Category Archives: Part-time Job Search

In Case You Missed It: Day In The Life at ZocDoc

Did you miss Shayne’s day in Operations with @ZocDoc? If so, click on the link below for a recap.

Sound like a place you’d like to work? Apply on CareerNet, Job ID: 921201 for the Part-time Patient Operations Associate

Three Ways To Make The Most Of Your Career Fair

Murshed Chowdhury acts as an advisor to both companies and individuals who are looking for assistance in technology talent acquisition and development. He has served as the CEO & Partner of Infusive Solutions Inc. since its establishment in 2001. Prior to Infusive, he worked at several recruiting agencies where he honed his skills and rose the ranks within the organization before founding his own company.

With over 15 years of technology placement experience, Murshed has helped secure some of the most competitive technical positions for his clients at some of the world’s most prestigious firms. He holds a Bachelors Degree in Political Science from Fordham University.

Murshed is passionate about helping technologists develop themselves both professionally and technically.

Here, he shares valuable insight into achieving career fair success. Think about his tips as you prepare for the NYU Career Fair next fall.

Recently, our company had a table at a career fair and I noticed that many of the students had a puzzled look on their face. One student caught my attention in particular. I asked her, “What are you looking to do?” This is typical company talk at a career fair, and she responded, “I have no idea, and I really don’t know what I’m supposed to do here.” We then spent the next few minutes discussing what she majored in, but more importantly, what she liked and what interested her.  After that, we came up with a game plan where I told her to visit the various companies that were present to see if they had roles that were closely aligned to what she wanted. I told her to have some real conversations, to get representatives’ business cards and if there was interest, she should follow up. Focus on quality versus quantity, because at the end of the day, you really need one job. You hopefully get many offers, but only need to work at one company. After a few hours, she came back to our booth to tell me that she found some really good prospects, met some really good people and had some genuine conversations.  She went on to say that the career fair was not that intimidating after all, and that, actually, it was kind of fun. She said, from now on, she would make the most of her career fairs and try to use it as a vehicle to further her career.

The career fair for many first time or recurring students can be a daunting task. I remember my first one as a senior in college. You’re told to make a great impression; how exactly is unclear. You’re told to make multiple copies of your resume, dress professionally and go. That’s pretty much the advice I was given.  When I actually walked into the conference hall, I saw a lot of unfamiliar faces, got nervous and wasn’t sure what do next.

So, how do you make the most of your career fair experience? It really comes down to 3 simple steps in my opinion: have a plan, meet (network) and effectively follow up.

PLAN

Like any other successful outcomes, it all starts with proper planning. Do some research once the career services center makes available the list of companies that are visiting your institution. Then, put together a list of the companies you want to meet with and find out where they will be. Some career fairs are so large, they can have companies housed in different buildings.  Map it out and really have a game plan. If you are going with a friend, ask them to split up and see where the crowds are and then come early or stay late to meet with them. The goal is to have some quality conversations, not just say hello and give them your resume. Part of your planning should include research so you can differentiate yourself from the competition. Knowing about what a company does can go a long way in building rapport. As most people ask the quintessential, “What do you do?” question, you are unique when you can walk up to an employer and tell them you are aware of what their business does because you’ve done your homework. I can tell you for a fact, that students who took the time to research my company and me, in some cases, always got more attention from me. Their resumes went to the top of the pile. I’m sure it is no different for other employers as well.  That leads me to my next point, which is, if you have the information on who will be attending from the company, please research them. It shows two things on your part: one, that you’re serious, and two, you are willing to go above and beyond but what most people are willing to do. In today’s digital age of social media and particularly, LinkedIn, that information is readily available.

NETWORK

Next, you should allocate time to meet with as many companies as you can. If you are like most college students, and people for that matter, you’re probably familiar with the big brand companies. But don’t overlook a really great startup or fast growing company that might be perfect for you. There are amazing opportunities at some of these lesser-known brands, as well. Remember, all big brands were small at one point, you never know where this company may go. Also, they wouldn’t be at the career fair if they weren’t growing and looking for great talent like you. Speak to the representatives of these companies and find out what they do. Get their business cards…why, I’ll get to shortly. Be curious and explore, the information you find about these firms, their product and services, can help you narrow down some of your choices, and help you decide what you might be interested in doing once you graduate.

FOLLOW UP

Finally, you need to make sure you effectively follow up. For those companies you’re keen on, send a quick email thanking them for meeting with you and express your interest in the next steps of their process. A week later, follow up with a phone call and reiterate your interest in the firm and/or opportunity. Now, going back to why I asked you to collect those cards, send an email to all the people you met with, even if you’re unsure about the firm or company. Ask them to please forward your information on to anyone they feel may have an interest in your background. Remember, just because that person may not have the ideal role for you at their organization doesn’t mean they don’t have a network of contacts that can be beneficial to you. By making a good impression, and effectively following up, you will already be ahead of your fellow students. Lack of effective follow up is one of the biggest ways to pass on potential opportunities. Most people do a poor job of this. Why? I have no idea, but in any case, this can be an opportunity for you. If you start, you stand to gain. Remember, successful people don’t just focus on doing great things, they make a concentrated effort to do the small things really great, and with consistency. It’s the little things that matter. Keep doing them well and often, and the results will speak for themselves.

Make the career fairs work for you. Remember, they are there to find you, so make the how and why as easy for them as possible.

Breaking into Baseball—Lessons Learned from Mark Smith at the Oakland A’s

By Jeannie Liakaris, Director, Wasserman Center for Career Development@SCPS

The Tisch Center for Hospitality, Tourism, and Sports Management and the Wasserman Center for Career Development@SCPS co-sponsored a workshop on “Breaking Into Baseball” hosted by Mark Smith of the Oakland A’s. Here is what he had to share.

First and foremost, there is no magical path to break into baseball. Mark himself started as an aerospace engineering student, entered into the Air Force for 8 years, and parlayed his passion for sports photography to break into baseball starting as a volunteer with the Utah Grizzlies and Ogden Raptors.

Here are his top tips:

1. You have to start somewhere, begin with your passions, interests and show it with a portfolio of those passions.

2. Become a “professional” ditch the “fan hat”; having an intricate understanding of the game, operations, skillsets and experiences in the industry will certainly help you in your journey, but don’t get caught rooting for the wrong team.

There are two arms to baseball, the “business side” which includes Legal, Accounting, PR, Marketing, Finance and so forth, and “player operations” which include Baseball Operations, Scouting and Player Development. Learn and understand the difference of each area. In addition to team jobs there are numerous ancillary companies that teams use for various functions throughout the season. Baseball America Directory, Baseball America Magazine, and Sports Business Journals are good publications that showcase the companies involved with sports teams.

3. Be aware of the various job categories that exist, such as: Administrative Services, Broadcast Media & Journalism, Communication, Executive “C” Level Management & Athletic Administration, Facility Operations, Information Technology, Marketing Management & Product Development, Professional Services, Retail & Supply Chain Management, Selling & Sales Management. Know the areas that you are targeting, as well as your value add for your specific areas of interest.

4. Be open to gaining experience in various market segments that are transferable, such as: Amateur Athletics & Governing Bodies, Corporate Arena/Sports Marketing Suppliers, Facilities/Live Events/Leisure, Health & Fitness, Sporting Goods Brands/Consumer, Strategic Alliance Groups and Teams & Professional Leagues.

5. Have a plan. Develop daily, weekly, monthly and yearly plans that are strategic and thoughtful in your approach to break into baseball. Mark recommended that students talk to at least 80 people in the industry to get a clear understanding of the roles and expectations that will be expected of you. He planned his exit strategy from the Air Force for a few years until he made his transition, and continuously refined his plan.

6. Foster and grow your network. Begin with friends, colleagues, professors and the NYU community to share personal and professional updates. It is never about “a job” but rather combine your skill set and experience into what you
are exploring next. Think about ways to provide value to your network before asking them for something (i.e. an introduction). Also, never let your relationships dwindle; keep them up as you move throughout your career.

7. Know the tools that are needed to be successful in your area of interest. For example, if you’re into Baseball Operations understanding the various topics in the industry is KEY; therefore reading FanGraphs,Journal of Quantitative
Analysis, Baseball America, and Baseball Prospectus in Sports is a must!

8. Be strategic with your resume. Put in metrics and accomplishments and be specific with your objective/profile.

9. Have a plan A, B, C, and D, and remember that you are never asking for a job, it is about having quality conversations about industry, trends, best practices in your field/discipline that will keep you top of mind with your network.

To learn more, follow Mark on Twitter @MarkASmith6, connect with him on LinkedIn, or email marka.smith6@gmail.com.

As an NYU student you have a vast amount of resources available to you to help plan your own personal career action plans. To get started, or help refine your strategy, schedule a career coaching appointment with the NYU Wasserman Center, NYU Wasserman Center@SCPS, and/or the NYU Tisch Center team to hone your approach. As we like to say, leverage all the resources
available to you!

Startup Thoughts and Considerations by 9th Dot

9th Dot is a consumer insight platform that gives individuals a “blank canvas” through which they can share their innovative ideas for improvements with businesses, and  rewards consumers for successfully doing so.  From the businesses’ perspective, they receive insightful information in the form of answers to questions they often don’t even know to ask. Last week, they offered up some advice for the interviewing process. Today, they share what to consider when starting your own business.

So you’re ready to take the plunge?  You’ve got a great idea for a product or service that solves a problem with a huge market size, you’re well underway with developing the technology and have written more code than you ever thought possible, you’re already crafting your go to market strategy and you’ve thought through a business model that will scale seamlessly as your startup grows like a weed.  Think again, and again after that.

Starting your own business is one of the most gratifying things a person can do. Take it from us, we thought careers in banking were exactly what we wanted until we had a taste of what entrepreneurship had to offer.  From seeing your app published in the app store to hearing your first potential customer express interest in your product, starting a business will give you countless ups, but also plenty of downs.

The advice we never received, well, maybe we never sought out, is what exactly to expect before starting a company.  Hindsight, 20/20 as it may be, will never provide all the answers, but it’s certainly given us some perspective that we’d like to share with other budding entrepreneurs.

With that in mind, we asked ourselves, what would have been most helpful for us before we started out?

First, for any milestone you set or any hurdle you want to cross in which you think things will become easier, guess again.  For all the progress we’ve made, from writing the business plan, developing the technology, getting covered in TechCrunch, receiving a formal offer to join an accelerator program, and delivering our first demo to a customer, we’ve continued to learn one thing – it doesn’t get easier.  No matter what your strategy for building your business, whether it be widespread user adoption, monetization from corporate clients, or a combination of both, be prepared for a long slog ahead with progress likely to come at a rate slower than you expect.

The reality is that it takes time to build a business.  Viral marketing, hair on fire problem solving and growth hacking are all great buzz phrases, but none will be your cure all panacea as you look to build awareness of your startup and the problems it solves.  Be creative in your go to market strategy.  Ask friends and family what they think – they’ll likely give you feedback that will lead you to think and rethink ways in which you position your product in the marketplace.

Talk to your co-founders and then talk to them again.  Communication and candor is paramount.  As most investors will tell you, the number one reason startups fail is due to differences in opinions that co-founders are unable to reconcile.  Founders agreements and incorporation papers are a great start, but nothing takes the place of addressing key questions early on:

– Do all of the co-founders share similar risk appetites?  The idea of launching a startup is appealing to everyone, but tolerable by few.  Make sure from the get go that everyone is prepared to give your startup the time and attention necessary to succeed before doing anything else

-Do all of the co-founders have the financial cushion necessary to give it a shot? No matter how much progress you make, and how quickly you make it, you’re a long way from being comfortable.  Assuming you all have the patience to remain uncomfortable for a while, make sure everyone is prepared to forego a meaningful income for a while.

– Be prepared to change and change often.  Pivoting is another one of those buzzwords in the startup industry, but it’s much simpler than that.  While plenty of companies do truly pivot, in many cases more than once, we learned to simply not commit to anything other than having a clear vision to experiment and experiment often.  We thought we had it figured out – our idea solves a major problem, a problem we vetted across several major VCs by sharing our business plan before embarking on our journey.  We thought, “let’s get a little bit of media coverage and run some campaigns over Facebook and Twitter and we’ll be off to the races” – were we ever mistaken.  Dampen your expectations and then dampen them again.  Building a business and a brand takes time, endless amounts of energy, and above all a passion to see your idea grow into a business. Regardless of how good you think your go to market strategy is, think of as many ideas for building awareness for your product or service as you can, you’ll test them all and then think of some more.

Above all, don’t launch your startup because it’s cool to say you launched a startup or because you want to make a lot of money – neither of these reasons are likely to lead to success.  Start a business because you see a solution to a problem that will only seem obvious after you’ve exhaustively told your story to customers and investors, and likely the rest of the World.  We started 9th Dot, a crowdsourcing consumer insight platform, because we saw a tremendous opportunity to create a “win-win” situation for both consumers and businesses. Creating a platform that enables consumers to deliver insightful solutions to businesses and rewards them for doing so made a lot of sense to us, but it was the realization that we couldn’t live with ourselves if we did not that made us decide to slog it out.  As we were told by one VC investor early on, “Remember, entrepreneurs are mostly irrational, driven by a passion for creating something where there was nothing and realizing a vision they couldn’t ignore. It’s like jumping off a cliff and having to build a plane before you hit the ground!”

Innovative Interviewing Tips from 9th Dot

9th Dot is a consumer insight platform that gives individuals a “blank canvas” through which they can share their innovative ideas for improvements with businesses, and  rewards consumers for successfully doing so.  From the businesses’ perspective, they receive insightful information in the form of answers to questions they often don’t even know to ask. Here, they offer up some advice for the interviewing process.
Demonstrate an Approach to Problem-Solving

With such a competitive dynamic in today’s job market, individuals often try to do anything they can to gain an edge and differentiate themselves from other candidates. Interviewers want to be convinced you will be able to solve tough problems and help the corporation achieve its objectives.  Demonstrating your ability to think critically and provide innovative solutions to problems is a skill that can help you both secure the job during the interview, as well as climb the corporate ladder after you’ve landed the job.

It’s widely known that one of the best ways to answer interview questions is to make reference to situational experiences in which you successfully solved a problem.  Success stories tend to be tales of the defining moments in one’s career when an individual overcame significant challenges to succeed. These stories create a memorable impression and give the interviewer anecdotes about you that identify your ability to think creatively, solve complex problems and provide a solution.

While many experts suggest relating interview questions to similar situations from earlier in one’s career to demonstrate specific experience in dealing with similar situations, this can prove challenging for students preparing to enter the job market for the first time.  As we all know, challenges also tend to present opportunities.  When preparing for an interview, think of where you use or have used the company’s products or services.  Think about the context in which you used a product or service and ask yourself “what could have made that experience even better?”  Chances are that you’ve had several occasions like this where the proverbial “light bulb” went off in your head as to what would have made your experience better.  With the rise of crowdsourcing, businesses have quickly realized the value that can be derived from the consumers of their products and services – so much so that many large corporations have built full scale social media, consumer insight and guest experience teams to learn from and incorporate their customers’ innovative ideas for improving their products or services.

For instance, while preparing for a job at the corporate office of McDonald’s or Starbucks one may consider addressing an interview question centered around problem solving or critical thinking by drawing on an experience in which you observed an opportunity to improve something and exactly what your solution would entail.  Starbucks, through its MyStarbucksIdea platform, solicits and reviews ideas from its customers and has implemented just over 300 ideas over the last five years.  Things like WiFi, splash sticks and cake pops all originated through their crowdsourcing platform.  McDonald’s recently began testing third drive-thru windows after its social media team picked up a tweet from one customer who decided to share his idea over Twitter by saying, “I hate waiting in line for 20 minutes during the lunch rush at McDonald’s when all I want is a simple McFlurry.  Why doesn’t McDonald’s have a third drive-thru window for express orders?”  Innovative ideas like these gain the attention from senior leadership throughout an organization.

Companies like 9th Dot, a crowdsourcing consumer insight platform, are gaining traction by serving as the connection point between consumers and businesses.  By providing consumers with a “blank canvas” through which they can share their innovative ideas, and potentially earn rewards, 9th Dot enables consumers to showcase their bright ideas to businesses.  Having the right portal through which you can share your idea effectively gives you the podium in front of a large lecture hall filled with businesses wanting to learn what they can do better.

Consider that the next time an interviewer asks you to describe the last time you’ve solved a problem and how you went about doing so!

 

Why Social Media Profile Links Always Belong On Your Resume

by Alan Katzman, Founder of Social Assurity LLC

Many articles have been written warning about social media’s impact on the job search relying on the blurred lines between personal and professional information to make their point. With a predilection towards possible negative outcomes, the prevailing default advice favors hiding social media activities from potential employers. This perspective and the prevailing analysis is dated, misplaced and inevitably leads to irrelevant outcomes.

By comparison, understanding the distinction between private versus public information provides a better backdrop for the contextual argument and offers concrete guidance for all of us to follow when it comes to using social media for career advantage.

Many will argue that pointing hiring managers to your social media profiles is not necessarily a good idea. They support their argument by claiming your resume should be as concise and to-the-point as possible, and listing your social media profiles will take up valuable space. They also argue that most of our social accounts are personal, not for business, so putting them on the resume is often irrelevant.

Addressing the last point first, whenever we post to social media we are essentially publishing that information for public consumption. You should consider anything posted online to be “public” no matter what your “privacy” settings are. Wikipedia defines social media as “the interaction among people in which they create, share, and/or exchange information and ideas in virtual communities and networks.” Therefore, whether the posting is professional, political, religious, familial, sexual, sophomoric or intellectual in nature, by voluntarily placing it in the public domain via social media, we are sharing that information with others and it becomes a part of our individual discoverable public record.

Each one of us has every opportunity to keep our personal thoughts, beliefs and experiences private and off the public record by simply choosing not to post them to social media. Once posted, however, building a fence around what is personal versus what is professional is virtually impossible. Can we rationally rely on the Internet to properly filter, categorize and respect public posts of personal information? Of course not.

In the context of resumes and the job search, remember that the ultimate hiring decision has always been a subjective one and most often comes down to personal characteristics and soft skills. Interviews and reference checks were once the sole domain of determining whether a candidate is “likeable” and whether that candidate possesses the personality traits to work well with the team and/or mesh with the company’s culture. For decades now, responsible employers have been performing pre-employment background screenings looking at candidates’ credit ratings as well as their criminal and civil court records which can all be classified as personal information (yet readily available to the public). Social media has encroached onto this domain and now provides employers with a fast, easy, efficient and inexpensive way to assess a candidate’s character, maturity, authenticity, credibility and overall “likeability” before incurring the costs of an interview and background screening.

According to a recent JobVite survey, just about every employer will eventually take a look at a candidate’s social media activities as part of the recruiting/hiring decision process. Therefore, making that inspection easier and less time consuming by being transparent and directing employers to your social media profile links will not only be appreciated by the potential employer but can also be advantageous to the candidate as well. Directing employers to social media profile links eliminates the risk of mistaken identity especially if the candidate has a common name. What could be worse than being disqualified from a job because of a stupid post made by someone with the same name?

Moreover, businesses are coming to realize that their prospects, customers and clients are also using social media to learn about the businesses and employees they are doing business with. So the lines between personal and professional are even further blurred as an employee’s personal life as reflected on Facebook and Twitter may attach to and potentially impact the reputation of the employer. Realizing this, employers now possess a pecuniary interest in the personal social media activities of their employees.

Given all of these arguments, we believe it is imperative for candidates to always provide links to their social media profiles on their resumes.

Social Assurity suggests placing a URL to a prepared social media landing page at the top of your resume alongside your telephone number and email address. This obviates the need to take up valuable real estate on your resume by listing each of your social media profiles separately.

Google Plus works extremely well as a landing page URL. The Google Plus URL is clean and descriptive (i.e. https://plus.google.com/+Socialassurity/about) and provides a robust “About” page where candidates can not only publish links to all of their social media profile pages such as LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram, etc. but also link to any publications, blogs and personal websites. Google Plus also provides a place where the candidate can write their own story for anyone to see using a far friendlier template than LinkedIn. Google Plus seems to ensure a high ranking of your personal page on Google Search and with strategic use of keywords, also provides good SEO so recruiters who might be searching through the hidden job market will be more apt to find you.

In conclusion, learning how to curate and manage your social media profiles in support of your job search has quickly become a fundamental life skill. Providing people with access to your profiles shows you have nothing to hide and also shows you have a fundamental understanding of how social media integrates with the realities of the business world.

The first step in leveraging social media to make a powerful and meaningful virtual first impression upon employers is to make sure you can be found rather than deactivating social media accounts or creating aliases to remain hidden. Candidates must view their social media as an asset as opposed to a liability by saying “if they’re going to be looking at me then let me give them something to see.” For example, you can begin using Twitter as a professional networking tool or create a Pinterest board that visually mirrors your resume. It is also important for your resume and LinkedIn profile to be completely in sync and to properly categorize your Facebook friends with privacy controls set accordingly.

Given the large number of applicants to the most competitive jobs and the continuing growth of the hidden job market, it is imperative that serious applicants look at their digital presence as an asset and a natural extension of their professional resumes in order to be found through the social network and then to set themselves apart from other qualified candidates.

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Industry Insights: Careers in Human Resources

Tingting Zhou, a Master’s candidate in the Human Reource Management and Development Program at NYU who is expecting to graduate May 2015, and Ross Brand, a Master’s candidate in the Human Resource and Development Program at NYU who is expecting to graduate May 2014, both attended Industry Insights: Careers in Human Resources on Friday March 28th.  The NYU Wasserman Center@SCPS hosted a panel featuring Slyne Louissaint, Real Hospitality, Tim Collins, IBM, Annmarie Payne, Blue Engine, Jeanelle Degraffenreid, First Protocol, and Christina Caruso, Tommy. They are from different industries such as hospitality, fashion, IT (IBM), non-profit, and event services.

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Here are six valuable tips shared by the panelists:

1. Know your business and brand

As an HR professional, it is critical to know your business. HR professionals are the first point of contact at their organizations and serve as examples for other employees. You need to be conscious of your role in protecting and maintaining the brand by how you conduct yourself and your knowledge of the company. Know the business, its financials and its competitors. Be able to speak the language and utilize the terminology that people in your business and industry employ.

2. Data is your friend

More firms are leveraging HR predictive analytics to obtain insights on which candidates to hire, how to identify the factors contributing to successful employee performance and what measures are more likely to retain key talent. Analytics is all about data. Excel skills are essential for carrying out many HR roles. HR professionals can stand out from their peers by understanding how to use Excel (macros, pivot tables), learning about workforce analytics and predictive analytics, and knowing how to talk about financial information.

3. Pick the right industry for you

HR professionals increase their chances for success when they find organizations and industries that fit their personalities. The panelists agreed on the importance of being knowledgeable about the industry in which you want to work and having a hunger to learn more about that industry. It is critical both to research different industries when searching for a new opportunity and know yourself. Jeanelle Degraffenreid mentioned conducting informational interviews to learn from professionals in your preferred industry.  Slyne Louissant added that if you have experience in another industry and want to switch, be open to trying new things and focus on your transferable skills.  You can think about your past experiences and highlight those that apply in your current search.  Finally, don’t forget to ask questions in interviews. While the interviewer is trying to find out if you are the right fit for the organization, you have every right to determine if the company and department will be a good place for you. For example, are you more comfortable carrying out tasks individually or working on a team? Use the opportunity to ask questions in an interview to gain valuable insights on what it is like to work at that organization.

4. Network, network and network

Some panelists believe 90% of jobs come from networking. Apart from LinkedIn, Tim Collins also recommended Twitter as a great tool for learning from, and interacting with, professionals in your industry. Read articles from publications such as Harvard Business Review posted by respected professionals and industry leaders you follow. Join Twitter Chats such as #TChat (Talent Culture Chat), which focuses on talent. Collins also shared a program at IBM called Social HR to illustrate the point that even the most conservative organizations are seeing value in going social and that social media is another area in which aspiring HR practitioners can contribute to their organizations. Christina Caruso recommended being authentic in social media and in your online brand while also being careful with what you share.  Annmarie Payne added that you should know what you have accomplished and come up with three things to brand yourself.  This will leave a positive impression on the people with whom you are networking.

5. Think outside the box

While everyone knows the importance of developing LinkedIn contacts and applying to jobs through company websites, creative people have landed jobs by visiting the company and even interacting directly with the CEO. Of course you will have to do sufficient research on the company and industry before implementing such creative job search tactics. Some panelists believe the paper resume is dying and that your online brand is becoming more important. Many applicants are also sending video resumes to HR. Candidates, who are good on camera, can engage the audience with more impact on video than on a paper resume. Nonetheless, it is still critical to have a paper resume that is appropriate for your target industry and free of grammatical errors and other typos. A splash of color may work well on a resume for a firm in a creative industry, but it might be a turnoff in a more traditional organization. All the HR professionals agree it is the time for jobs to chase candidates rather than candidates chasing jobs.

6. Look beyond traditional HR specialties

Compensation and Recruiting are fine career choices, but you can find opportunities to make a name for yourself and advance your career by contributing in such areas as Global Mobility, Diversity, Analytics and HR Technology. Panelists also recommended obtaining HR certifications.

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United Women In Business (UWIB)

After committing time and personal resources, many students hope to convert their internship into a full time offer. But where do you even begin when trying to make the most out of this experience? See below for tips from the United Women in Business on how to impress your new employer and maximize your potential.

Start off on the right foot

  • Do your homework and research the company in depth before you begin

  • Start paying attention to industry trends and news so you’re able to chat about relevant topics with your new co-workers

  • Think about your personal and professional goals for the semester and write them down

Throughout your internship

  • Connect with management to discuss how you are meeting their expectations

  • Make your goals known and keep track of your progress

  • Ask leadership for feedback of your performance

Finish Strong

  • Don’t coast – continue asking for feedback and taking on more responsibilities

  • Be visibly engaged with the office and especially during meetings

  • If interested, meet with management to discuss future full time opportunities

Please join us on Tuesday, April 15 at NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development to learn more about how to make the most out of your internship!

The United Women in Business Foundation (UWIB) and The Undergraduate Stern Women in Business (USWIB) are thrilled to present at New York University’s Wasserman Center for Career Development: “What Your Summer Internship Can Do For You

Students invest substantial time, precious summer days, and personal resources into obtaining and participating in internships. This fun and engaging workshop is designed to enable students to get to most out of their internship experience.
Students will learn how to:
> Make an impact in three months or less at the office
> Build lasting relationships that will help them further their careers
> Transition from administrative work into skills-based learning experiences
> Avoid common “intern mistakes” and distinguish themselves as top talent

RSVP here!

Jump Start Your Freelance Career

According to Harvard Business Review, freelancers were knights from the Middle Ages who acted as “free lancers” – knights who worked for anyone who would pay them. Today, a freelance or independent worker is “a person who pursues a profession without a long-term commitment to any one employer.”

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But… is freelancing right for you? The perks are enticing: wake up late, work in your pajamas, take a jog at your leisure, and dictate your schedule on your terms. Whether you do it full-time or on the side, freelance work can have its benefits. Learn from professional freelancers across a variety of industries at the upcoming Job Search for Freelance Professionals on Thursday, April 3 from 12:30 to 1:30pm here at the Wasserman Center.

Get to know a few of our featured alumni freelancers below! RSVP HERE!

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Dan Feld (Moderator)

B.A. Marketing and Sociology, NYU ‘06

Creator & Host, Prologue Profiles

Dan Feld is the creator and host of the inspirational interview podcast series, Prologue Profiles, featuring the stories of Gen Y’ers taking risks and working hard to go after their career dreams. Dan had previously left his desk job in NYC to become a school teacher in Mississippi, and failed dramatically – which led him to create Prologue Profiles. Dan (Stern ’06) now also speaks at schools to inspire students to make their own career dreams happen.

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Carina Storrs

M.A. Journalism, NYU ‘09

Science and Health Writer

Carina Storrs is a freelance writer, researcher, and editor based in New York. She has written about medical technology, mental health, nutrition, sustainability, and a range of other science and health topics. Her work has appeared in Scientific American and The Scientist magazines, and on the websites of Health.com and Seleni, among other publications. Before freelancing, Carina spent two years working as a researcher and reporter for Health.c om and Health magazine. She completed her PhD in microbiology at Columbia University in 2006 and got her master’s in journalism from NYU’s Science, Health and Environmental Reporting Program in 2009. More information, and links to stories she has written, can be found at carinastorrs.com

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Will Hogben

Freelance App Designer

B.A. Game Design, NYU ‘09

“I had a childhood interest in making video games which required me to learn software development.  While at NYU I began taking on small software projects as an alternative to work study.  In 2007 I began freelance iOS development working for a small shop in Brooklyn.  The demand for iOS development was explosive.  I began contracting in earnest in 2008, and grew it into a small business in 2009.

“My apps have been in The New York Times, demoed live by Martha Stewart and awarded Best in Category at the Consumer Electronics Expo. They’ve been tweeted by Zuckerberg, had #1 in Entertainment for over a week, and downloaded by more than 18 million people.

“Freelance software development is technically and personally demanding.  I hope my experiences, both good and bad, will help future freelancers get started.”

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Diane Leon-Ferdico

Assistant Adjunct Faculty in Mixed Media, NYU-SCPS

B.A. Art History, M.A. Humanities and Social Thought, NYU

Diane Leon Ferdico has been a practicing artist for the past 4 decades. Her enthusiasm for the creative process is a lifelong endeavor. She quotes, “Being an artist takes stamina and perseverance” and she lives by that motto. Diane graduated NYU with a BA in art history from SCPS with honors and her MA in Humanities and Social Thought from the Graduate School of Arts and Science. As an adjunct associate professor of arts in the School of Continuing and Professional Studies, in the McGhee degree division she has taught Collage/Mixed Media and the Fundamentals of Painting since 1995.

Her abstract work and articles has been featured in The NY Times, The Queens Courier, Ovation TV and in the US Embassy in Lima, Peru. She maintains a home base in Spain and travel is a constant influence on her work.

Diane also writes personal essays and has worked as an art editor for HerCircleezone.com. Prior experience began in 1964 as an administrative assistant in the music industry where she worked securing visas for the Beatles and Rolling Stone. Throughout her years of day jobs, art has always been the driving force in her life and something that she continues to express each day.

JOB SEARCH FOR FREELANCE PROFESSIONALS

Thursday, April 3, 12:30-1:30pm, Wasserman Center, Presentation Room B

Featured Professionals:

Are you interested in freelancing, but not sure how to do it? Need more details on what it means to work independently? Learn more from a panel of professionals who use a variety of tools and resources to sustain freelance careers.

Google Community Leaders

Ethan Rosenberg is a junior at Loyola University New Orleans, where he’s participated in Google’s Community Leaders Program for the past two years. The CLP is focused on creating a sustainable web ecosystem and increasing digital literacy by connecting communities, businesses, entrepreneurs, and nonprofits with local student talent. Below, Ethan describes his experiences in the program, which is currently recruiting NYU students for its Harlem chapter.

For the past two years, I’ve had the opportunity to work with the Google Community Leaders Program in New Orleans. When our team first came together in September 2012, we were briefed with the following statistic:

Ninety-seven percent of internet users look online for local products, services, or charitable opportunities, yet 64 percent of businesses in Louisiana do not have a website.

If the vast majority of people are searching for local products and services online, and a business doesn’t have a web presence, they are virtually invisible in the eyes of the consumer.

So, 16 of us from four universities were split into four teams, and each team was assigned to a neighborhood in New Orleans. We were tasked with getting as many businesses online as we could leading up to Super Bowl XLVII in February 2013.

We started by canvassing our neighborhoods for businesses and working with the business owners to get them on Google Maps and using Google Tools. By February 2013, the CLP had empowered 160 businesses to get online!

As we’ve continued our work, and as the program has expanded, I’ve been able to combine my passion for music with the mission of the CLP. I now lead a team that teaches musicians how to expand their business by empowering them to use internet tools.

Through the work that my team has done with the CLP, the Mayor’s Office of New Orleans approached me to organize a series of presentations and workshops for the musicians of New Orleans to better understand the business of music.

Additionally, while I’ve been involved with the CLP, I’ve co-organized the first two Startup Weekend events in New Orleans, the second of which was a featured as part of Google’s Global Entrepreneurship Week!

The Community Leaders Program has been an amazing opportunity to get involved in the community. The program combines community engagement work with professional development, and gives individuals an opportunity to be a part of something greater than themselves.

Interested in being a Google Community Leader in Harlem during the 2014–2015 school year? Apply today! through the website or on CareerNet, Job ID: 924742. Applications are due by Friday, April 4th, 2014. Please note that participants will be required to commit 10 hours per week to CLP-related work.