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How to “Wow” Your Interviewer

Claudia Enriquez is a second year student receiving her Masters in Public Administration from NYU Wagner. She currently works as a Graduate Program Assistant at NYU Wasserman. She is a New Yorker at heart, growing up in Long Island, then moving to upstate New York to attend college, and now she’s back downstate and enjoying her time at NYU.

You landed the interview, now it’s time to bring out your A game and really ‘wow’ your interviewer. Follow these simple steps below and prepare to land that dream job/internship!

Research, Research, Research

Did I mention research? Check out the company’s website. Review the company’s mission statement, values, culture, goals, achievements, recent events, and the company’s products/services.  If you know anyone who works there – ask him/her to give you the inside scoop!

Practice Makes Perfect…Or at least Preparation!

Be prepared to the job interview. Practice general and challenging interview questions with your peers.  Practice in front of a mirror – don’t be shy! The more prepared you are, the more confident you’ll feel, which will come off during the interview.  While you should practice, be authentic during the actual interview.

NYU Wasserman has plenty of great career resources.  Swing by during walk-in hours for a mini mock interview, or make an appointment with a career counselor. You can find other helpful resources on CareerNet, under the Career Resources tab. Check it out!

Get Ready and Be on Time

The night before do the following:

  • Have your outfit picked out (rule of thumb: dress one or two levels up)

  • Pack your bag

  • Print out extra copies of your resume

  • Get directions to your destination (Check alternative routes)

  • Relax and have a good night’s sleep

The day of the big interview give yourself enough time to arrive. Arrive between 5-7 minutes early. If you’re too early walk around, grab some water, etc. As soon as you walk through the door, all eyes are on you – that means, be polite to everyone, from the receptionist to the person interviewing you.  Remember to put on your best smile!

How to Answer Questions During the Interview?

During the interview make eye contact and answer questions with confidence.  Use the STAR method:

  • Situation – Describe the situation you were in (e.g., the name of the internship or course you were taking)

  • Task – Identify the specific project you were working on and briefly discuss what it entailed

  • Action – This is the most important element! Specifically identify what YOUR action was related to the question that was asked

  • Result – Close the question by stating an outcome to your situation

If you ever find yourself stuck on a question, that’s okay! Say to the interviewer ‘that’s a good question, let me think about it.’ Pause, breathe, think, and then give your answer.

Ask Meaningful Questions

At the close of the interview, the interviewer will always ask if you have any questions for them.  Have about 5-10 questions prepared, but of course, don’t ask questions already answered during the interview.

Below are good examples of what to ask the interviewer.

  1. What qualities do you think are most important for someone to excel in this position?

  2. What do you personally like most about working for this company?

  3. What would be one of the greatest challenges a person in this position would face?

  4. Can you tell me more about the team I’ll be working with?

  5. What are the next steps in the interview process?

Follow Up

Send a thank you email or a letter to your interviewer(s) 24-48 hours after the interview. If you interviewed with more than one person, send tailored individual thank you notes. Reiterate your strengths and your interest in the company. This is also an opportunity to add anything you did not discuss during the interview. As always, thank them for their time and the opportunity.

Good luck!

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Test Prep Tips: LSAT

Hoping to become a future lawyer?

It all starts with a good test score.

To get started, click the logo below!

Unlike other admission tests, the LSAT is designed to both measure and project your ability to do well in Law School. Because of its unique format, it is essential to familiarize yourself with its format and the type of questions that will be asked.

Here are some tips to excel on the LSAT exam:

Practice everyday: Even if you are busy with school, 2 jobs and extracurricular activities, it is extremely important to practice at least one new section every day and to take an occasion quiz or practice exam.

Practice…and then analyze: When it comes to the LSAT, practice doesn’t make perfect. You must be able to understand the questions and the formatting of the exams. Spend a couple of minutes looking closely at the questions you have gotten wrong and how you could have gotten the right question.

Think critically and visualize: The LSAT tests your ability to reason and to think critically. However, don’t keep everything in your head. Draw pictures, diagrams, graphs, whatever you need to do in order to flex your logic. You must be able to understand complex hypothetical relationships between multiple objects and be able to express that relationship.

Want to put these tips to the test?

Take a free practice test with Kaplan from a location near you, or from the comfort of your home online via Kaplan’s Classroom Anywhere.

Register here to get started!

With Kaplan, not only will you get to experience a proctored exam, but you will also receive your test scores immediately and learn exclusive strategies to build your test scores.

Want more tips: Follow the Kaplan Blog here, and get articles, feed back, and advice for the LSAT.