Tag Archives: career fairs

Three Ways To Make The Most Of Your Career Fair

Murshed Chowdhury acts as an advisor to both companies and individuals who are looking for assistance in technology talent acquisition and development. He has served as the CEO & Partner of Infusive Solutions Inc. since its establishment in 2001. Prior to Infusive, he worked at several recruiting agencies where he honed his skills and rose the ranks within the organization before founding his own company.

With over 15 years of technology placement experience, Murshed has helped secure some of the most competitive technical positions for his clients at some of the world’s most prestigious firms. He holds a Bachelors Degree in Political Science from Fordham University.

Murshed is passionate about helping technologists develop themselves both professionally and technically.

Here, he shares valuable insight into achieving career fair success. Think about his tips as you prepare for the next NYU Career Fair.

Recently, our company had a table at a career fair and I noticed that many of the students had a puzzled look on their face. One student caught my attention in particular. I asked her, “What are you looking to do?” This is typical company talk at a career fair, and she responded, “I have no idea, and I really don’t know what I’m supposed to do here.” We then spent the next few minutes discussing what she majored in, but more importantly, what she liked and what interested her.  After that, we came up with a game plan where I told her to visit the various companies that were present to see if they had roles that were closely aligned to what she wanted. I told her to have some real conversations, to get representatives’ business cards and if there was interest, she should follow up. Focus on quality versus quantity, because at the end of the day, you really need one job. You hopefully get many offers, but only need to work at one company. After a few hours, she came back to our booth to tell me that she found some really good prospects, met some really good people and had some genuine conversations.  She went on to say that the career fair was not that intimidating after all, and that, actually, it was kind of fun. She said, from now on, she would make the most of her career fairs and try to use it as a vehicle to further her career.

The career fair for many first time or recurring students can be a daunting task. I remember my first one as a senior in college. You’re told to make a great impression; how exactly is unclear. You’re told to make multiple copies of your resume, dress professionally and go. That’s pretty much the advice I was given.  When I actually walked into the conference hall, I saw a lot of unfamiliar faces, got nervous and wasn’t sure what do next.

So, how do you make the most of your career fair experience? It really comes down to 3 simple steps in my opinion: have a plan, meet (network) and effectively follow up.

PLAN

Like any other successful outcomes, it all starts with proper planning. Do some research once the career services center makes available the list of companies that are visiting your institution. Then, put together a list of the companies you want to meet with and find out where they will be. Some career fairs are so large, they can have companies housed in different buildings.  Map it out and really have a game plan. If you are going with a friend, ask them to split up and see where the crowds are and then come early or stay late to meet with them. The goal is to have some quality conversations, not just say hello and give them your resume. Part of your planning should include research so you can differentiate yourself from the competition. Knowing about what a company does can go a long way in building rapport. As most people ask the quintessential, “What do you do?” question, you are unique when you can walk up to an employer and tell them you are aware of what their business does because you’ve done your homework. I can tell you for a fact, that students who took the time to research my company and me, in some cases, always got more attention from me. Their resumes went to the top of the pile. I’m sure it is no different for other employers as well.  That leads me to my next point, which is, if you have the information on who will be attending from the company, please research them. It shows two things on your part: one, that you’re serious, and two, you are willing to go above and beyond but what most people are willing to do. In today’s digital age of social media and particularly, LinkedIn, that information is readily available.

NETWORK

Next, you should allocate time to meet with as many companies as you can. If you are like most college students, and people for that matter, you’re probably familiar with the big brand companies. But don’t overlook a really great startup or fast growing company that might be perfect for you. There are amazing opportunities at some of these lesser-known brands, as well. Remember, all big brands were small at one point, you never know where this company may go. Also, they wouldn’t be at the career fair if they weren’t growing and looking for great talent like you. Speak to the representatives of these companies and find out what they do. Get their business cards…why, I’ll get to shortly. Be curious and explore, the information you find about these firms, their product and services, can help you narrow down some of your choices, and help you decide what you might be interested in doing once you graduate.

FOLLOW UP

Finally, you need to make sure you effectively follow up. For those companies you’re keen on, send a quick email thanking them for meeting with you and express your interest in the next steps of their process. A week later, follow up with a phone call and reiterate your interest in the firm and/or opportunity. Now, going back to why I asked you to collect those cards, send an email to all the people you met with, even if you’re unsure about the firm or company. Ask them to please forward your information on to anyone they feel may have an interest in your background. Remember, just because that person may not have the ideal role for you at their organization doesn’t mean they don’t have a network of contacts that can be beneficial to you. By making a good impression, and effectively following up, you will already be ahead of your fellow students. Lack of effective follow up is one of the biggest ways to pass on potential opportunities. Most people do a poor job of this. Why? I have no idea, but in any case, this can be an opportunity for you. If you start, you stand to gain. Remember, successful people don’t just focus on doing great things, they make a concentrated effort to do the small things really great, and with consistency. It’s the little things that matter. Keep doing them well and often, and the results will speak for themselves.

Make the career fairs work for you. Remember, they are there to find you, so make the how and why as easy for them as possible.

Put these newly learned skills to good use! Attend the 2014 Fall Hospitality, Tourism, and Sports Management Career Fair! RSVP HERE!

Student Perspectives: The 5 “Do’s” at the NYU Career Fair

Aziza Sultan is a current NYU student in a joint CAS/GSAS program. She is studying politics for her Bachelor’s degree and concentrating on political economy for her Master’s.

Do Dress the Part

When you go to a career fair, it is the beginning of a conversation that you are going to be having with a potential internship or employment opportunity. This first impression is important and it’s crucial that you put forward that you are professional. It’s imperative to take care of your appearance because you can easily prepare to look professional, to ensure that you aren’t judged on that, but rather on the rest of your package. Don’t let something you can easily control be a reason a firm you want to work for doubts you.

Do Have Copies of Your Resume Available (and a 30/60 Second Run Through Prepared)

Always have double the resumes you think you’ll need on hand. Have them out, and readily available to give to recruiters.

The nature of the career fair is that certain tables will have more of a line than others. It’s important to be able to distinguish which are the more competitive tables to navigate and which are easier to access. Ones that are easier to access will give you more ability to engage in more detailed conversation, so for those tables you can speak to the recruiter or people at that table for a longer period of time. Other tables will have more interested students. Thus, it’s important to have two types of “walk-throughs” of your resume and overall package. For shorter conversations, a 30 second presentment of yourself will do, while longer conversations can be up to around 60 seconds before a back and forth short question and answer.

Seek to Speak to Employers of Interest First

The nature of the career fair is that time is limited, so make sure that you go to tables you know you are interested in first, and save companies you want to explore for later.

Part of this strategy is going to be having done prior research on firms that will be present at the fair. A useful application to download is “NYU Career Fair Plus” on your Android or iPhone. It will have a list of all employers who are going to be at the fair. If you want to be prepared and hit the ground running, download the application and learn in depth about every single firm you’re interested in that will be present.

Do Be Yourself

Don’t try to fit into a bubble of what you expect the recruiter will like. Recruiters are people, not robots who just sort between good fits and bad fits for positions. Be confident and know that it is part of the recruiter’s goal to find smart, competent and easy to work with people to work for their firm (given that they are otherwise good fits for the position).  I’ve seen people be incredibly aggressive with recruiters to prove that they are go-getters. That’s not a good way to be, because no one wants to work with people who are abrasive as a means of showing their competence or ability to do well.

Do Only Go After Positions That are Genuinely of Interest to You

I say this because I really think people waste time and energy going after internships and employment they don’t really care to have. This is not only a waste of your own resources but of many people’s. It’s obvious to a potential employer when you are going after something only because you think it will be glamorous, pays well, or is what your friends are doing. At the end of the day, you’ll have to step into and out of an office every single day for the duration of your internship or employment. Where you work, whether you want to work there, and whether or not it’s a good fit for you will impact every part of your life – so make an educated choice. Know the firm and the work you will be doing, know yourself and seek to add the most value to both.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO ATTEND THE FALL JOB & INTERNSHIP FAIR. RSVP THROUGH NYU CAREERNET BY CLICKING HERE!

Student Perspectives: 10-week Internship Experience at AllianceBernstein

From the 10-Week Summer Internship…

My first experience of AllianceBernstein began with the 10-week Internship program during the summer after my junior year. From SQL training to advanced market knowledge, I was able to absorb so much with the support of my mentor and other team members. I was able to ask questions to any managers within or outside my team in accordance with AB’s open-minded culture, without which I would have not been able to manage my projects that required proficiency in programming language as a finance major. 10 weeks was sufficient for me to decide that this is the place where people truly foster each other’s growth as a firm, in accordance with its “Culture of Relentless Ingenuity”.

To Being Part of the Rotational Associate Program

Heading into my third month at AllianceBernstein as an Associate under Investment Management track, my opinion of AB remains unchanged. I can proudly say that this firm has so much to offer for anyone who wishes to get a head start on his/her professional career. The Rotational Program is a great advantage for college graduates to get the taste of different businesses in depth while being part of significant projects for each rotation. For myself, my first rotation has been with the BenOwn team under Security Reference Management. From the very first day, I was included into every part of my team’s project list—from its daily task to an on-going vendor contract project. I was even pulled into a Legal team’s daily project list to conduct Fair Allocation Tests and Front-Running Tests as my team interacts closely with the Legal and Compliance team for financial reporting purposes to the S.E.C. I am looking forward to be exposed to even broader parts of the firm to gain fuller experience of AB and the Asset Management industry.

Besides the rigorously structured rotational program, AllianceBernstein actively fosters its employees’ growth through various types of trainings and networking opportunities. These training sessions and networking events further enhance the AB’s culture of “Relentless Ingenuity” by creating a more team-oriented and better inter-department network that ultimately encourage sharing of ideas and effective communication.

Examples of such training/networking events include “Honing Your Professional Presence” series presented by AB’s Head of Human Resources, Speaker Series events presented by different Department Heads, Firm-wide Receptions for the Associates and Interns, as well as AB’s departmental Career Center and e-Learning platforms that provide constant training opportunities for the employees. Certain events, such as the Comedy Workshop and Explore AB, are specially designed by the Technology and Operations team for its Associates to enable them to build better network across the firm to be part of AB’s inclusive culture.

Activities and Additional Perks of Being Part of AllianceBernstein

Employee Resource Groups are another important component of AB’s culture. From AB Runner’s club to AB enERGy team that advocates to go-green movement, employees are encouraged to pursue their interests outside work while being part of AB. Other groups include AB Asians, AB Volunteers group, and LGBT club. Each club hosts their own series of events of various nature, which ranges from wine tasting events to book discussions.

Delicious food options are another important perk offered for the AB employees. With on12 cafeteria that serves breakfast and lunch composed of different cuisines and pantries on each floor filled with free beverages, AB ensures that its employees are well-fed and energized to perform at their best.

Conclusive Remarks

If you are an individual who is looking to be part of a firm that genuinely cares about its employee’s professional growth, AllianceBernstein is the place to be. Under the environment that fosters a “Culture of Relentless Ingenuity”, you are guaranteed with guidance to develop your professional presence on a solid ground with constant mentorship and experience the firm as well as the industry from variety of perspectives. Investing in your future at a right place is undoubtedly an important task, and the rotational program allows you to explore without taking the risk of being stuck with a wrong choice. So what’s there to hesitate?

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO MEET WITH AllianceBernstein, STOP BY THEIR BOOTH AT THE FALL JOB & INTERNSHIP FAIR. RSVP THROUGH NYU CAREERNET BY CLICKING HERE!

 

Employer Insights: BrightEdge’s Top 10 Career Tips for Optimizing Career Fair Success

Brought to you by: 

                      Student
@BrightEdge
                            OnCampus

BrightEdge is a fun, young, talented, and driven organization that is the global leader for Enterprise SEO technology.  We have cool snacks, a fridge named Frank the Tank that is full of drinks, and we throw amazing parties.

#10 – Research! Research! Research!

Before showing up to one, research the career fair’s website and career center job postings to understand which companies are attending and the jobs available (and relevant!) to you.  You can impress a representative by knowing about his or her company.  Yes, this actually means more than restating the mission statement, but knowing about industry trends, top competitors, and growth areas.  Also leverage your professors and alumni network to get tips, advice, and connections for companies that may interest you.  Be prepared to answer questions such as “Why do you want to work for us?” or “What type of career interests you the most?” The more you know about each company, the better prepared you will be to converse with the company representative.

#9 – Take Plenty of Resumes

Though it might make you feel like the over eager kid who sits in the front row and asks a million questions per class, coming to a career fair prepared is important.  Take a minimum of 25 resumes (or more if it’s a large event) to hand out to prospective employers.  If you have resumes with different interests or job objectives, make sure you bring enough of each version.  Don’t rely on copy services being available at the fair. Also, bring an iPad, smartphone, or a notepad to take notes, and organize everything in a briefcase or portfolio – looking professional is just as important as being professional.  Well, at least almost as important…

#8 – Prepare a Plan

Just as a lioness circles a lone wildebeest who has broken away from the herd, so too should you prepare a strategy that outlines a plan of attack. Arrive early to register and familiarize yourself with the location.  Obtain a map of the employer booths (if available), determine where your top and second choices are located, and list them in priority order to visit.  A good recommendation is to return to your top choices towards the end and thank them again for their time.  Be aware of time demands and try not to monopolize anyone’s time – showing interest is key, being overzealous is not. Ask specific questions and offer to follow up after the fair, as appropriate. Stay flexible and use time wisely to avoid long lines and make sure you meet with your top choices.

#7 – Broaden Your Focus

When researching to identify employers and career opportunities, think outside the box and include many types of employers.  Remember that while certain companies might seem attractive to you like a movie star or hip hop mogul, it’s often the newcomer or undiscovered gem that can offer just as meaningful career opportunities.  For instance, you may have not considered working for a technology start up (hint-hint), but technology companies recruit and hire professionals in many different fields outside of engineering (e.g., sales, client services, marketing, finance, or accounting). 

#6 Be Ready for a ‘Mini’ Interview

Employers will treat the career fair as an opportunity to do a 2 to 3 minute interview with prospective candidates to quickly identify potential next steps, so make sure to sell yourself!  Be direct. Introduce yourself, including your name, career interests, and why you are interested in their company. Be prepared to quickly sell your skills, talents, and experience.  Career fairs tend to be more casual, so you can relax and be less formal in your approach – though we don’t recommend calling your recruiter “bro”….

#5 Be Memorable

Employers will talk to a number of candidates while at the career fair, so make sure you stand out from the crowd and make a good 1st impression.  Show a lot of personality and energy, and remember that you won’t get a 2nd chance to make your 1st impression. Candidates often tend to get nervous and forget that it’s also about showing who you are and as well as selling yourself.  While your GPA and internships are obviously a good gauge of your stellar qualifications, fitting into team “culture” is just as important, so make sure to highlight who you really are.  But don’t be afraid to add some flair to your prepared ‘elevator speech.’  The representatives at the career fair will be taking notes on you, so make sure to bring you’re A-game!

#4. Keep Track of the Companies

Track which employers you’ve submitted your resume to so you know which ones to follow up with.  It’s a good idea to jot down notes on whom you meet, reminders of key experiences, skills, or areas discussed, and the necessary steps for follow up.  This will help later on when following up and preparing for any interviews.  There’s nothing worse than getting a call for an interview and having to ask them what it’s for… Taking notes will also help you when you write a follow up “thank you” email, which of course you will do since you’re not a Neanderthal. 

#3. Ask About Next Steps & Follow Up

When wrapping up your conversations with each representative, show your interest and enthusiasm by asking about next steps; including submitting an online application, the recruiting process, and timeline.  Most companies also require an online application even though you may have submitted a resume at the career fair.  If the company says they will contact you, refrain from emailing or calling, and wait for them to reach out to you first. 

#2 Network! Network! Network!

Did we mention networking?  Career fairs are all about networking and building relationships.  Your main task is to network with the recruiters and hiring managers at the career fair, but also network with your fellow job-seekers in terms of sharing information about companies, job opportunities, contacts, and helpful hints.  While it might be tempting to view them as the competition and jostle for position in front or even misdirect them to the exit, remember that you might actually get further in life by working as a team. 

#1 Don’t Forget About the Intangibles

Prepare while waiting – don’t just stand in line doing nothing! Read the company materials, as someone actually spent a fair amount of time trying to elucidate the company’s goals and needs.  Also listen to the other conversations going on around to better prepare for your time.  This is an ideal time to put your eavesdropping skills to work, as long as you’re not too obvious.  Be patient – don’t be disappointed if the representative needs to take a break before your conversation. Stay positive – if your ideal company is not actively hiring for the position you want, take this as an opportunity to network and build relationships.  Meet with the representatives to learn about the future opportunities and a potential timeline.

Honorable Mention – Visit the BrightEdge Booth at the Career Fair

BrightEdge is a fun, young, talented, and driven organization that is the global leader for Enterprise SEO technology.  We have cool snacks, a fridge named Frank the Tank that is full of drinks, and we throw amazing parties.

ABOUT BRIGHTEDGE:

BrightEdge is an enterprise Search Engine optimization (SEO) technology platform, which helps the world’s largest brands stay ahead in the rapidly evolving internet landscape. BrightEdge is leading a fundamental shift in digital marketing by harnessing big data analytics to help businesses optimize their online content and drive revenue from web sites, search engines, and social networks across the globe.

If you would like to meet with BrightEdge, stop by their booth at the Fall Job & Internship Fair. RSVP through NYU CareerNet by clicking here!

 

In Case You Missed It: Day In The Life at Rauxa

Did you miss Kim sharing what her day is like at Rauxa! If so, click on the image below for a recap.

Sound like a place you’d like to intern? Make sure to stop by their table at the NYU Fall Job & Internship Fair on September 4th!

Employer Insights: What to Look for When You’re Looking

By Lisa Ganz

When I graduated from Vanderbilt in May 2013, I took a job in finance. It was a job I had basically signed on the dotted line for two years before when I was just 20 years old and received an internship offer at that company. The summer internship program was a feeder into a full-time job, and I was grateful to be gainfully employed 18 months before I was due to graduate. At the time, I remember thinking, “Wow, how could I turn this great opportunity down? What more could I ask for?”

When I found myself unhappy after a few months at that job and began actively looking for a new role, I had a much clearer understanding of what I wanted and went about my job search process in totally different way than I had a few years earlier. This time around, I was looking to jumpstart my career I wasn’t just looking for a job and looking for the following things helped me find that at AlphaSights.

1. A company that is disrupting an industry. It’s exciting to work for a company that is impacting human progress and has a unique business model that is different from any of its competitors. Every day at AlphaSights, I feel like I’m a part of something that is going to be huge, and the work I do empowers me.

2. People you want to work with. Work for a company that employs people you respect and who respect you, and one where you’ll be surrounded by people who challenge you to think. At AlphaSights, you build genuine relationships beyond just colleagues and it makes every day fun.

3. The company puts its people, not its bottom line, first. Happy employees lead to greater productivity and retention, which inadvertently leads to greater profit! So many companies I’ve worked for have lost sight of this simple fact. A paycheck can only go so far; look for a company where the leaders genuinely care about their employees’ wellbeing.

4. It fits your personality. Taking a job is a lot about fit. An employee sinking or swimming is often directly connected to whether the company is the right place for them. What is the office environment? Is it rara and collaborative, or more of an individualist mentality? Figure out what type of culture you want to be a part of.

5. You’re excited about the work. At AlphaSights, there aren’t enough hours in the day for all I need to get done, and I’m excited in the morning when I wake up to go to work. The work is stimulating and challenging. I drive my own projects and ideas, and I’m excited about what AlphaSights does at its core. We’re impacting human progress and spreading access to knowledge worldwide. Pretty cool, eh?

6. The company will help you grow professionally. Look for a company that invests in the growth of its people and gives them the skills to grow into management roles, or start their own companies. I learn something every day at AlphaSights. If I go on to do something else one day, I’m confident that I will be equipped with the skills to be successful in whatever I choose, and that’s due to AlphaSights’ investment in my growth.

7. Mobility both vertical and horizontal is promoted. Aim to work somewhere that promotes based on merit, and that encourages you to explore opportunities within the company. It’s not just about growing upwards; it’s also about growing into different roles where you can flex your skills sets.

8. Brings satisfaction. Working at AlphaSights has made both my professional and personal life fuller. We have merit bonuses and promotions; additionally, we have a quarterly awards ceremony to recognize people for different things, like being a great coach or being innovative.

It’s always motivating to reap the benefits of hard work.

9. Brings balance to life. Work should not only be challenging, but it should be fun. You want to work somewhere that respects your work life balance. At the end of the day, family and friends always come first. Life is too short to spend all your time behind a desk. Make sure your company lets you enjoy the ride too.

If the above matches what you’re looking for at your next employer, check out a career at AlphaSights! Get more info and apply to jobs by checking out the below!

Blog: blog.alphasights.com

Instagram: AlphaSightsUS

Facebook: AlphaSightsUS

Twitter: AlphaSightsUS

Website: alphasights.com/careers

Tuesday, September 16 – Seniors: Deadline to Apply to 2015 Entry Level Analyst Role

Want to meet with AlphaSights? They will be at the NYU Career Fair on Thursday, September 4th.  Make sure to check out AlphaSights and our other pt/ft employers. RSVP Today!

 

Fall Job & Internship Fair

Thursday September 4, 2014 11am – 3pm | NYU Kimmel Center
NYU students from all majors are invited to attend our largest fair of the year to explore part-time, full-time and internship opportunities. Meet with employers and learn more about both domestic and international positions.

Engineering & Technology Fall Fair

Thursday, September 18, 2014 11am – 3pm | NYU Brooklyn Campus, Jacobs Gymnasium
NYU students are invited to attend this fair to meet with a large number of employers from diverse industries. Explore full-time, part-time and internship opportunities in fields including Engineering, Computer Hardware/Software, Technology, Science, Management, and Digital Media among others.

Summer Spotlight Series with Opportunity Finance Network

Recently, Caroline Deng, Stern ’17, shared her day working with @OppFinance. Click the logo below for a recap.

Keep tuning into our blog throughout the next few months for more spotlights on summer jobs and internships.

Three Ways To Make The Most Of Your Career Fair

Murshed Chowdhury acts as an advisor to both companies and individuals who are looking for assistance in technology talent acquisition and development. He has served as the CEO & Partner of Infusive Solutions Inc. since its establishment in 2001. Prior to Infusive, he worked at several recruiting agencies where he honed his skills and rose the ranks within the organization before founding his own company.

With over 15 years of technology placement experience, Murshed has helped secure some of the most competitive technical positions for his clients at some of the world’s most prestigious firms. He holds a Bachelors Degree in Political Science from Fordham University.

Murshed is passionate about helping technologists develop themselves both professionally and technically.

Here, he shares valuable insight into achieving career fair success. Think about his tips as you prepare for the NYU Career Fair next fall.

Recently, our company had a table at a career fair and I noticed that many of the students had a puzzled look on their face. One student caught my attention in particular. I asked her, “What are you looking to do?” This is typical company talk at a career fair, and she responded, “I have no idea, and I really don’t know what I’m supposed to do here.” We then spent the next few minutes discussing what she majored in, but more importantly, what she liked and what interested her.  After that, we came up with a game plan where I told her to visit the various companies that were present to see if they had roles that were closely aligned to what she wanted. I told her to have some real conversations, to get representatives’ business cards and if there was interest, she should follow up. Focus on quality versus quantity, because at the end of the day, you really need one job. You hopefully get many offers, but only need to work at one company. After a few hours, she came back to our booth to tell me that she found some really good prospects, met some really good people and had some genuine conversations.  She went on to say that the career fair was not that intimidating after all, and that, actually, it was kind of fun. She said, from now on, she would make the most of her career fairs and try to use it as a vehicle to further her career.

The career fair for many first time or recurring students can be a daunting task. I remember my first one as a senior in college. You’re told to make a great impression; how exactly is unclear. You’re told to make multiple copies of your resume, dress professionally and go. That’s pretty much the advice I was given.  When I actually walked into the conference hall, I saw a lot of unfamiliar faces, got nervous and wasn’t sure what do next.

So, how do you make the most of your career fair experience? It really comes down to 3 simple steps in my opinion: have a plan, meet (network) and effectively follow up.

PLAN

Like any other successful outcomes, it all starts with proper planning. Do some research once the career services center makes available the list of companies that are visiting your institution. Then, put together a list of the companies you want to meet with and find out where they will be. Some career fairs are so large, they can have companies housed in different buildings.  Map it out and really have a game plan. If you are going with a friend, ask them to split up and see where the crowds are and then come early or stay late to meet with them. The goal is to have some quality conversations, not just say hello and give them your resume. Part of your planning should include research so you can differentiate yourself from the competition. Knowing about what a company does can go a long way in building rapport. As most people ask the quintessential, “What do you do?” question, you are unique when you can walk up to an employer and tell them you are aware of what their business does because you’ve done your homework. I can tell you for a fact, that students who took the time to research my company and me, in some cases, always got more attention from me. Their resumes went to the top of the pile. I’m sure it is no different for other employers as well.  That leads me to my next point, which is, if you have the information on who will be attending from the company, please research them. It shows two things on your part: one, that you’re serious, and two, you are willing to go above and beyond but what most people are willing to do. In today’s digital age of social media and particularly, LinkedIn, that information is readily available.

NETWORK

Next, you should allocate time to meet with as many companies as you can. If you are like most college students, and people for that matter, you’re probably familiar with the big brand companies. But don’t overlook a really great startup or fast growing company that might be perfect for you. There are amazing opportunities at some of these lesser-known brands, as well. Remember, all big brands were small at one point, you never know where this company may go. Also, they wouldn’t be at the career fair if they weren’t growing and looking for great talent like you. Speak to the representatives of these companies and find out what they do. Get their business cards…why, I’ll get to shortly. Be curious and explore, the information you find about these firms, their product and services, can help you narrow down some of your choices, and help you decide what you might be interested in doing once you graduate.

FOLLOW UP

Finally, you need to make sure you effectively follow up. For those companies you’re keen on, send a quick email thanking them for meeting with you and express your interest in the next steps of their process. A week later, follow up with a phone call and reiterate your interest in the firm and/or opportunity. Now, going back to why I asked you to collect those cards, send an email to all the people you met with, even if you’re unsure about the firm or company. Ask them to please forward your information on to anyone they feel may have an interest in your background. Remember, just because that person may not have the ideal role for you at their organization doesn’t mean they don’t have a network of contacts that can be beneficial to you. By making a good impression, and effectively following up, you will already be ahead of your fellow students. Lack of effective follow up is one of the biggest ways to pass on potential opportunities. Most people do a poor job of this. Why? I have no idea, but in any case, this can be an opportunity for you. If you start, you stand to gain. Remember, successful people don’t just focus on doing great things, they make a concentrated effort to do the small things really great, and with consistency. It’s the little things that matter. Keep doing them well and often, and the results will speak for themselves.

Make the career fairs work for you. Remember, they are there to find you, so make the how and why as easy for them as possible.

Sports and Entertainment Panel Recap

Michelle Tran, Steinhardt MCC 2017, talks about the Sports and Entertainment panel.

On Thursday Feb. 6th, the NYU Wasserman Center at SCPS, hosted a panel of professionals who are currently in the sports media and entertainment industry.  From golf, to baseball, and even Tough Mudder, the panelists provided expert insight about the sports media industry itself, the qualities of a best entry-level candidate, and day in the life experiences on the job.  Here are the 5 main tips that the 6 panelists shared:

1) Networking

There can never be too much networking.  All panelists agreed that the number one way to further your career is through networking.  Dan Asip, Manager of Service & Retention at MSG, explains how networking can determine your chances of moving up from an internship status to obtaining that full-time job position available in another department.  In order to be able to secure a job, you have to talk to the right people and build relationships with others who can support you when the time comes for interviews.  Go beyond just talking to people within your office.  Expand your horizons and expand your network of people to best serve your career.  Asip and the other panelists agree, creating relationships with your colleagues goes a long way.

2) The glamorous life doesn’t come cheap

The idea of working in the sports media and entertainment industry has a certain sexy and glamorous appeal to young and eager students.  A life being surrounded by sports legends, big-name executives, and star athletes appears to be the dream job.  But the journey to the glam and glitz is no easy task.  Leign Ann Minutoli, Assistant Brand Manager at the Topps Company puts it plainly: “Expect to be poor when you first start off.”  No career starts off easy or the way one dreamed it to be.  Adam Suritz, Tough Mudder recruiter, can attest to this reality as he himself started off as an employee in the Apple Human and Resources Department entering in employee work times.  Don’t expect to get the dream job right out of college.  Jillian Wright, Director of Corporate Sponsorship at the Staten Island Yankees, gives the example of moving to Staten Island for the job, and says you have to be willing to relocate.  Ultimately, don’t lose faith in your career.  Be able to adapt, improvise, and overcome obstacles one way or another.

3) Be open to working in different sectors of the industry

In order to thrive in this industry, all panelists agree that one must have an open-mind in applying.  Don’t confine yourself to just one sector of the industry.  You may want to work in the social media department, but do not confine your application to just this one branch of the company.  Along with applying to this social media position, maybe decide to apply to the communications department or the marketing department or even the fan development department.  The point is to go into the application process with an open mind in order to show versatility and willingness to try something new.  Who knows, maybe your interests can shift to a different department you never thought plausible just by simply trying it out.

4) You don’t have to be an avid sports fan

                 Just because you go into the sports media and entertainment industry, doesn’t mean you have to be an avid sports fan.  All panelists work with colleagues in their respective companies that have a variety of backgrounds that may not be revolved around sports.  Vanessa Bekono, from GroupM ESP, mentioned that in their company career changers with a background in a different industry and experience working with clients are an asset, and you can learn the entertainment and media business on the job.  All these recruiters are looking for in a candidate are work ethic.  Knowing the entire roster of the New York Rangers and freaking out when meeting client-athletes will more likely decrease your chances of being hired versus acting in a civil and professional manner within the office environment.  For Scott Lipsky, manager of digital media at US Golf Association, some background knowledge of the sport is helpful but in the end, it comes down to whether or not you can get the work done and finish the projects that are given to you.  You prove your abilities not by acting like a mad-raving fan, but by the work you successfully accomplish.

5) You are interviewing the job, as much as the job is interviewing you

In the interview process, it is not just about showing up to the interview, answering the questions, handing in your resume, and walking out.  Minutoli and Suritz agree

Engineering & Technology Career Fair Tips from Alliant Technologies, LLC

Jay Brennan, Vice President Human Resources at Alliant Technologies, LLC offers forth some tips and advice in preparation for Thursday’s Engineering & Technology Career Fair at NYU-Poly. Don’t forget to stop by! The event runs from 11:00am-3:00pm.

The NYU Spring Engineering & Technology Career Fair is a great way for you to make initial contacts with prospective employers. You can use this opportunity to meet people who work for the company and ask questions.  It is important to make a great first impression and, hopefully, open the door to further interviews.  While this is always important, it is even more important at a career fair, because you only get a few minutes with the prospective employer to impress them.

First and foremost, a career fair is a professional recruiting event.  Dress appropriately.  While a business suit is not necessary, your outfit should still be clean, pressed and neat.  Looking like you’ve just hit the gym or rolled out of bed will not help.

Next, your resume is your calling card.  It should be neat with no typos, and accurately represent your skills and experience.  We look for resumes that list actual accomplishments, so when listing jobs, internships and projects, make sure you highlighted what your role was and how your contributions helped make your task or project successful.

It is also important to know something about the employers you want to meet. Your career office normally provides you with a booklet or website that lists all the employers attending.  Do your homework and learn something about the company.  Check out their website.  If we’ve been to your school before, we may have hired people you know.  Ask around among your friends and peers.

Prepare some questions you want to ask prospective employers.  We are always looking for thoughtful, intelligent people who come prepared, and asking thoughtful, intelligent, well-prepared questions is a great way to demonstrate this.

Lastly, make sure you have a good time at the career fair.  We want to hire people who are pleasant and fun to work with, so smile and look people in the eye. Relax and be yourself.

Please stop by the Alliant Technologies table and say hello.