Category Archives: Student Perspectives

Tips From a Wasserman Center Internship Grant Winner

Achuth Krishnan Sreedevi is a graduate student at the School of Engineering, NYU. He is interning at the United Nations Department of Public Information. He is a part of the United Nations Academic Impact division which allies itself with universities across the world to promote education and research as a tool against social injustice. As a past recipient of the Wasserman Center Internship Grant, he shares some insight into the value of applying for the Grant, and offers some tips to further your candidacy.

 

What was it like working at the United Nations Academic Impact?

Every day I work with the top minds of the world along with leaders in the field of education and research towards new ways to address global issues. I recently got the opportunity to walk up and speak at the rostrum of the General Assembly. I will be chasing that high for a long time. My thoughts on international matters were appreciated to the extent that I have been featured frequently on the United Nations Academic Impact website and newsletter. This went on to find me a place as co-editor of the newsletter.  I go to sleep every night knowing that I’ve done at least the smallest share to making a positive impact on the world.  I will always be able to own up to these experiences. This has been invaluable to my future!

Why shouldn’t you shy away from a non-paying internship?

Some internships are paid and some just aren’t. This should never factor into your list of reasons for choosing an internship. The purpose of an internship is to give you a hint of what it would be like to work in that sector and to familiarize you with the organization. Do the work that you love to do. If you don’t love what you do, you cannot be successful at it because you will be competing with people who love that line of work. Choose an internship that takes you closer to where you want to be, doing what you want to do. Opportunities such as the Wasserman Centre Internship Grant are available to support you in your choices.

Why should you apply to the Wasserman Center Internship Grant?

An internship is a step towards our career and we should never sacrifice even the smallest step for a quick buck. While money should never be the reason to work, it can serve as recognition of your work and improve your life style. This means that you can be more focused on your work and less focused on your bank balance!  The Wasserman Center Internship Grant gives recognition to our work and supports us financially in our career aspirations.

What advice would you give for future applicants of the Wasserman Center Internship Grant?

If you love what you do, it will show in your passion and dedication to the organization and the quality of work you produce. Have a good relationship with your boss and show him that you are passionate about your work so that he will feel comfortable giving you a positive recommendation. Most importantly choose the right internship based on what resonates with you. The rest will follow. My best wishes to all future applicants!

Are you interning this semester? Whether or not you are getting paid, take Achuth’s advice on using your internship as an opportunity to learn more about your career interests. If your internship is non-paying, and at a not-for-profit organization or within an industry that does not typically pay interns (arts, entertainment, media, education), apply now for the Wasserman Center Internship Grant. Apply by Sep 29th at 11:59pm: NYU CareerNet Job ID #978082.

From Peer to Peer: Advice on Preparing for the Engineering and Technology Career Fair

by Mehak Hasmi

The Wasserman Engineering and Technology Career Fair at the Polytechnic School of Engineering is Thursday February 12th and I am eager to share a few tips and tricks to help you make the most of your experience at the fair and, of course, score an interview.

Aside from putting on you best professional business attire, the first thing to do before walking into the career fair is to research the companies attending and note those that you would like to visit. Wasserman has made checking out participating employers easy with the Career Fair + App. If you haven’t downloaded it already, I recommend doing so ASAP via the Apple App Store or the Google App Store. Knowing companies that will be attending gives you a leg up from others who just show up to the career fair nervous, simply seeking a job or internship. Now you don’t have to perform in-depth research on every company, but just enough to familiarize yourself with the companies that interest you. Topics that I have found beneficial to research in advance include the organizations culture, their competitors, and how their open positions might be a good fit for you. You can use this information as leverage to create a memorable conversation with a recruiter. This way when you apply, he/she will recall your name and the great conversation you initiated.

In my past four years at the School of Engineering, I have attended several career fairs as well as national conferences with NSBE (National Society of Black Engineers) and SHPE (Society of Hispanic Engineers). If I advise one thing to students who are going to a career fair, it would be to learn how to give a firm handshake and maintain eye contact when speaking with the recruiter. It says a lot about you because your first impression is pretty much your last impression.  You can have a 4.0 GPA and speak perfect English, but aside from that, your demeanor plays an important role. Recruiters want to get to know you as a person. They want to offer internships and jobs to individuals who will be able to manage teams and work well with those from diverse backgrounds. You have to be able to prove that you can work collaboratively with others and the only way you are going to do that is by putting confidence in yourself.

For me, interviews are always a nerve-wracking experience, but after a number of interviews, I have realized that perception is reality. The way you see yourself to the employer is the way you are going to present yourself to the employer. It is important to place confidence in yourself and to remember that recruiters want you to work for them just as badly as you seek to gain access to their organization. Career fairs present unique opportunities for NYU student’s to connect with employers and to get a shot at interviewing for a summer internship or full-time job. It is not always big things to remember, but little things that are key to helping you prepare for a successful experience at a NYU career fair. I wish everyone good luck at the fair!

RSVP for the Spring Engineering & Technology Career Fair on Thursday February 12th here!

Career Tips to Beat the Winter Break Blues

Unless you’re that lucky NYU student who spends winter break traversing the streets of Paris, jet skiing in the Caribbean, or even staying busy with J-term, it may just be that time of year again.  The time of year where the initial Netflix binge begins to slow, meals from the holidays are finally finishing digestion, and all your friends from home start trickling back to their respective schools, leaving you wondering what in the world you should do with your life. I digress.  Fortunately, I’ve come to find that winter break can be the perfect time to ensure that you’re set for the coming months.  Whether you’re looking for a part-time job, a spring semester/summer internship, or even full-time employment, a few hours of work amid your slew of down time can do wonders. Below you’ll find a few tips to help spice up your professional development over winter break.

1.    Update your resume.

We’ve seen it before: you’ve spent hours adding to your resume, coming up with the perfect format, describing your amazing work and contributions to companies/overall society in just one page, and you’re feeling great about yourself… until you realize that was done over a year ago. A lot’s happened since then, so get to updating!

2.    Creating/updating your LinkedIn page.

For those of you who have yet to hop on the LinkedIn train, there’s no better time than now. Set up your profile and begin making connections.  If you already have a LinkedIn account but (ahem,) haven’t given it a glance in weeks, the time has come my friend.

3.    Get organized: Make Lists.

Organize lists of companies you’re interested in, what you’re looking to get out of employment, locations you’d like to explore, application deadlines, and other general attributes to your professional future.  Making lists can provide clarity, organize to your thoughts, and help you figure out what your next steps should be as you seek employment.

4.    Consider a personal website.

Across disciplines, students and authorities alike have been creating personal websites in order to market themselves professionally. Consider this option and look into some resources for finding ways to build a personal website. (There are both free and costly options out there. Spend some time on Google or speak to a Wasserman Career Coach for more information.)

5.     Network

Reach out to people in your network and express interest in getting more experience in your respective field. You never know how far a simple question or a “hello” can go!

6.    Meet with a Wasserman Career Coach

Whether it’s in person or remotely, winter break is a great time to meet with a career coach to talk in greater detail about your goals for the coming year. By planning ahead, and taking a few moments out of your break to spice up your professional life, you can be steps ahead in the game.

These are just a few tips to help you plan for the rest of the year. If you have any specific questions, feel free to meet with a Wasserman Career Coach. View the Wasserman website for more information on winter break walk-in hours and remote meetings for those outside of NYC. But most importantly, enjoy your winter break! I’m sure there’s something new on Netflix for you to get addicted to.

Once you return from break, make sure to attend our spring career fairs! Information is below:

Spring Job & Internship Fair

Thursday January 29, 2015 11am – 3pm | NYU Kimmel Center

Take advantage of this opportunity to meet with employers hiring for summer internships and full-time positions in various industries!

Engineering & Technology Fall Fair

Thursday, February 12, 2015 11am – 3pm | NYU Brooklyn Campus, Jacobs Gymnasium

NYU Students are invited to explore full-time, part-time, and internship opportunities in a variety of fields, including engineering, computer hardware/software, technology, science, management, and digital media.

Download employer information on The Career Fair Plus app, featuring: 

  • · Complete company listing
  • · Interactive Floor Plan
  • · Event Details
  • · Announcements for real-time updates
  • · Career Fair tips section to help you prepare

Search for the NYU Career Fair Plus app on Google Play or iTunes

terri (2).jpg 

Terri Burns is a junior studying computer science in CAS. This year, Terri is on the communications team with her fellow Peer in Careers. Outside of her work with Wasserman, Terri is a Resident Assistant in Carlyle Court, a Google Student Ambassador, and heavily involved with NYC’s largest student technology organization, Tech@NYU.

 

Student Perspective: How to Stay Productive During Thanksgiving Break

By: Claudia Enriquez

Claudia Enriquez is a second year student receiving her Masters in Public Administration from NYU Wagner. She currently works as a Graduate Program Assistant at NYU Wasserman. She is a New Yorker at heart, growing up in Long Island, then moving to upstate New York to attend college, and now she’s back downstate and enjoying her time at NYU.

Before (or after) your food coma from all of the Thanksgiving goodies, take advantage of your Thanksgiving break to start your internship search! These helpful tips will give you a head start with your internship preparation.

Research and secure your Spring or Summer 2015 internship

Don’t be disheartened if you haven’t secured a spring internship yet – there is still time! Companies are still looking for interns to fill spots so do your research and search for companies that are hiring.  Check out CareerNet and other job search engines such as idealist.org and indeed.com.

Prepare for your Summer 2015 internship by researching various options. Block off time to sit down and reflect on the type of internship opportunities you’re most interested in. Do your homework, but don’t send out applications just yet. Most employers are off during the holiday and you don’t want your application getting overlooked.

Organize Your Job Search

Keep track of the companies you research and where you send off applications. It’s important to keep yourself organized to stay on top of your job search process. Create either an excel or word document template with the information below. This will really help you when you start sending out batches of applications after break.

  • Company Name – The name of the organization
  • Contact – The point of contact at the company
  • Email/Phone Number – Point of contact information
  • Application Deadline – Last day to submit your application
  • Date Applied – When you submitted your application
  • Position Title – What position you applied/are applying for
  • Application Summary – What you submitted with your application (resume, cover letter, etc.)
  • Interview – When your interview is scheduled
  • Follow-up – Whether or not you sent a thank you email or letter after the interview
  • Status – If you were rejected, offered the job, pending, etc.

Update your resume

If you haven’t updated your resume since the start of the Fall semester or prior, take advantage of your free time now to do so! Don’t wait until you find your dream job or internship to update your resume. Keep your resume up-to-date so you’re not editing at the very last minute and continue to add your experiences along the way.

Make sure your resume stands out! Have peers look over your resume and visit a Career Coach at Wasserman when you come back from break. If you’re a graduating senior, take advantage of the Resume Book Collection!

Enjoy Thanksgiving break

Lastly, enjoy your break! Spend time with family and friends, and have a great Thanksgiving!

 

 

 

 

Sources: http://jobsearch.about.com/od/findajob/ss/How-To-Organize-Your-Job-Search_2.htm#step-heading

 

Student Perspective: “What’s Next? Entrepreneurship” Panel Discussion Recap

By: Indra N. Kar

Born and raised in Connecticut, Indra N. Kar is a senior in CAS. He is pursuing a B.A. in Economics with minors in Mathematics and Chemistry. In addition to being a Peer in Career at Wasserman, he is involved on campus as the Treasurer of the Medical Dialogue Review and a member of TEDxNYU’s Finance Team.

The “What’s Next? Entrepreneurship” Panel Discussion took place on November 5, 2014 at the new Leslie eLab. It was a very informative program that was organized by Wasserman and co-sponsored by the Entrepreneurship and Innovation Association (EIA) and the NYU Entrepreneurial Institute. As a senior majoring in Economics with an interest in business, I was curious to hear what the panelists had to say regarding startups and the entrepreneurial world.

 

There were three key takeaways from the seminar:

Why to Become an Entrepreneur:

A couple of the panelists worked in the financial services industry prior to creating their own start-ups. In fact, both of them left the industry during the height of the financial crisis to find something where they could control their own destinies. Another panelist was happy to leave his cold-calling job prior to his entrepreneurial endeavors. The three of them expressed a desire to directly observe the results of their work. Whether it was finance or cold calling, they had difficulty seeing the impact they were having on people’s lives. However, by starting their own businesses, they experienced more person-to-person interactions. This allowed them to observe the ways they were affecting individuals’ lives and the influence they were having on the final product. 

Learning from Failure:

The unpredictability of a start-up’s success can lead many to shy away from starting a business. However, the speakers emphasized that failure can teach you several things including your own personal weaknesses, the business strategies that don’t work, and the fact that the best ideas are often organic ideas. 

Furthermore, the majority of the panel believed that the journey and the end result are equally important. Along the way, experience is the best teacher. You can either let past failures discourage you, or you can learn from them and move on. One of the panelists described entrepreneurship as “a state of mind,” which I think nicely captured the emotional aspect of innovation.

Qualities of a Successful Entrepreneur:

Words and phrases that repeatedly came up during the discussion were “risk taking,” “focus,” “curiosity,” and “creativity.” From the discussion, it appeared that the work of a successful entrepreneur is reflective of these four things.

The riskiness of starting your own business is inherent. You are starting something from scratch, often times without a lot of capital in the beginning. In order to secure a significant amount of funding, you need to prove yourself first. You have to find the right business partners, and sometimes, you have student debt to worry about paying off. But, how will you know success if you don’t try?

This is where the risk-taking nature and the ability to maintain focus come in handy for an entrepreneur. The panelists generally agreed that entrepreneurs need to have goals in mind and keep striving until the goals are met. Intellectual curiosity is another source of motivation that they mentioned. It helps jumpstart your creativity, which can help you think on your feet when something doesn’t go as planned. The success of a start-up is not guaranteed, but the panelists believed that the right qualities and right attitude could help you become a successful entrepreneur.

Have you attended or plan to attend one of Wasserman’s events, and would like to be featured on our blog? Let us know! Email us at career.communications@nyu.edu.

Student Perspectives: Social Media + Networking for the Job Search

by: Lauren Stewart

Lauren S. Stewart

Lauren S. Stewart  is a current 2nd year MPA in Public and Nonprofit Management and Policy candidate, with a specialization in management at NYU’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. Lauren is currently a program assistant for multicultural career programs at NYU’s Wasserman Center for Career Development and an intern at Kenneth Cole Productions in their Corporate Citizenship department. With a passion for philanthropy, corporate social responsibility, and social entrepreneurship, Lauren plans to utilize the skills learned at NYU Wagner to influence society to focus on social responsibility as a top priority within any industry. Lauren is originally from Midlothian, VA and received a B.A. in psychology from The University of Virginia.

I (heart) LinkedIn!

Moving to the big city from Virginia was quite the experience. As plans came together with starting graduate school at NYU Wagner, finding housing in Harlem, and securing a graduate program assistant role at NYU Wasserman, I believed that I was on the fast track to success. I’m sure you’re waiting for the but…

Well, I really was on the fast track to success until I sat in on NYU Wasserman’s annual Business Bootcamp. One of the speakers spoke about the importance of networking and Linkedin. Yea, I had heard of it. I thought it was just for old and established career professionals. I never understood the value in just another Facebook. Yes, I now know that Linkedin and Facebook are completely different! It’s amazing how you underestimate certain tools when you do not truly understand their purpose or their value! When I expressed to my colleagues that I didn’t have a Linkedin, their expressions ranged from shock to pity. They pretty much made me create an account that day and reiterated the opportunity it could bring.

I am now in my second year at NYU Wagner & NYU Wasserman. Linkedin was once a platform that I knew nothing about. Now it has become my favorite social network! Funny right? I enjoy making new professional connections, reading industry articles, and staying up to date with jobs openings so that I can connect friends and family to various opportunities. This semester, I received my first InMail from a recruiter. (InMail = email for Linkedin users for all you novices out there.) She viewed my profile and believed that I would be a great fit for Kenneth Cole’s Corporate Citizenship Department. I will now be an intern in the department this fall thanks to LinkedIn! 

Don’t have a LinkedIn? It’s time to get one!

Want to learn about other ways to network? Attend one of the upcoming Social Media + Networking for your Job Search seminars:

Profile of a Wasserman Center Internship Grant Recipient

Aidai Tursunbekova is a Wagner School of Public Services student interning in the United Nations Office of High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States (UN-OHRLLS). As a past recipient of the Wasserman Center Internship Grant, she shares some insight into the value of applying for the Grant, and offers some tips to further your candidacy.

Best part of winning the WCIG: The Wasserman Center Internship Grant helped me to be more focused on my internship and feel less stressed about paying my bills.

Most challenging or rewarding part of your internship: UN-OHRLLS works to promote the interests of lesser developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing states. I was on the team for landlocked developing countries, and our goal was to promote trade facilitation and infrastructure development for these countries. My main area of interest is economic development, and this internship in the UN-OHRLLS gave me an opportunity to work in that field, because trade is crucial for economic development. 

Good advice for others applying for the WCIG: I would suggest that they show their interest and passion about what they do. Additionally, they should try to build good relationships with all colleagues. It is important not only for a good internship experience, but also for networking. 

Non-paying internship survival 101 tip: Think of your internship not as a work, but  as a good opportunity to learn more about your area of interest and what you want to do after graduation. Maybe you will find what you want to do for the rest of your life, or understand that it’s simply not for you. In any case, it’s an important experience!

Are you interning this semester? Whether or not you are getting paid, take Aidai’s advice on using your internship as an opportunity to learn more about your career interests. If your internship is non-paying, and at a not-for-profit organization or within an industry that does not typically pay interns (arts, entertainment, media, education), apply now for the Wasserman Center Internship Grant. Apply by Sep 30th at 11:59pm: NYU CareerNet Job ID #927342.

Student Perspective: Wasserman Center Connecting with Graduate Students

Mai Huynh is a Master’s student in the Industrial/Organizational Psychology program at GSAS. In case you missed it, below she recaps the Graduate Student Welcome Reception at Wasserman.

This year, the Wasserman Center is making an active effort to connect with graduate students by introducing them to its resources right when they first arrive on campus. On August 28th, the Wasserman Center hosted a Graduate Student Welcome Reception filled with lots of food and information. The idea for the welcome reception came from the creative brainstorming efforts of the Wasserman Graduate Student Advisory Board, a group of student representatives doing the NYU graduate community proud by coming up with amazing ways to professionally develop students.

Over 180 graduates from GSAS, Steinhart, Nursing, School of Professional Studies, and Polytechnic School of Engineering (to name a few) participated in the event. They heard from Richard Orbe-Austin, the new Director of Graduate Student Career Development and learned about how to schedule a career coaching appointment, register for on-campus recruitment (OCR), and sign up for career seminars and events.

During the session, graduate students were given an opportunity to network with their peers and discuss the different roles they play in their life, such as graduate student, son/daughter, city-dweller, etc. The reception concluded with a guided tour of Wasserman’s facilities. Students were ecstatic to find out where they could grab some free coffee. Overall, it was a great day and fantastic way to spread the word about what Wasserman can do for graduate students.

Are you a graduate student at NYU? Take these steps to get connected with our office: 

Student Perspective: ICAP’s Summer Internship Program

I initially applied to ICAP’s summer internship program after hearing about the company from a close friend, as well as people in related industries.

My main interest was to secure a client-facing role within a financial services organization after graduation. I wanted to work for an organization that was both innovative and imparted responsibility upon young employees; both of which I had been informed was possible at ICAP. After rotating on several desks in both Global Broking and Electronic Markets during my summer internship, I was offered and accepted a role within EBS, which is an electronic foreign exchange platform. This was a Junior Account Executive role, with responsibility for an account, as well as dealing with all of the clients’ needs from a trading perspective. Typically this involves client visits to demonstrate new trading functionality on the platform, building relationships with everyone from the manual traders on the desk, to the e-commerce teams and the billing department. Essentially, anything that the client needs or has queries about, we take care of. This ensures that the role is diverse. Each day is different.

At the beginning of the graduate program we were on a 3 week training program which covered a multitude of different financial products. This training was vital in providing the breadth and depth of knowledge across asset classes; knowledge that is becoming increasingly important where electronic platforms are operating as multi-product services. Having access to the learning material via an online portal has also been a great help, particularly when wanting to brush up on products which are emerging into my daily role and products that will be more prominent in the future. Continuous training has also been provided on softer skills, which has been very helpful in managing my personal brand.

I have been very fortunate to be given a significant amount of responsibility at a very early stage. Today, 12 months after joining the graduate scheme, I now have multiple accounts that I manage across many cities including Moscow and Amsterdam, to name a few. Being able to travel to those places is one of the aspects that I enjoy the most about my role. The variety of learning about new markets, the politics that is linked to them, and the culture of each city, is a great experience which really expands your knowledge and perspective in general. Many challenges also arise when this much responsibility is given. Firstly, managing to juggle all the tasks that need to be completed as well as maintaining relationships in multiple countries at the same time is pretty difficult; especially when you’re travelling with work to Moscow, and still dealing with queries back in London. However, this is what makes the role multi-faceted and ensures greater personal development.

ICAP is a pretty unique company. Within its umbrella there are many companies where each desk / product is exciting in different ways. Having this choice is great, as the graduate recruitment team helps to match up graduates with the personalities of each desk, to ensure a good fit. I’m glad I made the choice to join ICAP’s team; my experience has been better than I could have anticipated it would be.

To find out more about ICAP, the kind of people we’re looking for, and to apply, visit www.icapcampusrecruitment.com.

Student Perspectives: Interning in Council Member Margaret Chin’s office

by Jessica Chen

What made this summer the best summer? Was it my weeklong vacation in California or my weekend adventures outside of New York City? Nope; this summer was the best because of all the time I spent in my favorite city, New York. Interning in Council Member Margaret Chin’s office allowed me to explore Lower Manhattan and gained a unique experience that I would otherwise not have.

As an intern for Council Member Chin, I was able to travel between City Hall, 250 Broadway (the Legislative Office), and her District Office multiple times a day.  District One is the best; everything is within walking distance!

As an intern, I learned firsthand about the work the in City Hall as well as the district office. I really enjoyed going to City Council meetings; from listening in on conversations between the council members to hearing testimony from advocates and the general public, this internship really showed me how city government works.  One of my favorite things to do in City Hall was to be in the room during a stated meeting, which is when city bills are voted on.  Because I was in the room when a bill was passed, I felt like I was experiencing a piece of City history.

Most of my time was spent at the District Office, working under the guidance of the fulltime staff. I learned so much about the district and the city as a whole. Through working with constituents, I learned about the different problems people in the district faced, such as housing, immigration, and even education issues. Not only did I learn about these issues, I learned how to deal with them as well.

Working with constituents really helped me improve my communication skills. Watching the staff members ask questions about a case made me realize that I had to dig deeper in order to get all the facts. Sometimes when constituents would describe their case and I didn’t know how to respond, Xiaomin, Linda, Patricia and even our new staffers Vincent and Yong would fill in with an appropriate response. In moments like these I am reminded that as an intern, I have so much more to learn, and am grateful to have the opportunity to do so.

Working with constituents and on special intern projects, I’ve learned so much through firsthand experience. I know so much more about issues faced by the City’s residents as well as the policies and proposals used to address them. After working for Council Member Chin’s office this past summer I feel like more of a New Yorker than I’ve ever been.  I highly recommend interning at Council Member Chin’s office. It’s a great learning experience and has truly opened my eyes to the inner workings of city government.

Sound like a place you’d like to work? Apply for their openings on CareerNet: Job ID 942467