Category Archives: Professionalism

Employer Insights: How the Engineering & Technology Fair Worked For Me

by Anthony Giorgio

Way back at the turn of the millennium, I was studying Computer Science at Polytechnic University, on the former Long Island campus.  During my freshman year, I learned about the annual on-campus career fair that was held in the spring.  I had visited the career services office, and they were offering students the chance to volunteer at the fair to help setup the various tables and booths.  I decided to take them up on their offer, and arrived at the fair early in the morning.  I carried boxes of tchotchkes and  marketing materials from the recruiters’ cars into the gym, and struck up a few conversations.  Eventually the fair started, and the horde of students arrived.  Being a lowly freshman, I didn’t have much to offer, and was politely rejected from every table.  I didn’t expect anything different, and resigned myself to a fate of again spending summer break working for McDonald’s.  

As the fair wound down, I helped the various recruiters pack up their booths, and they gladly rewarded me with a plentiful supply of keychains, pens, stress balls, and other items emblazoned with corporate logos.  There was one company, however, that I spent more than a few minutes chatting with.  They were a local Hewlett-Packard reseller, who also employed software engineers for consulting work.  The recruiter seemed to like me, and said they would be in touch.

A week or so later, they called me up and offered me a summer internship.  I was elated, since I didn’t expect to be doing technical work as a freshman.  I ended up working there for the entire summer, performing a variety of intern-related IT roles.  As my role was winding down, and I was preparing to return to school, the company hired another intern to replace me.  He was another student at Poly, but he was a senior and preparing to graduate.  In the few weeks we worked together, we became acquaintances, and learned to respect each other’s abilities.  I sometimes spoke to him during the school year, but since he was older than I, our social circles didn’t cross very much.

The next summer I again attended the career fair, and this time I managed to land an internship at Symbol Technologies (now part of Motorola).  I was fortunate enough that my resume had the right key technical terms, and the recruiter gave me a callback.  I spent the next two years working there, as my class schedule permitted.  It gave me excellent insights into how the corporate world worked, and invaluable experience in software development.

As I entered my senior year, I began to look for full-time employment, since I needed a “real” job.  I decided to attend the fall career fair at the Brooklyn campus, since I felt that waiting for the spring one on Long Island might be too late.  I put on my interview suit, printed out a stack of resumes, and climbed on the coach bus the school chartered for the occasion.  I felt confident, since I had three years of work experience, and I was about to complete a combination BS-MS program in Computer Science.   Still, I was nervous – what if nobody hires me?  What if I can’t get an offer?  I put those thoughts to rest as the bus parked in downtown Brooklyn.  

When I entered the career fair, I was surprised at how crowded it was.  The Long Island fairs usually had a decent turnout, but the Brooklyn one was on an entirely different level.  The popular companies had lines 20 students     deep, and there were so many tables they spilled over into the lobby of the library.  As I made my way around the fair, I met with the recruiters, shook their hands, passed out resumes, and recited my spiel innumerable times.  Eventually I made my way to the IBM table.  As luck would have it, my former classmate and colleague from my first internship had returned to recruit!  After the perfunctory greeting, he introduced me to the hiring manager, and we chatted briefly.  He seemed to like me, and told me to head to the career services office after the fair.  I wasn’t quite sure what would happen next, but I eagerly agreed.

After a nervous lunch, I headed over to the career services office, where I saw a number of other students.  Some I recognized from my campus, while others I had never seen before.  The woman in charge of the office said that the representatives from IBM would be individually interviewing us, since we had passed their pre-screening.  When it was my turn, I met with the recruiter once more, and talked for about a half-hour in a private office.  He asked me about my academic career, my work experience, and a number of other things to feel me out as a candidate.  The interview drew to a close, and he congratulated me, shaking my hand.  He promised that the hiring manager would be in touch, and to prepare for a phone interview.  I was pleased, but somewhat unsure.  I had never interviewed on a phone before, and didn’t really know what to expect.  

A few weeks later, I received an email from the hiring manager, asking when it would be convenient for me to talk.  We set up a date and time, and proceeded to have a pleasant conversation with each other.  This interview was rather similar to my previous one with IBM, where the interviewer seemed more interested about my personality and how I would fit in, rather than my technical skills.  At the end of the call, the manager said that he was going to recommend I come up for an in-person interview, and that someone from Human Resources would be in touch.  Within a few days, I received another email, this time inviting me to the IBM facility in Poughkeepsie, NY.  The HR representative gave me all the details, including directions to the site, what hotel I would be staying at, how to be reimbursed for my travel expenses, and what restaurants I should eat at.

As my in-person interview date approached, I realized that this would be the longest drive I have ever taken, and I would be doing it solo.  It was also before GPS or smartphones were common, so I made sure to print the route out using Mapquest directions, and brought along a paper map backup.  I packed an overnight bag, climbed into my old Honda, and headed north.  After two hours, I arrived in Poughkeepsie, and managed to find my hotel.  I checked in, grabbed a bite to eat, and prepared my suit for the interview tomorrow.  

The next morning, I headed over to the IBM facility on Route 9.  Once inside, I joined a large number of other candidates preparing to take the IPAT exam (a standardized test given to job applicants).  I spent about 90 minutes taking the test, and then we were all instructed to wait for our hiring managers to pick us up from the lobby.  A short while later, my manager came by, and I recognized him as being the same one from the career fair.  He explained that his job was to take me around the site and bring me to various groups that had job openings.  We drove around to a number of different offices, and I met a few different hiring managers.  Each one had a specific opening, for either software development or test.  The management team also took me out to lunch, which I later found out was so they could see how I handled social situations.  At the end of the day, the recruiting manager asked which of the positions I’d like to work in.  I ended up picking the sole development one, since it seemed the most interesting.  

I drove home the next day, retracing the hundred-mile journey downstate.  I thought I did well, but I wasn’t sure if I would get a written job offer.  After the weekend, I returned to school, and resumed my classes.  As the weeks went by, I became more nervous about my chances.  I had another written job offer, but it had an expiration date attached.  I was hoping that I would simultaneously have two job offers in hand so I could pick the more appealing one.  Finally, in mid-February, a letter arrived from IBM with my official offer.  I decided to accept, and began communicating with a Human Resources representative on all the things required to start my employment.

In conclusion, pursuing a job opportunity with a large corporation can be a long journey.  Decisions take time, and multiple people are involved in many steps.  From the candidate’s perspective, the interminable wait can be nerve-wracking, but it’s all part of the process.  It’s also important to differentiate yourself from the rest of the candidates.  If you tell the recruiter what makes you a good hire, it will help them to recall you later on.  Remember, having the smarts to do the job only gets you so far, but effective communication, teamwork, and a positive attitude will get you to the prize!

If you’d like to work for IBM, we’re hiring!  We have a number of openings available in the Systems & Technology Group.  These are for both co-ops and entry-level positions.  If you’re interested, check out the following links:

System z Software Developer – Intern (Poughkeepsie, NY or Tuscon, AZ)

System z Software Developer – Entry Level (Poughkeepsie, NY; Tuscon, AZ; or San Jose, CA)

IBM Wave Software Developer – Entry Level (Poughkeepsie, NY)

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO MEET WITH IBM, STOP BY THEIR BOOTH AT THE ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY CAREER FAIR. RSVP THROUGH NYU CAREERNET BY CLICKING HERE!

10 Tips for Breaking into Brand Management & Strategy

On Tuesday, September 9th the Wasserman Center at the School of Professional Studies and the NYU Integrated Marketing Association hosted a career panel, “Breaking Into Brand Management & Strategy”. In case you missed it, we highlighted the 10 tips shared by panelists.

Panelists:

Amber Greviskes, SVP Professional and Enterprise Solutions, Qnary

Michelle Corbett, Manager, Talent Acquisition- Global Marketing, L’Oreal USA

Angie Chahin, Former Intern at Twitter and NYU School of Professional Studies student

1)    Begin to focus on the interest you aspire to and build a professional network of contacts. Panelists suggested that students always write down speaker names and follow up with them to show genuine interest in the field.

2)    Don’t forget about your professors. Leverage school presentations, classes, and events. NYU is here to help and professors have built careers in their industries over many years. Build relationships with your professors and use their office hours to learn more about breaking into their fields of expertise.

3)    Find an internship by presenting hidden competencies. Michelle shared that many companies, including L’Oreal, do not look for specific majors or experiences but rather hidden competencies such as curiosity and entrepreneurial spirit. Showing that no task is too big or small and that you’re not afraid of taking on different roles helps you stand out from other applicants.

4)    To land a brand management position, Amber recommended students show hands-on capabilities through course project work. Angie added that during interviews, she would highlight cases and projects she worked on in school and their impact.

5)    Michelle also suggested researching companies to gain a better understanding of specific departments dedicated to brand management and marketing. Read job descriptions to understand a company’s unique language. It will make searching and interviewing much easier to both the recruiter and yourself.

6)    Understand the differences between brand strategy and brand management.  Michelle explained how this depends on the life cycle of the product. Brand strategy is a long-term process that goes from initial concept to actual production; whereas brand management is the day-to-day life of the product. Rather than changing the product brand management can adapt to how it’s introduced to the market.

7)    Be creative. Angie learned during her Twitter internship experience that one must come up with innovative ideas for their client brands. Meet with your team, always do your research, and be in the know of what’s happening in the industry. 

8)    Always communicate clearly. Amber believes every conversation is an opportunity to sell yourself and your background. Always have a 30-minute elevator pitch ready. 

9)    For international students, make global background and experiences an advantage. Be open to a wide range of different opportunities and showcase language and cultural skills.

10) Michelle believes you can make an impression on your resume regardless of prior experience in brand management. In order to do so, ensure the employer understands your interest and that you’re highlighting the most relevant examples of the different things you’ve done. Take advantage of the cover letter to explain how and why you are interested in brand management and strategy and why you want to work for that specific company. Career changers should always emphasize their volunteer experiences in the field as well as leadership roles in school.

Don’t miss out on events like this! Sign up for the Wasserman Student e-newsletter By clicking here!

Starting your Job Search? Better Get Ready For Your Close-Up!

By  Nicole Tucker, Tech Recruiter at iCIMS

As a recruiter, I’m constantly reviewing resumes, phone screening candidates, and setting up interviews to find the best talent for iCIMS. With so many applicants for each position, it’s challenging to identify the soft skills needed for each unique job to ensure that the candidate is a great match for the position. On the other hand, when I’m on campus for recruitment events, students ask me “what can I do to land the job that’s right for me?” The good news is, thanks to the latest recruitment technology, there’s a tool that helps recruiters find top talent quickly and easily, and gives candidates the opportunity to stand out during their job search. It’s all in the power of video.

iCIMS and other employers have implemented video capabilities as part of their interview process. This means, candidates are given an opportunity to record a short video explaining why they are the best person for the job. Think about it, by submitting a video in addition to your resume, the recruiter will be able to see you, hear your communication style, and assess your professionalism, which can make you stand out from the crowd. With all this information regarding your candidacy, you have a much better chance of getting noticed and being invited to interview for your dream job. According to Recruiting.com, “the information retained from one minute of online video is equal to about 1.8 million written words.” In an age where the average job receives 250 resumes, having that kind of edge is crucial.

Why Video is the Answer 

It gets you in front of the recruiter — no matter how far away you are from the job. The end goal is an interview, but the logistics of scheduling 30 minute interviews for every candidate can limit your chances of making it onto the schedule. Video is your chance to use one or two minutes to persuade your future boss why you are the right person for the position.

You can “prove” your ability by simulating a real world experience. Say you want to land that big sales job, but you’ve only worked at one other company. In two minutes, you can prove what the resume doesn’t show by giving a sales pitch. Recruiters can quickly see your ability and potential.

How to Make the Perfect Video 

Dress the part – The video is your first impression to your potential employer, so treat it like an interview by wearing your professional attire.

Practice makes perfect – Your video should showcase your presentation skills, so don’t rush through the experience. Record a few versions until you feel your message is clear and you appear confident and comfortable in your video.

Keep it short and simple – Don’t experiment with special effect and graphics, unless you’re an expert. Keep the video under two minutes to keep the recruiters attention throughout its entirety.

We all get a little anxious when it comes to recording ourselves on video. It’s hard enough to pick the right LinkedIn photo — let alone record a composed, well-spoken video as part of the application process. However, the payoff can be huge — video is a great opportunity to stand out and it could give you the edge you need to land your dream job. My advice? Start preparing for your close-up now!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO MEET WITH iCIMS, STOP BY THEIR BOOTH AT THE ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY CAREER FAIR. RSVP THROUGH NYU CAREERNET BY CLICKING HERE!

Mu Sigma – Grow fast in this innovative work environment!

Author: Prashant Suryakumar

Back in 2008 when I was graduating from the UT MBA program, I had a choice to make – continue in telecom and join a Fortune 500 organization in the economic modeling team, or take a chance on a Data Analytics consulting startup. Fortunately for me my desire to try consulting gave me the confidence to get out of my comfort zone and join Mu Sigma. Boy – has it been a ride over the last 6 years! I’ve had numerous “company building” experiences, opportunities to directly interact with CXOs, manage 100+ member teams and run a $10+ million P&L, while helping the company grow 30X in revenues.

They say one in ten startups succeed, and perhaps my circumstances were different from today – So in preparation for this blog post, I decided to interview a few of my colleagues who joined Mu Sigma as part of the MSU 2013 batch.

(All fresh hires, irrespective of background are sent to our Austin office for a 6 week bootcamp conducted by the Mu Sigma University, where the basics of problem solving, advanced statistics and business are taught followed by real world consulting engagement exercises. You then go to your client location where, a combination of self-learning modules, live engagements, mentors and client interactions harden your newfound decision sciences skills.)

Here’s a synthesis of experiences they had, and you should expect if you choose to join Mu Sigma.

  • Drink out of a fire hose: Mu Sigma is a learning organization, we prioritize learning over knowing. What few people realize before joining is the breadth of learning. You will learn statistics, presentation skills, problem solving across multiple industries through first principle thinking, and extensive research. In parallel you learn how to work with clients, people management, and most importantly time management. Work will fill as much time you give it, and in the process you learn about yourself and your limits.

  • Work with a Smart Diverse crowd: Candidates are selected from the top schools in the US based on their clarity of thought and ability to learn. Expect a lot of debates!

  • Work with global teams: Ever played the game Telephone? Working with teams around the world is playing telephone in real life. Ensuring this works well requires communication through multiple channels and is an exercise in being precise in setting expectations, but broad while giving context.

  • Very high exposure / responsibility: Within 8 weeks of joining Mu Sigma, you should be expected to interact with middle management of Fortune 100 clients, providing recommendations on multimillion dollar decisions. No pressure.

  • Appreciation of failures: the training program, and most of the first year is a sandbox to learn, fail and learn again. There is significant support both in the US and from India operations to help you in your projects. All that is expected is initiative.

Mu Sigma is like a college after college. The ecosystem is young, energetic and constantly evolving. From what I have seen, there couldn’t be a better transition from university to corporate life.

If you are interested in exploring Mu Sigma some more or leaving behind a footprint in the Mu Sigma story, visit us at

http://www.mu-sigma.com/analytics/people/careers/Americas.html to learn more.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO MEET WITH Mu Sigma, STOP BY THEIR BOOTH AT THE Engineering & Technology Career FAIR. RSVP THROUGH NYU CAREERNET BY CLICKING HERE!

Profile of a Wasserman Center Internship Grant Recipient

Julie Yoon is a Steinhardt student working as a Multimedia Intern at the Clinton Foundation. As a past recipient of the Wasserman Center Internship Grant, she shares some insight into the value of applying for the Grant, and offers some tips to further your candidacy.

Best part of winning the WCIG: Because my internship was full-time, I knew that it would be difficult to secure a paying job. As we all know, living in NYC is very expensive and the Wasserman Center Internship Grant eased my overall stress and allowed me to focus on my internship.

Most challenging or rewarding part of your internship: Interning at the Clinton Foundation allowed me to continue my commitment to mission-driven media making. One of the most rewarding parts of my internship was working with people who are driven by the same mission that I firmly believe in. It motivated and inspired me everyday while I practiced my editing and visual storytelling skills.

Good advice for others applying for the WCIG: To those who are applying for the Wasserman Center Internship Grant, I would advise to form candid relationships with their mentors or supervisors. Let them know that you are passionate about your internship and that you are there to learn. This will not only show in your application but also in the supervisor’s recommendation.

Non-paying internship survival 101 tip: Live in the moment. Yes, you won’t get paid, but you will learn a lot and discover something new about yourself. Make your experience invaluable!

Are you interning this semester? Whether or not you are getting paid, take Julie’s advice on forming relationships with mentors and supervisors. If your internship is non-paying, and at a not-for-profit organization or within an industry that does not typically pay interns (arts, entertainment, media, education), apply now for the Wasserman Center Internship Grant. Apply here by Sep 30th at 11:59pm: NYU CareerNet Job ID #927342.

Student Perspectives: Interning in Council Member Margaret Chin’s office

by Jessica Chen

What made this summer the best summer? Was it my weeklong vacation in California or my weekend adventures outside of New York City? Nope; this summer was the best because of all the time I spent in my favorite city, New York. Interning in Council Member Margaret Chin’s office allowed me to explore Lower Manhattan and gained a unique experience that I would otherwise not have.

As an intern for Council Member Chin, I was able to travel between City Hall, 250 Broadway (the Legislative Office), and her District Office multiple times a day.  District One is the best; everything is within walking distance!

As an intern, I learned firsthand about the work the in City Hall as well as the district office. I really enjoyed going to City Council meetings; from listening in on conversations between the council members to hearing testimony from advocates and the general public, this internship really showed me how city government works.  One of my favorite things to do in City Hall was to be in the room during a stated meeting, which is when city bills are voted on.  Because I was in the room when a bill was passed, I felt like I was experiencing a piece of City history.

Most of my time was spent at the District Office, working under the guidance of the fulltime staff. I learned so much about the district and the city as a whole. Through working with constituents, I learned about the different problems people in the district faced, such as housing, immigration, and even education issues. Not only did I learn about these issues, I learned how to deal with them as well.

Working with constituents really helped me improve my communication skills. Watching the staff members ask questions about a case made me realize that I had to dig deeper in order to get all the facts. Sometimes when constituents would describe their case and I didn’t know how to respond, Xiaomin, Linda, Patricia and even our new staffers Vincent and Yong would fill in with an appropriate response. In moments like these I am reminded that as an intern, I have so much more to learn, and am grateful to have the opportunity to do so.

Working with constituents and on special intern projects, I’ve learned so much through firsthand experience. I know so much more about issues faced by the City’s residents as well as the policies and proposals used to address them. After working for Council Member Chin’s office this past summer I feel like more of a New Yorker than I’ve ever been.  I highly recommend interning at Council Member Chin’s office. It’s a great learning experience and has truly opened my eyes to the inner workings of city government.

Sound like a place you’d like to work? Apply for their openings on CareerNet: Job ID 942467

Student Perspectives: The 5 “Do’s” at the NYU Career Fair

Aziza Sultan is a current NYU student in a joint CAS/GSAS program. She is studying politics for her Bachelor’s degree and concentrating on political economy for her Master’s.

Do Dress the Part

When you go to a career fair, it is the beginning of a conversation that you are going to be having with a potential internship or employment opportunity. This first impression is important and it’s crucial that you put forward that you are professional. It’s imperative to take care of your appearance because you can easily prepare to look professional, to ensure that you aren’t judged on that, but rather on the rest of your package. Don’t let something you can easily control be a reason a firm you want to work for doubts you.

Do Have Copies of Your Resume Available (and a 30/60 Second Run Through Prepared)

Always have double the resumes you think you’ll need on hand. Have them out, and readily available to give to recruiters.

The nature of the career fair is that certain tables will have more of a line than others. It’s important to be able to distinguish which are the more competitive tables to navigate and which are easier to access. Ones that are easier to access will give you more ability to engage in more detailed conversation, so for those tables you can speak to the recruiter or people at that table for a longer period of time. Other tables will have more interested students. Thus, it’s important to have two types of “walk-throughs” of your resume and overall package. For shorter conversations, a 30 second presentment of yourself will do, while longer conversations can be up to around 60 seconds before a back and forth short question and answer.

Seek to Speak to Employers of Interest First

The nature of the career fair is that time is limited, so make sure that you go to tables you know you are interested in first, and save companies you want to explore for later.

Part of this strategy is going to be having done prior research on firms that will be present at the fair. A useful application to download is “NYU Career Fair Plus” on your Android or iPhone. It will have a list of all employers who are going to be at the fair. If you want to be prepared and hit the ground running, download the application and learn in depth about every single firm you’re interested in that will be present.

Do Be Yourself

Don’t try to fit into a bubble of what you expect the recruiter will like. Recruiters are people, not robots who just sort between good fits and bad fits for positions. Be confident and know that it is part of the recruiter’s goal to find smart, competent and easy to work with people to work for their firm (given that they are otherwise good fits for the position).  I’ve seen people be incredibly aggressive with recruiters to prove that they are go-getters. That’s not a good way to be, because no one wants to work with people who are abrasive as a means of showing their competence or ability to do well.

Do Only Go After Positions That are Genuinely of Interest to You

I say this because I really think people waste time and energy going after internships and employment they don’t really care to have. This is not only a waste of your own resources but of many people’s. It’s obvious to a potential employer when you are going after something only because you think it will be glamorous, pays well, or is what your friends are doing. At the end of the day, you’ll have to step into and out of an office every single day for the duration of your internship or employment. Where you work, whether you want to work there, and whether or not it’s a good fit for you will impact every part of your life – so make an educated choice. Know the firm and the work you will be doing, know yourself and seek to add the most value to both.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO ATTEND THE FALL JOB & INTERNSHIP FAIR. RSVP THROUGH NYU CAREERNET BY CLICKING HERE!

Employer Insights: What to Look for When You’re Looking

By Lisa Ganz

When I graduated from Vanderbilt in May 2013, I took a job in finance. It was a job I had basically signed on the dotted line for two years before when I was just 20 years old and received an internship offer at that company. The summer internship program was a feeder into a full-time job, and I was grateful to be gainfully employed 18 months before I was due to graduate. At the time, I remember thinking, “Wow, how could I turn this great opportunity down? What more could I ask for?”

When I found myself unhappy after a few months at that job and began actively looking for a new role, I had a much clearer understanding of what I wanted and went about my job search process in totally different way than I had a few years earlier. This time around, I was looking to jumpstart my career I wasn’t just looking for a job and looking for the following things helped me find that at AlphaSights.

1. A company that is disrupting an industry. It’s exciting to work for a company that is impacting human progress and has a unique business model that is different from any of its competitors. Every day at AlphaSights, I feel like I’m a part of something that is going to be huge, and the work I do empowers me.

2. People you want to work with. Work for a company that employs people you respect and who respect you, and one where you’ll be surrounded by people who challenge you to think. At AlphaSights, you build genuine relationships beyond just colleagues and it makes every day fun.

3. The company puts its people, not its bottom line, first. Happy employees lead to greater productivity and retention, which inadvertently leads to greater profit! So many companies I’ve worked for have lost sight of this simple fact. A paycheck can only go so far; look for a company where the leaders genuinely care about their employees’ wellbeing.

4. It fits your personality. Taking a job is a lot about fit. An employee sinking or swimming is often directly connected to whether the company is the right place for them. What is the office environment? Is it rara and collaborative, or more of an individualist mentality? Figure out what type of culture you want to be a part of.

5. You’re excited about the work. At AlphaSights, there aren’t enough hours in the day for all I need to get done, and I’m excited in the morning when I wake up to go to work. The work is stimulating and challenging. I drive my own projects and ideas, and I’m excited about what AlphaSights does at its core. We’re impacting human progress and spreading access to knowledge worldwide. Pretty cool, eh?

6. The company will help you grow professionally. Look for a company that invests in the growth of its people and gives them the skills to grow into management roles, or start their own companies. I learn something every day at AlphaSights. If I go on to do something else one day, I’m confident that I will be equipped with the skills to be successful in whatever I choose, and that’s due to AlphaSights’ investment in my growth.

7. Mobility both vertical and horizontal is promoted. Aim to work somewhere that promotes based on merit, and that encourages you to explore opportunities within the company. It’s not just about growing upwards; it’s also about growing into different roles where you can flex your skills sets.

8. Brings satisfaction. Working at AlphaSights has made both my professional and personal life fuller. We have merit bonuses and promotions; additionally, we have a quarterly awards ceremony to recognize people for different things, like being a great coach or being innovative.

It’s always motivating to reap the benefits of hard work.

9. Brings balance to life. Work should not only be challenging, but it should be fun. You want to work somewhere that respects your work life balance. At the end of the day, family and friends always come first. Life is too short to spend all your time behind a desk. Make sure your company lets you enjoy the ride too.

If the above matches what you’re looking for at your next employer, check out a career at AlphaSights! Get more info and apply to jobs by checking out the below!

Blog: blog.alphasights.com

Instagram: AlphaSightsUS

Facebook: AlphaSightsUS

Twitter: AlphaSightsUS

Website: alphasights.com/careers

Tuesday, September 16 – Seniors: Deadline to Apply to 2015 Entry Level Analyst Role

Want to meet with AlphaSights? They will be at the NYU Career Fair on Thursday, September 4th.  Make sure to check out AlphaSights and our other pt/ft employers. RSVP Today!

 

Fall Job & Internship Fair

Thursday September 4, 2014 11am – 3pm | NYU Kimmel Center
NYU students from all majors are invited to attend our largest fair of the year to explore part-time, full-time and internship opportunities. Meet with employers and learn more about both domestic and international positions.

Engineering & Technology Fall Fair

Thursday, September 18, 2014 11am – 3pm | NYU Brooklyn Campus, Jacobs Gymnasium
NYU students are invited to attend this fair to meet with a large number of employers from diverse industries. Explore full-time, part-time and internship opportunities in fields including Engineering, Computer Hardware/Software, Technology, Science, Management, and Digital Media among others.

Wasserman Graduate Student Advisory Board

Lei Lei is a second year student in the Master of Science program in Information Systems. He is also a student worker at the Wasserman Center and a member of the Wasserman Graduate Student Advisory Board.  

Lei Lei - Student in the Master of Science program in Information Systems

The Wasserman Graduate Student Career Development Team asked Lei what his favorite things are about the Wasserman Center, and here is what he said:

1. Extremely helpful career coaching (both walk-ins and appointments).

2. Close contact with employers by attending the Employer Information Sessions.

3. Free printing, free coffee, and free place to take a rest (nowhere else on campus can combine these three in one place)!

Want to learn more about the Wasserman Center resources and services for graduate students?

Attend the Graduate Student Welcome Reception at Wasserman! Thursday, August 28th from 9-10:30 am!

The NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development is located at:

133 E 13th St #2, New York, NY

Connect with graduate students from across the university and expand your NYU network at NYU Wasserman’s Graduate Student Welcome Reception! Participants will also learn about the many programs, resources and services that the Wasserman Center for Career Development offers for graduate students. Breakfast will be served. Please RSVP here.

Looking to get more involved? Join the Graduate Student Advisory Board

DEADLINE: September 15th Job ID 942466 (Graduate students only)
The Wasserman Center is in search of outstanding graduate (Master’s and PhD) student volunteers to partner directly with the Wasserman Center team to address the career goals and needs of graduate students across the university.

Tips for Wrapping Up Your Internship on a Positive Note

Nicole Klein Isenhour, Assistant Director at The Wasserman Center for Career Development at NYU-Poly, offers forth some tips for completing your internship.

You’re nearing the end of your internship so it must be time to throw caution to the wind right? WRONG…the final days, weeks, hours of your summer internship are equally as important as your first, if not more! How you leave things off will the employer will leave a lasting impression and set the stage for things moving forward. You always want to end things on a good note and have the employer remember your hard work all summer. Wrapping up the right way can lead to references, recommendations, mentorship, keeping in touch and most importantly: potential consideration for future positions down the line. Not sure what to do? No problem, that’s where we come in with the top 5 tips for wrapping up your internship.

  • Make sure your projects are covered– Finish as much as you can but in the event you are leaving before a project is finished, leave strong documentation so that your coworkers can pick up where you left off or a new person can come in and know what you have already done or what needs to be done. Your coworkers will appreciate you keeping them in the loop and leaving thorough notes.
  • Schedule a final meeting with your supervisor – Review what you have done; projects, your goals moving forward, advice they might have for you in terms of professional development. Mention what you have learned and how this experience has been valuable to you.
  • Ask for constructive feedback – Is there anything you did really well and are there areas for improvement that you could work on moving forward? A thing or two you might be able to improve upon? It shows the employer that you are mature, that you care about your growth and development and that you want to continue to improve and succeed.
  • Thank everyone– Thank your supervisor but also thank anyone else you reported to and perhaps some you did not report to but wanted to thank for the experience, such as higher ups in the company. Ask for a few minutes of their time to drop in and discuss your internship. Use this time to informationally network, share what you learned, how you grew from your time there. Ask to keep in touch in the future, after the internship concludes. Also thank your fellow interns, coworkers and any other staff that contributed to your positive experience. Appreciation goes a long way and leaves a lasting impression. Send handwritten thank you notes as well!
  • Stay connected– Send a hello email every month or 2 to the employer. See what they have been doing in the news or what is happening in the industry to use as some talking points, forward an article that might be applicable to their business and of interest to them. This shows you are invested and care about keeping up with industry trends and current events. You can also share something relevant you did in a class, a group project, a conference you attended, share it!

As always, feel free to make an appointment through CareerNet and come by the Wasserman Center for Career Development to discuss your personal internship experience and career goals/ next steps!