Category Archives: Networking101

Myths vs. Facts: The Truth About Landing a Job in Media

 

Myth #1: Careers in media often involve partying and meeting celebrities.

Fact: While working in media may give you exposure to exciting opportunities to meet a variety of people in the entertainment industry, when working for a media company, you are expected to remain professional at all times. Additionally, extensive hard work goes into events, and festivals including plenty of strategy meetings to ensure everything goes according to plan. Make sure to set your expectations accordingly!

Myth #2: You have to spend a long time in unpaid internships or in assistant roles.

Fact: These days, forward thinking companies recognize the value of young talent with fresh perspectives. Basic administrative tasks are part of any role, particularly those at entry level. However, it is worth doing research through sites like Glassdoor.com and using your network to learn about these innovative companies that are willing to include interns and entry-level employees in career development activities. Voice your interest in participating in creative initiatives and be ready to jump at any opportunity to partake in strategic meetings.

Myth #3: The only way to a media position is through connections.

Fact: It is true that networking is extremely important in searching for positions in the media industry, and it is common for students to find positions through alumni, professors, friends, and previous colleagues. However in the media industry, creativity and innovation trickle down through the structure all the way to the hiring process. Although connections may serve you well, creative and innovative companies such as the ones that exist in the media industry use social media to find new and interesting talent. Curate your social networking platforms such as Instagram, Twitter, Tumblr and Linkedin to help build your online presence.  Additionally, build your brand by developing an online resume to advertise your skills with links to your various online portfolios to provide readily accessible work samples. Social media is becoming more and more popular in the media industry to discover new talent, so ensure you are maintaining your networks accordingly!

Myth #4: Careers in Media are just about TV and Film.

Fact: There are a number of valuable career opportunities in media in additional areas such as print, journalism, magazines and publishing. Although you may not be as familiar with these industries, go outside your comfort zone and expand your job search to encompass these companies. Maximize your potential by exploring companies outside of those you might typically consider as ‘in your field’.

 Learn more about the hospitality industry by attending this Wasserman Center event:

All About Books: Panel on Writing, Publishing and Multimedia – Monday, April 20, 2015, 6pm-8pm, 20 Cooper Square, 7th Floor. 

Three Steps to Getting an Internship in Non-profit / Government

Deniz Duru Aydin is a senior at CAS, majoring in Politics and European & Mediterranean Studies. Originally from Istanbul, Turkey, she interned at various arts-related nonprofits and government organizations including the Lincoln Center and New York State Council on the Arts. She is currently working as a Policy Fellow with Access (www.accessnow.org), an international non-profit organization that focuses on issues at the intersection of technology and human rights. She is also involved in various projects on internet-related policymaking such as the Youth Coalition on Internet Governance and Freedom Online Coalition.

Three Steps to Getting an Internship in Non-profit / Government

by Deniz Duru Aydin (Peer in Career)

Whether you are a politics major who is dedicated to becoming the next President of the United States, or an environmentalist looking to gain experience while working for the advancement of a cause you are passionate about, an internship experience at a nonprofit or governmental organization is a great for your pre-professional development. Here are a few steps – all tested and verified – that will help you if your career search in the non-private sector:

1- Use NYU CareerNet with the right keywords and timing

You should know the best tags to filter from the hundreds of opportunities listed on NYU CareerNet. If you are interested in the non-profit sector and/or government organizations, using specific keywords including, but not limited to, “policy” “human rights” and “advocacy” will make your life easier.

Are you passionate about a specific cause? As the NYU CareerNet job search looks through job descriptions by default, you should also try searching for positions using specific policy issues. As an example, using “climate change” as a keyword will let you find internships posted by organizations working on environmental issues, including specialized governmental agencies. Alternatively, try to run your search using a geographical focus – ie. “Middle East” or “Latin America” – which will help you navigate the best opportunities that fit your academic experience or personal background. If you are an international student, remember to leverage your language skills by looking for opportunities in international organizations that require or prefer foreign language fluency.

Is there an election coming up? Use NYU CareerNet to look for opportunities to volunteer at an election campaign. Timing is definitely important when it comes to finding an interesting experience. As an example, I volunteered during the 2013 New York City mayoral elections to get a chance to observe first-hand how electoral politics work in the United States. Keep an open eye to what is happening around you and unleash your curiosity!

2- Take your job search to external platforms

Apart from NYU CareerNet, keep an eye on the websites of the organizations you are passionate about. Most nonprofits have year-round volunteering opportunities, as well as paid internship/assistantship options that they publish on their websites, mostly under “Careers” sections.

Another great resource for finding the right opportunity is Twitter! Most organizations publish their job advertisements on Twitter, as they think that it is an effective way to reach people who are most passionate about their work. Create a Twitter list that includes organizations that you would like to work/intern for. This way, you will not only have a great resource to check new opportunities in 140 characters, but also a personally curated list that will help you follow the updates on causes you care about!

If you are looking for a more aggregated job search platform, Idealist.org is very useful for finding nonprofit internships and volunteer opportunities, as its mission is “to close the gap between intention and action by connecting people, organizations, ideas, and resources.” In addition, most job search platforms such as indeed.com and LinkedIn job search have opportunities in the non-profit and government sector. Finally, remember to use more specialized resources such as usajobs.gov to find federal and state-level opportunities.

3- Develop new interests, network & network some more!

In today’s world and while you are in New York City, the opportunities for networking are limitless for all sectors, including nonprofit and government. Attending lectures outside your school at NYU would be a great idea to meet with influential thought leaders in the policy area you are interested in, as well as developing new interests. Use the NYU Events listing and keep an eye on the events calendars of interesting university-wide NYU institutions including but not limited to Center for Human Rights and Global Justice, Institute for Public Knowledge or The Governance Lab.

Events outside NYU are also helpful in finding your dream job or internship at a nonprofit. As an example, Dylan James Welch, a senior at NYU studying International Relations, found his current job through attending a TEDx Conference in his hometown Boston. After hearing about the organization, he got involved in its NYU Chapter, which led to an internship opportunity at the organization’s main office in New York City.

If you’d like to put your networking skills to the test, attend this popular Wasserman event featuring a number of non-profit organizations:

Dining for Success (For Juniors, Seniors and Graduate Students)

Thursday, April 2, 5:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. LOCATION: TBA (check CareerNet for the latest information) IN-PERSON REGISTRATION AND REFUNDABLE CASH DEPOSIT REQUIRED! Registration is first-come, first-served! Mastering interviewing skills is hard enough, but what about when your interview is over a meal? Don’t let your dining etiquette stand in the way of getting the job! Join NYU Recruiters from ESPN, Teach for America, Ernst & Young, PwC, The Walt Disney Company and more to practice these skills over a three-course meal! More information about in-person registration HERE.

The Policy Case Competition at NYU

Tommy Wang is a sophomore studying Finance and Economics at Stern School of Business. He is also the co-director for the Policy Case Competition and the e-board member of Politics Society at NYU which organises the event. 

 The Policy Case Competition at NYU – Deadline is Tonight at 11:59pm!

 If you are in any way involved in the politics clubs at NYU, you’ve probably heard of the NYU Policy Case Competition. The Policy Case Competition launched last year when 12 teams competed in solving policy problems regarding domestic, foreign, or economic policy.

 This competition serves as a great way for students to foster their critical thinking and creative problem solving skills. It is also a great opportunity for students to network with policy makers from NYU DC, the New York Federal Reserve, and other political think tanks. Last year, the winning team got a free trip to NYU DC to have dinner with political insiders and discuss their proposed solutions. For those who wish to have a career in politics, this is a great chance for them to get their foot in the door.

 This year, we have opened up the competition to schools outside of NYU. Currently, we have teams coming from Columbia, Princeton, and Hunter. This year’s Policy Case Competition will be bigger and better; we’ve invited esteemed panelists from Harvard, BlackRock, the Eisenhower Institute, and many more! The Politics Society at NYU encourages students to sign up to participate, or just attend the event on April 4th.​

Policy Case Competition

REGISTER NOW DEADLINE TONIGHT: Monday, March 9th 11:59PM

Find real world solutions to domestic, international, or economic issues. Present your team’s policy proposal to experts from the Federal Reserve, Roosevelt Institute, Harvard University, BlackRock, and other distinguished institutions. Single entrants and team registrations are both accepted. Register here! Space is limited. More info about PCC.

Asking for Advice, Not a Job: How to Conduct Informational Interviews

Megan Yasenchak is a current graduate student at NYU School of Continuing and Professional Studies, pursuing a Masters in Global Affairs.  She attended the NYU Wasserman Center@SCPS career event, entitled, “Asking for Advice, Not a Job: How to Conduct Informational Interviews” which was presented by Rachel Frint, Associate Director, NYU Wasserman Center at SCPS.  In competitive job markets, informational interviews are a key resource to assist job seekers by expanding and cultivating their career networks.

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What is Informational Interviewing?

Informational interviewing is a form of networking with experts from your field or a related industry. It is a personal meeting, one-on-one, where you are leading the conversation with that person by asking them for advice, insight and guidance in developing your career path. In these meetings, you ask questions about their own career experiences and their organizations as well. This process allows you to make a positive impression on an expert outside of the confines of a traditional job interview.

Why is Informational Interviewing important?

Informational interviewing is asking for resources, not asking for a job. However, informational interviewing may connect you to job opportunities. Frequently, employers do not post all of their vacancies through public announcements. These un-posted vacancies are referred to as the “hidden job market,” which accounts for nearly 70% of job opportunities.

Through informational interviewing, a job seeker leaves an impression with that industry expert. You are investing your time in building a relationship with the expert that can lead to, potentially, other future industry contacts. This networking could result in job opportunities.

How To Identify Potential Contacts

Everyone is a potential contact. There are “strong” connections, such as family and friends and “weak” connections, like classmates, former co-workers or new acquaintances at events. Use your personal network, professional associations, social media and the Wasserman Center to expand your connections!

How To Initiate an Informational Interview

First, identify who you are (i.e. your brand), what do you want to communicate, what are your goals and how you can maintain this relationship.

When requesting an informational interview, be clear and direct in your request. Introduce yourself and explain any connection, why you would like to meet and how you would like to connect (e.g. telephone, in person, video chat).

How to Conduct the Informational Interview

Your informational interview is to gain insight from an industry expert. Be prepared for the meeting by thinking of topics of conversation, conducting research on that person and/or organization and think of questions. Informational interviewing is your chance to gain critical insight into your career field from experts!

After the Informational Interview

Your goal is to maintain this relationship and build connections, especially after the meeting. Remember to send a quick thank you note (within 24 hours). Maintain the relationship by sending your contact an update on your professional life (every 1-3 months).

 Maintaining so many current and future contacts may seem daunting; so divide your connections into a manageable list. Meet with new one person every week. Try to schedule one informational interview every month. Reconnect with one former contact every week.

To develop your own career strategies for building a network, schedule an appointment with a NYU Wasserman Center Career Coach through NYU CareerNet

Professional Networking Tips from Treatings

Hayden Williams is Co-Founder and CEO of Treatings. Treatings is a professional networking platform that facilitates one-on-one meetups over coffee. Prior to Treatings, Hayden spent four years as an investment banker at BofA Merrill Lynch. He graduated from Vanderbilt in 2008 with a degree in Economics and Corporate Strategy.

My first job out of college was in investment banking. While Vanderbilt’s Career Center was a great resource in securing the job, it was the individual relationships I’d built the summer after my junior year that were most helpful in deciding what I wanted to do.

I was living in New York doing an internship in Consulting. I realized that I didn’t want to work in Consulting after graduating, so I had to figure out an alternative career path. I started reaching out to all of the Vanderbilt alumni I could find who were working in roles I was interested in, asking people out for coffee so I could learn about their job.

The most helpful conversations I had were with junior people working at the level I would be starting in. I wasn’t looking for a job offer, just access to information about what certain roles were like and what types of people succeeded in them. I found it more difficult to find junior people than senior people. Young professionals aren’t prominently displayed on company websites and often don’t think to open themselves up on alumni networks. But, by the end of the summer I’d met enough people in investment banking that I decided the transferable financial skills I’d pick up as an Analyst would make for a good place to start my career.

Fast forward three years later and I was promoted to Associate. I had learned a lot and worked with great people, but realized that I didn’t want to remain in investment banking forever. I wasn’t passionate about the work and my skill set was getting narrower. I wanted to leave the finance industry and potentially work at a start-up, but I didn’t know how viable that would be given my lack of technical expertise.

My best friend (and now co-founder), Paul, was in a similar situation. We both wanted to leave our finance jobs, but didn’t want to blindly transition to a job that wouldn’t be a great fit. We wanted to talk to peers who had made career transitions we were interested in. I found that existing professional networking tools were helpful in documenting and leveraging my professional network, but not reaching outside of it. This was a problem because no one in my network worked at a start-up.

Paul and I decided there should be a professional networking equivalent to online dating sites, where people could go when they wanted to meet people outside their network. So, we quit our jobs to build Treatings, a local professional network where everyone is open to meeting over coffee to share ideas and opportunities.

The core value that Treatings offers is access to knowledge. We believe that people’s insights and career experiences have as much latent value as any physical good they own, so we’re always looking to reduce the friction of knowledge transfer.

We’re a peer-to-peer networking site. We don’t differentiate between “consumers” of knowledge and “producers” of it. Most people sign up for Treatings as a consumer, not imagining that people would be interested in their insights. People are often surprised and flattered to hear they can be a producer of knowledge when they are asked by fellow members to talk about their work. People have been using Treatings to find collaborators, meet people with shared interests and learn about new skills.

We have incorporated a filter into Treatings that makes it easy for NYU alumni and students to connect with each other. You can sign up for the platform and follow companies and skills you’re interested in. You’re then matched with other members based on shared interests and can propose coffee meetings with whomever you’d like.

We think networking should be a routine part of people’s lives, but it doesn’t have to be boring or formal. Treatings is all about taking conversations about your work out of the office. We hope you get the opportunity to meet fellow members of the NYU community over coffee (or the beverage of your choice!).

Sign up today! treatings.co

Networking On and Offline

Samantha Knoerzer, a Publishing graduate student in SCPS, offers insight into the recent Networking On and Offline event. She is currently a eBook production intern at Berghahn Books, an international, academic book publishing house that resides in Dumbo, Brooklyn and works as a social media coordinator for BiblioCrunch, a source for indie publishers which helps connect self-published authors and publishers with book publishing professionals to get new books and apps to the market.

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Networking is an important part of furthering your career while attending and after NYU.  Whether you are looking to begin your career, expand it, or even if you want to switch careers completely, panelist speakers highlighted that it is important to network and get to know people in your field in order to expand your opportunities. The panelists stressed that networking is not about calling everyone in search of a job. Rather it is about building relationships, staying in touch with your current network, sharing information, asking for assistance, and most importantly, being authentic.

The four most important tips from the panel were:

  1. The three main steps of networking:

    1. Setting a career vision: Understand why you should network. Networking is important, as everyone already knows. It is important to understand two things when networking: What is my career vision? And, what do I want my next steps to be? By understanding these two things, you can begin to map out a potential career path via networking.

    2. Analyze yourself: Understand what you should network. Many people get stuck at this section, knowing that they want to network, but not knowing how to do so. In order to begin this path to networking, you need to ask yourself: What knowledge/skills/info do I have now? And, what knowledge/skills/info do I NEED in order to begin my networking path? Once you understand this, you can begin to network for your career.

    3. Set networking goals: Create networking goals to complete your career goals. Some sample networking goals are: What is the next step I should take in my career? How can I make a career change into publishing? What qualities is a specific company looking for? What are the trends that are happening in my field? Why am I not getting hired? In order to answer some of these questions, start by making a networking inventory of all the people you already know.

  2. Finding networking contacts online: How do you find contacts to strangers in your field online? The answer: Always look for online networking opportunities. Plenty of places hold networking events advertised through social media. Some other networking actions can even be done directly through online. TaskRabbit, Findspark, Glassdoor, as well as many other sites allow people to go online and complete tasks and take part in online networking webinars in order to network directly from home. Taking part in social media, and following important people in the industry online is the other great way to network online. However, before you do anything, you should make sure to have your own social media up to date.

    1. Twitter networking tips: For Twitter make sure to complete your entire profile. Post a good icon image consisting of a headshot with a single colored background. Once that is done, make sure to follow important people and companies in your industry that have a huge pull in the networking world, and while you do this, share valuable content to be noticed. Finally, always make sure to ask questions on your Tweets to get people engaged with your page and make sure that you, yourself stay engaged with others in the social networking circles that surround you.

    2. Linked In Networking tips: For LinkedIn, make sure to use a profile summary, and once again use a professional photo with similar description as the requirement for your Twitter account. Make sure to always grow your network and join groups that can be of networking value to you. Look on sites such as linkedin.com/alumni to stay connected with your past networking circles, always pay attention to recommendations, and upload projects and portfolios whenever completed. And once again, most importantly, STAY ENGAGED!

    3. Sending emails for requesting informational conversation: Sometimes, the best way to network and really get to know more about a company is to set up an informational interview. From these you can learn valuable information about a company, and really connect with a circle that if you desire to work within, you should understand and connect to. When sending an informational interview/conversation email request make sure to keep it short and simple, sticking to the three main points: Who are you? Why are you writing to them? How much time is this going to take? Making sure to keep your email short and concise will give you the best way to become an interest of connection to the person you are emailing.

  3. Finding networking contacts offline: Offline is just as important, if not more important, than online networking. Going to events can be the best ways to make in person connections. Making in person connections gets people to know you by not only name, but face, which can help you in the long run when you show up to an office for an interview and see people you know. Like what was said in the panel, “Every time you step outside, it is an interview.” Stay friendly and get to know the people around you, even the people next to you in class, to ensure a great networking circle in every aspect of your life.

  4. How to build a relationship via networking: The steps to building a relationship are crucial. First, make sure to send a personalized message introducing yourself. After the meeting, make sure to send a thank you email consisting of follow up thoughts and questions that you still may have. After one month, consider reaching out to send a virtual hand, if needed. Four to six months past that, plan to meet up for coffee, or setup a phone chat. Nine to twelve months after your original introduction, consider an email or phone call consisting of personal and professional updates in order to stay in touch. After this, always send some reconnect emails and attempt to repeat the same cycle in order to keep your networking connection strong.

Next steps: What can you do right now? Make networking manageable; do it a little bit at a time and challenge yourself. Right now start establishing your networking skills by meeting 2 new contacts each week, schedule one informational interview a month, and attempt to reconnect with one person you’ve lost touch with each week. Reach out to existing contacts, takes notes for personal touch, select a tracking mechanism and schedule check-in points. You can even consider scheduling an appointment with a career coach to review your networking plan and help with your correspondence. This is available right now at NYU’s Wasserman Center. All of these opportunities are available to you right now. Why not take advantage of them?

Wasserman Center Meet Ups

Informational interviews can be a great way to develop your career path: allowing you a chance to gain insight into a job field and to make some new connections. However, if you don’t know what to expect or how to prepare, it can be a stressful situation. Here are some tips to make sure you get the most out of your informational interview.

Do:

  1. Research the company and the role. You want to keep informational interviews pretty short (about 30 minutes), so make sure that you’re using your time during the interview to learn some insider details about the job or the company. A good resource can be the Vault Career Insider, which can be accessed through your home page on CareerNet.
  2. Bring a resume. Even though you aren’t asking for a job (more on that later!), you want to let the interviewer get a good picture of your experience so they can give you information and advice that’s most relevant to you. This also can help them remember details about you if you maintain a relationship with the interviewer.
  3. Prepare questions that really interest you. Reflect on what matters to you in a job – hours, mobility, culture, etc. Some common questions are: What do you see as the potential for growth in this field? What can I do now to help me find employment in this field? What do you like about your career and what don’t you like about it?

Don’t:

  1. Ask for a job, internship, or interview. The interviewer granted you the informational interview as a chance for learning and networking, and if you turn it into a job hunt it will likely turn them off and hurt your reputation. After the interviewer gets to know you, it’s possible that they will keep you in mind for future hiring needs. But now is not the time.
  2. Show up without a goal in mind. If you don’t have a clear purpose for the interview, your questions and interactions might seem disjointed. Before the interview, think about what you really want to achieve: build professional contacts, learn how to break into a field, decide what role might be best for you, etc.
  3. Come too early. An informational interview usually benefits you more than it benefits the interviewer, so you don’t want to assume too much of their time. Stick to the schedule as much as possible.

Not sure that your informational interviewing skills are up to par? Schedule an appointment with a career counselor or come to a Wasserman Meet Up for a chance to chat with Wasserman staff and employers in a relaxed setting.

Meet Ups are coming up on Friday February 28, Tuesday March 11, and Thursday March 27. Click the links for more details and to RSVP.

Lessons Learned: How to Network During the Holidays

Recently, Rachel Frint from the NYU Wasserman Center @ SCPS hosted a webinar on how to network during the holidays.  In case you missed it, here are some tips for how to build your network during the holiday season.

Job Seekers

If you are searching for a new job, there is no need to slow down your search during the holidays.  While some companies may slow their hiring during this time of year, not all of them do!  Some companies may hire seasonal employees, or they may be getting ready to post new opportunities at the beginning of the New Year.

Holiday Parties & Gatherings

Even though it is a busy time of year, try to make some effort to attend holiday events.  Networking around the holidays is often more informal, so a formal, professional pitch may not be appropriate at these events.  Avoid the “hard sell” during these events.  Also remember to exude the holiday spirit and be positive and happy in your conversations.  Don’t let any negative energy or anxiety about your job search influence your conversations.

Company Holiday Party

Attending your company’s holiday gathering is a great way to network with your colleagues and increase your internal visibility.  Make an effort to talk to people who you don’t know well or who you would like to work with more.  Be an active listener, ask good questions, and be present in your conversations with colleagues.

Family Gatherings

Don’t discount family members just because they don’t work in the exact field you want to get into; they may be able to connect you with people.  Talk about your skills and career goals with your family and ask for specific, reasonable requests.  Don’t ask them to help you get a job, but instead ask for an introduction, advice on your job or internship search, or advice on your resume.

Friend’s Party

These settings tend to be very casual, but you can still approach them strategically.  Instead of bouncing around talking to as many people as possible, focus more on building strong, lasting connections, or even rekindling connections with people you haven’t see in a while.  You can bring your business card with you, but leave your resume at home.

Home for the Holidays

If you are going home for the holidays, consider building connections with people in your hometown.  Schedule some meetings to re-kindle your relationship with some of your friends or former colleagues.  Do some research and find NYU alumni based in your hometown and schedule an informational interview.

Holiday Networking Follow Up

The holiday season is a good excuse to reach out to contacts you haven’t spoken to in a while.  Send a personalized “Happy Holidays” or “Happy New Year” email message to your professional contacts.

For anyone you meet over the holidays, be sure to send a follow up email right away, but save the job seeking conversation until after the New Year.  Also, remember to check in with your contacts a few months later so that you stay top of mind.

Meet with a Wasserman Career Counselor to discuss your specific strategy for networking during the holidays.

November Spotlight: Networking!

Do your networking skills need disaster relief? Check out Wasserman’s networking resources!

October left us with a lot to clean up! We made it through the difficulty of Hurricane Sandy, and are ready to kick off Networking November! Over 80% of jobs are found through networking, so it is crucial that you have these skills mastered. Practicing networking and putting yourself in situations to practice these skills will set you apart from the massive pool of applicants many job postings will receive. Whether you are an extrovert who is extremely comfortable working the crowd, or an introvert who would prefer crafting a well thought out e-mail, putting yourself out there is imperative.

Luckily, the Wasserman Center provides you with a plethora of resources and opportunities to ensure you can master these skills!

VIRTUAL RESOURCES

It is great (especially for introverts) to begin the networking process online. However, keep in mind that to be the most effective it is important to go beyond the computer screen and toward speaking to contacts in real life settings.

Mentor Network: The Mentor Network is accessed through your NYU CareerNet account, and is a database of professionals who have expressed interest in supporting NYU students in their career development. Fore more information, and to gain access, come to the Wasserman Center during walk-in hours.

Wasserman Center Student and Alumni Career Connections LinkedIn Group: This group consists of over 5,000 members, and offers you the opportunity to begin discussions or network individually with NYU alumni!

IN-PERSON RESOURCES

When networking in any capacity you want to make sure you are being professional, and not overly aggressive.  A career counselor can help you with an individualized approach to networking in the industries and organizations you are hoping to target.

Employer Information Sessions: There’s a fine line between being assertive and being aggressive. Make sure that you let other people speak and contribute to the conversation in a reasonable manner. If you don’t feel like there’s a chance to communicate as much as you would like with an employer, get the employer’s business card and follow up with a thoughtful e-mail. You can even ask to meet for coffee to further discuss how you can make yourself a competitive applicant for his/her organization. So many employers tell us that 200 people will be at their information session, and only 2-3 people will follow up afterwards. Make sure to take the time to do so! To find out when the next Information Sessions are taking place you can go to Events > Information Sessions in your NYU CareerNet account.

Social Media and Networking for Your Job Search Seminars: This seminar is facilitated by NYU Wasserman Center staff, and give you the opportunity to learn how to professionally leverage social media for a productive job search. To find out when the next seminar is taking place, go to Events > Seminars in NYU CareerNet..

Wasserman Special Events: Events like our Boot Camp Series, and plethora of graduate student events offer numerous opportunities to meet with employers and practice your networking skills! We try our best to always have a great cross-section of employers so that there is someone who could be useful to anyone’s career interests!

Networking November has officially begun! We’ll continue to discuss networking tools and resources to help you network your way to the job of your dreams.

Summer Must- Reads: More books to help your career development (Part II)

 

Stay on top of your game with these books all written to help you achieve your career goals. These bestsellers will change the way you see the world, interact and handle any obstacle that comes your way. Enjoy!

The Art of Mingling: Proven Technique for Mastering Any Room, by Jeanne Martinet

Don’t let your wallflower ways keep you from getting what you want. The Art of Mingling offers great tips on how to work any room. Trust us, after this you’ll be the life of the party… or at least be able to network better.

 

 

 

 

Never Eat Alone: And Other Secrets to Success, One Relationship at a Time, by Keith Ferrazzi & Tahl Raz

Want to know the key to success? According to Ferrazzi and Raz it is networking. Learning how to cultivate relationships is an important part of life. Never Eat Alone teaches readers how to make connections using their handy outlines and strategies. The important thing to remember is that it isn’t just about getting what you want; it’s also about making sure those who are important to you also get what they want.

 

 

Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office: 101 Unconscious Mistakes Women Make that Sabotage Their Careers, by Lois P. Frankel

 Who would have thought that everything your mother taught you is completely wrong in dealing with your career ambitions. Not to worry Frankel has you covered and will educate you on what you need as a woman to continue to make that climb to the top.

 

 

 

 

The World is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century, by Thomas L. Friedman

Understanding the world we live in is crucial in navigating today’s job markets. Whatever your career path The World is Flat gives the reader an understanding of the events that have shaped today’s ‘flat’ and fast globalized world. Friedman explains how this happened and demystifies complex foreign policy and economic issues that are currently shaping the global.

 

 

Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities, by Martha C. Nussbaum

In Not for Profit, Nussbaum urges us to consider the issues that arise when we put economic growth ahead of humanitarian growth. For students interested in the Non-Profit sector this book is a must read because it takes a look at the impact that education focused on trade rather than knowledge has on our society.

 

 

 

Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High, by Kerry Patterson

Crucial Conversations offers readers a guide to handling life’s most difficult conversations. Learn how to be persuasive, talk about almost anything, and prepare for nearly every situation with Patterson’s six-minute mastery technique.