Category Archives: Mentor Spotlight

Mentor Network Spotlight: Kendra and Holley

Mentor Network Spotlight: Kendra

Company:
The Broadway League/The Tony Awards

Position:
Marketing Coordinator

College/University you attended:
NYU Gallatin

Major:
Individualized Major with a concentration in Theatre and Marketing

How did you find your job?
I had heard of the Broadway League through an internship I secured at Disney Theatrical Group. I googled the company and applied through their website. Eight months after I finished my semester-long internship with them and had graduated college, my former superviser e-mailed me saying they had an opening.

What’s the weirdest job you ever had?
I was interested in all aspects of marketing so I took a face-to-face marketing position as a promotional model for a liquor company. I gave out free samples of vodka and Bourbon in liquor stores far out in Brooklyn and Harlem. Most of my “customers” were not really interested in my marketing spiel on the brands of alcohol I was there to promote, but it was great interpersonal
experience.

What’s the best career advice you ever received?
Stay in touch! Many industries are smaller than you think and connections are immensely valuable. My social media habits and networking skills really came in handy when my current position became available and my former coworkers immediately thought of me for it.

What is the hardest interview question you’ve ever been asked? How did you answer it?
The hardest interview question for me has always been “Where do you see yourself in 5 or 10 years?”. I have never had an idealistic occupational future in mind, but was fortunate enough to experience the helpful organic process of developing a path to my future through Gallatin. Fulfilling aspects of one course, job, or experience lead me to seek out those aspects in other areas. I have always answered this question with a description of my work situation or ideal industry, rather than a specific position. I let my interviewer know I want to be promoting what I love (theatre) in the most efficient environment possible, working for people I respect and aspire to be like and learn from.

What part of your college experience prepared you most for the real world?
The advisement I received throughout my undergraduate career was great practice for planning next steps for the rest of my life – practicing skills of communicating my individual issues and solutions was beneficial to most interactions I have in the workplace today. Additionally and of course, my internships in college taught me where real life applications for what I had learned in my courses would happen and how I could apply my personality and skill set to them.

If you could tell your college self one thing, what would it be?
Don’t be afraid to ask for more help! Independence is a great quality to have, but the resource of a large and talented faculty ready and willing to help you on anything is incredibly valuable.

http://pinterest.com/pin/61994932342035722/

Mentor Network Spotlight: Holley

 


Company:
Thomson Reuters

Position:
Marketing Associate

College/University you attended:
College of Arts and Sciences

Major:
Double major in Economics & Social and Cultural Analysis

How did you find your job?
Thomson Reuters’ career portal. A friend had just gotten a job there (in a different division) and recommended that I apply. I applied not really thinking it would go anywhere, but here I am!

What’s the weirdest job you ever had?
For two weekends during my freshman year, I worked at a custom print T shirt stand in the flea market on Broadway and West 4th. Working a hot press
did not really play well to my skill set so I babysat instead.

What’s the best career advice you ever received?
Create your own job. I used to think that this just meant to be an entrepreneur, but what I am beginning to realize is that you can create your own job while working for someone else. All you have to do is play to your strengths and
create your own niche within your firm. In my office, I have effectively taken over our marketing automation software; not because I was assigned it, but because I enjoy working with the software and spent time learning more about it and helping others in the office. Showing others what you are good at and helping those who need extra help will open up opportunities for you to expand and effectively create your own role in the organization.

What is the hardest interview question you’ve ever been asked? How did you answer it?
The question that always gets me is “tell me about yourself.” I always have trouble with this; how can I explain myself in three minutes or less. I always try to tailor the answer for the job that I am looking for. If I’m interviewing for a marketing position, I’m going to talk about my communication skills, event production and promotion skills, a few of my professional triumphs, and my passion for social media. If I was applying for a project manager job, I could still talk about these things but give them a different spin; perhaps I discuss the events I have produced from a logistics point of view rather than the communications aspects I would emphasize in the marketing role. You have to look at yourself through the lens of the position – how do you fit the criteria the company is looking for?

What part of your college experience prepared you most for the real world?
NYU’s emphasis on internships and deep commitment to being part of the larger New York community were two things that helped me get ready for “real” life. NYU has amazing connections with firms that very few schools have and you should take advantage of them! Furthermore, New York is unique in that it is not dominated by one industry; arts, finance, publishing, journalism, film, tech, etc. are all able to call NYC home. This malleability gives students the opportunity
to pursue their interests through many industries to find what fits. Where else can you transition industries with such ease?

If you could tell your college self one thing, what would it be?
Enjoy the journey; your college experience lasts generally only four years (and it goes by so quickly). You have your entire life to work, so don’t forget to stop and enjoy where you are now. Study abroad, spend time with friends, learn, and figure out who you are and what you care about. You’ll always have time to think and readjust, but you will not have the opportunity to do it like you can in college.

http://pinterest.com/pin/61994932342035839/

Mentor Network Spotlight: Feride Yalav

The Mentor Network is an online platform via NYU CareerNet that connects you with industry professionals and alumni who want to provide guidance and advice to NYU students. Featured in this post is one of our many talented and successful mentors!

Mentor:  Feride Yalav
Company: The Guide Istanbul (magazine and website)
Position: Writer and Editor
College/University you attended: Steinhardt
Major: TESOL

  • How did you find your job? Found and applied to it online
  • What’s the weirdest job you ever had? I worked at a hotel for four months
  • What’s the best career advice you ever received? You have to love what you do, otherwise quit and keep looking
  • What is the hardest interview question you’ve ever been asked? How did you answer it? What are you political views regarding Turkey and the Middle East? (I ended up not working for this place)
  • What part of your college experience prepared you most for the real world? Working with other people, time and deadline management, and learning to survive on my own
  • If you could tell your college self one thing, what would it be? Go after what makes you happy and don’t stray

Interested in joining the Mentor Network? NYU students can get more details by talking to a career counselor during a counseling appointment or walk-ins!

Interested in becoming a mentor? Visit www.nyu.edu/careerdevelopment, and go to Become a Mentor within within the Employers tab or the Alumni Tab; Create an NYU CareerNet account by clicking “Register for the first time”.