a conversation with your supervisor at the start of your internship about what she would like you to accomplish, as well as the company’s goals in general. Keep these handy to reference when working and be ready to…

  2. Schedule regular check-ins with your supervisor: Plan 30-minute calls or skype sessions every month or after each project to get feedback on what what’s working and what can be improved upon going forward. This is a great time to get valuable feedback from your boss, but it’s also a chance for you to be honest about your experience so far and make sure that you are getting the guidance and mentorship you need as well.

  3. Keep track of your deadlines: When school and extracurriculars are also competing for your commitment, it can be easy to lose track of an internship assignment- especially when your boss is not personally there to make sure you get it done. Keep a shared work calendar on Google Drive with your team; break assignments into smaller tasks; set reminders on your phone- however you stay organized and keep your deadlines in mind.

  4. Stay inspired!: A virtual internship should be an organic way to pursue your passion wherever you are. Keep up-to-date on news in your field, subscribe to trade journals, and network with other virtual interns to share ideas and find inspiration when you feel disengaged.

Have you held a virtual internship before? What advice would you add to this list?

Five Things You Need to Do Before You Apply for that Spring Internship

By: Janel Abrahami

Janel AbrahamiJanel Abrahami is a May 2014 graduate of NYU Steinhardt’s Applied Psychology program. She currently serves the NBCUniversal intern population as a Campus 2 Career Assistant and a catalyst for early career development.You can find her talking about all things work on Twitter and LinkedIn

So you found the perfect spring internship and you’re ready to apply! Or are you? Read on to make sure you’ve done these five things before you hit “Submit.”

Know your stuff

A hiring manager can tell immediately if an applicant is familiar with their company or not- and this can make or break their hiring decision. Do your extensive research on the company’s background, its clients, its leaders, its revenue sources- everything that makes a company tick. Not only will you be making a more informed decision about applying to this company (are you actually that passionate about their mission statement?), you will also be able to more effectively express the value you could add to the company in your cover letter or an interview.

Optimize your resume

If you are applying for a position at a large company, chances are high that they use an Applicant Tracking System to accumulate the hundreds of resumes that they receive. These are often referred to as “black holes,” and for good reason- it can be very easy for your resume to fall through the cracks and never see the light of day (or a recruiter’s eyes). But there is hope, and it comes in the form of keyword searches. Recruiters can search through pages of resumes to find those with certain keywords (e.g. “javascript” or “affiliate marketing”). Optimize your resume by including a few keywords from the online job description that are relevant to your experience.

Polish and shine

Once the content of your resume is ATS-friendly, make sure the format is recruiter-friendly. This means one-page of relevant experience, clearly defined sections for education and skills, and appropriate contact information (no email addresses from middle school or embarrassing voice mail recordings!).

Connect the dots

I don’t need to tell you that #networking is one of the best ways to get your foot in the door, but it is something that internship applicants often fumble with. First, use LinkedIn to see if you know anyone connected to the company you’re applying to. Once you’ve found them, either message them through LinkedIn or email them personally (whichever you think would be more appropriate). Briefly tell them that you are applying for X position at Y company, and ask them if they could recommend someone for you to send your resume to. Do not ask them to forward your resume themselves- if they are willing to do this, they will offer in their reply. Once you have a contact at the company, you’re ready to…

Make it personal

….reach out to them with a brief but personalized message expressing your interest in the position. Attach your resume and cover letter, and mention your referee’s name in the first line of your email. Then, relax with the assurance that you’ve already out yourself ahead of other applicants.

Do you have your own application checklist? Is there something else you’d include here? Share with us in the comments.

About On-Campus Recruitment  

On-Campus Recruitment (OCR) is one of the many ways for NYU juniors, seniors, and graduate students to discover job and internship opportunities. Through OCR, employers come to the Wasserman Center to interview students. 

To obtain access to OCR, you must attend both a mandatory OCR Orientation and an Acing the Interview seminar (find upcoming dates and times on NYU CareerNet).

Important Spring Deadlines for On-Campus Recruitment (OCR):
  • The first resume drops for Spring OCR positions begin November 17th
  • First deadline to apply is December 2nd
  • Interviews begin January 20th(the week before classes begin)
Learn more about On-Campus Recruitment by clicking here!

Hatstand Green Beret Program

Hatstand is a global financial technology consultancy with a specialist focus on electronic trading systems, connectivity, data management, risk, compliance and regulation. With offices in major trading centers in Europe, the Americas and Asia, we have launched the careers of hundreds of technology professionals, many of whom now hold senior level positions in leading financial institutions. 

Our Green Beret program focuses on talent development for technology professionals within financial services.  We select individuals with the right attitude, energy and enthusiasm, plus relevant technical experience, and combine this with bespoke training and mentoring.  Our junior consultants typically spend two years with one of our clients.

Gaurav is a Java Developer who recently completed his first year with the Hatstand Green Beret (HGB) program.  He is working with the Consolidated Alerts and Monitoring (CAM) team with one of our global investment banking clients.  Gaurav has shared a brief overview of his role, its challenges and his successes:

CAM is a global system requiring geographical distribution of resources.  It was conceived as part of Cash Equities in Investment Banking but its systems are responsible for trade monitoring activities for the entire investment banking group.  CAM systems receive client order flows from multiple systems and performs real time trade risk checks, monitoring and surveillance.  The main responsibilities in this role are application enhancement and development, testing and QA analysis.  There is no dedicated QA/testing team so it becomes the developer’s responsibility to ensure high quality of the software solution.  Developers also engage the business in requirements and testing and are sometimes required to provide L3 support. 

The team is distributed across US, Europe and APAC regions.  It is a growing team with many new people and senior developers with specific expertise in the design and implementation of high performance framework.  The team is faced with the complex and aging portfolio of software solutions.  As the number of applications has grown it has eroded the performance and stability of the system, so there is a need to review and refactor the existing system to improve performance.  Most of the development work is around application enhancements.  After every change in the application thorough regression testing needs to be performed, which is a time consuming and manual process.  I have built tools to automate certain parts of this process, which has improved overall productivity and turnaround time for regression testing.  

Before joining Hatstand I worked for two years in the software industry as a Java developer.  Through this role in the HGB program I have gained experience developing low latency high throughput financial applications, and knowledge of electronic trading in cash equity markets.  My technical skillset includes Java, databases, shell scripting and FIX protocol.  In the future I would like to continue to gain technical expertise in developing high throughput and low latency applications in the financial sector.

Want to learn more? Meet with Hatstand for a one-on-one informational interview through our Recruiter-in-Residence program on Tuesday 10/28 by RSVPing through NYU CareerNet > Events > Seminars today!

Preparing for OCR Interviews EMPLOYER INSIGHTS Video Series

On-Campus Recruitment (OCR) is one of the many ways for NYU juniors, seniors, and graduate students to discover job and internship opportunities. Through OCR, employers come to the  Wasserman Center to interview students. In addition to participating in OCR, we recommend that you also attend our seminars, apply for positions via NYU CareerNet, attend career fairs, and meet with a career coach to help identify opportunities that are right for you.

This video will give you some insight on how to prepare for OCR interviews!

Want to learn more about On Campus Recruitment? Attend an upcoming OCR Orientation.

To see the full list, search OCR under the “Events” tab on NYU CareerNet

Alumni Spotlight: Ke Jin

There are a wide variety of careers in hospitality. Through a career in hospitality you can focus on special events, finance, public relations, and more. NYU Tisch Center alumnus Ke Jin earned his Master’s Degree in Hospitality Industry Studies in May 2014 with a concentration in Hotel Finance. He shares a bit about his academic and professional experience on the What’s New Tisch Center blogRead the entire article here

 

ARE YOU ALSO A HOSPITALITY MAJOR? ATTEND THE 2014 FALL HOSPITALITY, TOURISM, AND SPORTS MANAGEMENT CAREER FAIR ON THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30TH. RSVP TODAY!

Profile of a Wasserman Center Internship Grant Recipient

Aidai Tursunbekova is a Wagner School of Public Services student interning in the United Nations Office of High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States (UN-OHRLLS). As a past recipient of the Wasserman Center Internship Grant, she shares some insight into the value of applying for the Grant, and offers some tips to further your candidacy.

Best part of winning the WCIG: The Wasserman Center Internship Grant helped me to be more focused on my internship and feel less stressed about paying my bills.

Most challenging or rewarding part of your internship: UN-OHRLLS works to promote the interests of lesser developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing states. I was on the team for landlocked developing countries, and our goal was to promote trade facilitation and infrastructure development for these countries. My main area of interest is economic development, and this internship in the UN-OHRLLS gave me an opportunity to work in that field, because trade is crucial for economic development. 

Good advice for others applying for the WCIG: I would suggest that they show their interest and passion about what they do. Additionally, they should try to build good relationships with all colleagues. It is important not only for a good internship experience, but also for networking. 

Non-paying internship survival 101 tip: Think of your internship not as a work, but  as a good opportunity to learn more about your area of interest and what you want to do after graduation. Maybe you will find what you want to do for the rest of your life, or understand that it’s simply not for you. In any case, it’s an important experience!

Are you interning this semester? Whether or not you are getting paid, take Aidai’s advice on using your internship as an opportunity to learn more about your career interests. If your internship is non-paying, and at a not-for-profit organization or within an industry that does not typically pay interns (arts, entertainment, media, education), apply now for the Wasserman Center Internship Grant. Apply by Sep 30th at 11:59pm: NYU CareerNet Job ID #927342.

Employer Insights: How the Engineering & Technology Fair Worked For Me

by Anthony Giorgio

Way back at the turn of the millennium, I was studying Computer Science at Polytechnic University, on the former Long Island campus.  During my freshman year, I learned about the annual on-campus career fair that was held in the spring.  I had visited the career services office, and they were offering students the chance to volunteer at the fair to help setup the various tables and booths.  I decided to take them up on their offer, and arrived at the fair early in the morning.  I carried boxes of tchotchkes and  marketing materials from the recruiters’ cars into the gym, and struck up a few conversations.  Eventually the fair started, and the horde of students arrived.  Being a lowly freshman, I didn’t have much to offer, and was politely rejected from every table.  I didn’t expect anything different, and resigned myself to a fate of again spending summer break working for McDonald’s.  

As the fair wound down, I helped the various recruiters pack up their booths, and they gladly rewarded me with a plentiful supply of keychains, pens, stress balls, and other items emblazoned with corporate logos.  There was one company, however, that I spent more than a few minutes chatting with.  They were a local Hewlett-Packard reseller, who also employed software engineers for consulting work.  The recruiter seemed to like me, and said they would be in touch.

A week or so later, they called me up and offered me a summer internship.  I was elated, since I didn’t expect to be doing technical work as a freshman.  I ended up working there for the entire summer, performing a variety of intern-related IT roles.  As my role was winding down, and I was preparing to return to school, the company hired another intern to replace me.  He was another student at Poly, but he was a senior and preparing to graduate.  In the few weeks we worked together, we became acquaintances, and learned to respect each other’s abilities.  I sometimes spoke to him during the school year, but since he was older than I, our social circles didn’t cross very much.

The next summer I again attended the career fair, and this time I managed to land an internship at Symbol Technologies (now part of Motorola).  I was fortunate enough that my resume had the right key technical terms, and the recruiter gave me a callback.  I spent the next two years working there, as my class schedule permitted.  It gave me excellent insights into how the corporate world worked, and invaluable experience in software development.

As I entered my senior year, I began to look for full-time employment, since I needed a “real” job.  I decided to attend the fall career fair at the Brooklyn campus, since I felt that waiting for the spring one on Long Island might be too late.  I put on my interview suit, printed out a stack of resumes, and climbed on the coach bus the school chartered for the occasion.  I felt confident, since I had three years of work experience, and I was about to complete a combination BS-MS program in Computer Science.   Still, I was nervous – what if nobody hires me?  What if I can’t get an offer?  I put those thoughts to rest as the bus parked in downtown Brooklyn.  

When I entered the career fair, I was surprised at how crowded it was.  The Long Island fairs usually had a decent turnout, but the Brooklyn one was on an entirely different level.  The popular companies had lines 20 students     deep, and there were so many tables they spilled over into the lobby of the library.  As I made my way around the fair, I met with the recruiters, shook their hands, passed out resumes, and recited my spiel innumerable times.  Eventually I made my way to the IBM table.  As luck would have it, my former classmate and colleague from my first internship had returned to recruit!  After the perfunctory greeting, he introduced me to the hiring manager, and we chatted briefly.  He seemed to like me, and told me to head to the career services office after the fair.  I wasn’t quite sure what would happen next, but I eagerly agreed.

After a nervous lunch, I headed over to the career services office, where I saw a number of other students.  Some I recognized from my campus, while others I had never seen before.  The woman in charge of the office said that the representatives from IBM would be individually interviewing us, since we had passed their pre-screening.  When it was my turn, I met with the recruiter once more, and talked for about a half-hour in a private office.  He asked me about my academic career, my work experience, and a number of other things to feel me out as a candidate.  The interview drew to a close, and he congratulated me, shaking my hand.  He promised that the hiring manager would be in touch, and to prepare for a phone interview.  I was pleased, but somewhat unsure.  I had never interviewed on a phone before, and didn’t really know what to expect.  

A few weeks later, I received an email from the hiring manager, asking when it would be convenient for me to talk.  We set up a date and time, and proceeded to have a pleasant conversation with each other.  This interview was rather similar to my previous one with IBM, where the interviewer seemed more interested about my personality and how I would fit in, rather than my technical skills.  At the end of the call, the manager said that he was going to recommend I come up for an in-person interview, and that someone from Human Resources would be in touch.  Within a few days, I received another email, this time inviting me to the IBM facility in Poughkeepsie, NY.  The HR representative gave me all the details, including directions to the site, what hotel I would be staying at, how to be reimbursed for my travel expenses, and what restaurants I should eat at.

As my in-person interview date approached, I realized that this would be the longest drive I have ever taken, and I would be doing it solo.  It was also before GPS or smartphones were common, so I made sure to print the route out using Mapquest directions, and brought along a paper map backup.  I packed an overnight bag, climbed into my old Honda, and headed north.  After two hours, I arrived in Poughkeepsie, and managed to find my hotel.  I checked in, grabbed a bite to eat, and prepared my suit for the interview tomorrow.  

The next morning, I headed over to the IBM facility on Route 9.  Once inside, I joined a large number of other candidates preparing to take the IPAT exam (a standardized test given to job applicants).  I spent about 90 minutes taking the test, and then we were all instructed to wait for our hiring managers to pick us up from the lobby.  A short while later, my manager came by, and I recognized him as being the same one from the career fair.  He explained that his job was to take me around the site and bring me to various groups that had job openings.  We drove around to a number of different offices, and I met a few different hiring managers.  Each one had a specific opening, for either software development or test.  The management team also took me out to lunch, which I later found out was so they could see how I handled social situations.  At the end of the day, the recruiting manager asked which of the positions I’d like to work in.  I ended up picking the sole development one, since it seemed the most interesting.  

I drove home the next day, retracing the hundred-mile journey downstate.  I thought I did well, but I wasn’t sure if I would get a written job offer.  After the weekend, I returned to school, and resumed my classes.  As the weeks went by, I became more nervous about my chances.  I had another written job offer, but it had an expiration date attached.  I was hoping that I would simultaneously have two job offers in hand so I could pick the more appealing one.  Finally, in mid-February, a letter arrived from IBM with my official offer.  I decided to accept, and began communicating with a Human Resources representative on all the things required to start my employment.

In conclusion, pursuing a job opportunity with a large corporation can be a long journey.  Decisions take time, and multiple people are involved in many steps.  From the candidate’s perspective, the interminable wait can be nerve-wracking, but it’s all part of the process.  It’s also important to differentiate yourself from the rest of the candidates.  If you tell the recruiter what makes you a good hire, it will help them to recall you later on.  Remember, having the smarts to do the job only gets you so far, but effective communication, teamwork, and a positive attitude will get you to the prize!

If you’d like to work for IBM, we’re hiring!  We have a number of openings available in the Systems & Technology Group.  These are for both co-ops and entry-level positions.  If you’re interested, check out the following links:

System z Software Developer – Intern (Poughkeepsie, NY or Tuscon, AZ)

System z Software Developer – Entry Level (Poughkeepsie, NY; Tuscon, AZ; or San Jose, CA)

IBM Wave Software Developer – Entry Level (Poughkeepsie, NY)

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO MEET WITH IBM, STOP BY THEIR BOOTH AT THE ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY CAREER FAIR. RSVP THROUGH NYU CAREERNET BY CLICKING HERE!

Profile of a Wasserman Center Internship Grant Recipient

Julie Yoon is a Steinhardt student working as a Multimedia Intern at the Clinton Foundation. As a past recipient of the Wasserman Center Internship Grant, she shares some insight into the value of applying for the Grant, and offers some tips to further your candidacy.

Best part of winning the WCIG: Because my internship was full-time, I knew that it would be difficult to secure a paying job. As we all know, living in NYC is very expensive and the Wasserman Center Internship Grant eased my overall stress and allowed me to focus on my internship.

Most challenging or rewarding part of your internship: Interning at the Clinton Foundation allowed me to continue my commitment to mission-driven media making. One of the most rewarding parts of my internship was working with people who are driven by the same mission that I firmly believe in. It motivated and inspired me everyday while I practiced my editing and visual storytelling skills.

Good advice for others applying for the WCIG: To those who are applying for the Wasserman Center Internship Grant, I would advise to form candid relationships with their mentors or supervisors. Let them know that you are passionate about your internship and that you are there to learn. This will not only show in your application but also in the supervisor’s recommendation.

Non-paying internship survival 101 tip: Live in the moment. Yes, you won’t get paid, but you will learn a lot and discover something new about yourself. Make your experience invaluable!

Are you interning this semester? Whether or not you are getting paid, take Julie’s advice on forming relationships with mentors and supervisors. If your internship is non-paying, and at a not-for-profit organization or within an industry that does not typically pay interns (arts, entertainment, media, education), apply now for the Wasserman Center Internship Grant. Apply here by Sep 30th at 11:59pm: NYU CareerNet Job ID #927342.

Student Perspective: ICAP’s Summer Internship Program

I initially applied to ICAP’s summer internship program after hearing about the company from a close friend, as well as people in related industries.

My main interest was to secure a client-facing role within a financial services organization after graduation. I wanted to work for an organization that was both innovative and imparted responsibility upon young employees; both of which I had been informed was possible at ICAP. After rotating on several desks in both Global Broking and Electronic Markets during my summer internship, I was offered and accepted a role within EBS, which is an electronic foreign exchange platform. This was a Junior Account Executive role, with responsibility for an account, as well as dealing with all of the clients’ needs from a trading perspective. Typically this involves client visits to demonstrate new trading functionality on the platform, building relationships with everyone from the manual traders on the desk, to the e-commerce teams and the billing department. Essentially, anything that the client needs or has queries about, we take care of. This ensures that the role is diverse. Each day is different.

At the beginning of the graduate program we were on a 3 week training program which covered a multitude of different financial products. This training was vital in providing the breadth and depth of knowledge across asset classes; knowledge that is becoming increasingly important where electronic platforms are operating as multi-product services. Having access to the learning material via an online portal has also been a great help, particularly when wanting to brush up on products which are emerging into my daily role and products that will be more prominent in the future. Continuous training has also been provided on softer skills, which has been very helpful in managing my personal brand.

I have been very fortunate to be given a significant amount of responsibility at a very early stage. Today, 12 months after joining the graduate scheme, I now have multiple accounts that I manage across many cities including Moscow and Amsterdam, to name a few. Being able to travel to those places is one of the aspects that I enjoy the most about my role. The variety of learning about new markets, the politics that is linked to them, and the culture of each city, is a great experience which really expands your knowledge and perspective in general. Many challenges also arise when this much responsibility is given. Firstly, managing to juggle all the tasks that need to be completed as well as maintaining relationships in multiple countries at the same time is pretty difficult; especially when you’re travelling with work to Moscow, and still dealing with queries back in London. However, this is what makes the role multi-faceted and ensures greater personal development.

ICAP is a pretty unique company. Within its umbrella there are many companies where each desk / product is exciting in different ways. Having this choice is great, as the graduate recruitment team helps to match up graduates with the personalities of each desk, to ensure a good fit. I’m glad I made the choice to join ICAP’s team; my experience has been better than I could have anticipated it would be.

To find out more about ICAP, the kind of people we’re looking for, and to apply, visit www.icapcampusrecruitment.com.

Student Perspectives: Interning in Council Member Margaret Chin’s office

by Jessica Chen

What made this summer the best summer? Was it my weeklong vacation in California or my weekend adventures outside of New York City? Nope; this summer was the best because of all the time I spent in my favorite city, New York. Interning in Council Member Margaret Chin’s office allowed me to explore Lower Manhattan and gained a unique experience that I would otherwise not have.

As an intern for Council Member Chin, I was able to travel between City Hall, 250 Broadway (the Legislative Office), and her District Office multiple times a day.  District One is the best; everything is within walking distance!

As an intern, I learned firsthand about the work the in City Hall as well as the district office. I really enjoyed going to City Council meetings; from listening in on conversations between the council members to hearing testimony from advocates and the general public, this internship really showed me how city government works.  One of my favorite things to do in City Hall was to be in the room during a stated meeting, which is when city bills are voted on.  Because I was in the room when a bill was passed, I felt like I was experiencing a piece of City history.

Most of my time was spent at the District Office, working under the guidance of the fulltime staff. I learned so much about the district and the city as a whole. Through working with constituents, I learned about the different problems people in the district faced, such as housing, immigration, and even education issues. Not only did I learn about these issues, I learned how to deal with them as well.

Working with constituents really helped me improve my communication skills. Watching the staff members ask questions about a case made me realize that I had to dig deeper in order to get all the facts. Sometimes when constituents would describe their case and I didn’t know how to respond, Xiaomin, Linda, Patricia and even our new staffers Vincent and Yong would fill in with an appropriate response. In moments like these I am reminded that as an intern, I have so much more to learn, and am grateful to have the opportunity to do so.

Working with constituents and on special intern projects, I’ve learned so much through firsthand experience. I know so much more about issues faced by the City’s residents as well as the policies and proposals used to address them. After working for Council Member Chin’s office this past summer I feel like more of a New Yorker than I’ve ever been.  I highly recommend interning at Council Member Chin’s office. It’s a great learning experience and has truly opened my eyes to the inner workings of city government.

Sound like a place you’d like to work? Apply for their openings on CareerNet: Job ID 942467