Tag Archives: career resources

Summer Spotlight Series with Opportunity Finance Network

Recently, Caroline Deng, Stern ’17, shared her day working with @OppFinance. Click the logo below for a recap.

Keep tuning into our blog throughout the next few months for more spotlights on summer jobs and internships.

Four Influential Fashion Figures and the Career Lessons They Can Inspire In Us

This summer here at Wasserman, we want to help give some insight into particular career fields that you may not have previously considered. Here, Sydney Mai, MCC ’17, offers forth some thoughts about fashion icons and shows how they can inspire.

What do you think of when hearing the word “fashion”? Is it the latest clothes, catwalks, runway models, after-parties, magazine covers, or the Paris Fashion Week? Truth is, the fashion world is not all just centered around the glitz and glam that appears on the surface. It’s about the road to making it there and the people who once traveled that road – fashion figures with inspiring stories that have turned into valuable career lessons for us.

  1. Coco Chanel – “A girl should be two things: classy and fabulous”

Whether it is Chanel no.5, the little black dress, or her witty words of wisdom, Mademoiselle Chanel sure knew how to do things in style. Coco Chanel’s legacy travels far beyond her century-old fashion empire: she is a legend, a trailblazer, a vision of elegance and sophistication, and most importantly, an inspiration to millions of women all around the world. Coming from humble beginnings, Coco Chanel spent most of her teenage years inside the constricting walls of a convent where she learned needlework from the nuns. Yet, talents like to break free – her nunnery daily wear was soon transformed into ageless jet-set designs, ones that helped establish her iconic personal brand.

Lesson to learn: Whatever you do in life, do it with style! Build your own personal brand with an unforgettable trademark. Don’t be afraid to break boundaries and explore your potentials!

2. Tyra Banks: “A smart model is a good one”

Think modeling is all about posing for the camera? Miss Banks will prove you wrong. Tyra Banks revolutionized people’s common trivialization of a career in the modeling industry with her versatility and creativity: she takes on the role of a TV personality, actress, producer, writer, businesswoman, and philanthropist. Despite the phenomenal success of America’s Next Top Model, hardly does one know that the show concept was first poked fun at when being introduced to CW, for the producers didn’t take models seriously. Top Model now appears in over 35 countries and its creator, Miss Banks, continues to show the world her aptitude with a certificate from Harvard’s Management Extension Program, earned in 2011.

Lesson to learn: Versatility is what every employer looks for. An ability to take on and fit into any role proves that you’re the next top candidate. Why stick to one role or conform to stereotypes? The world is your oyster!

3.Ralph Lauren: “I don’t design clothes. I design dreams.”

Ralph Lauren’s rags-to-riches story has long motivated generations and generations of aspiring young fashion designers who dream of making it in the business. Born and raised in the Bronx to a Jewish immigrant family in the 50s, Lauren knew what it was like to have little and to dream big. As a teenager, he spent hours in movie theaters immersing himself in the magical world of films, dreaming of a better life. Childhood fantasies were soon turned into actions as the creative world moved to New York City in 1960s, determined to make it big.

Lesson to learn: “The creative adult is the child who has survived” (Le Guin). It doesn’t matter where you come from, it’s OK to dream big and even to have larger-than-life ambitions. The secret lies in transforming your ambitions into plans then into actions. It’s up to you to make things happen.

4. Anna Wintour: “Fashion’s not about looking back. It’s always about looking forward.”

With Anna Wintour, it is always “on to the next,” as Chanel creative director Karl Lagerfeld puts it. Fear her or worship her, Anna Wintour is indisputably the most powerful woman in the fashion industry today. Over two decades spearheading the Vogue America team, how does she keep this 300-billion-dollar enterprise up and running? People who’ve had the privilege of being on Anna’s team are wowed by her decisiveness. Trusting her gut is indeed the key to her success.

Lesson to learn: Know your goals. Be decisive and listen to your heart.

These are the people who have day by day, bit by bit, inspired me to realize my dream of working in fashion marketing & advertising. Their career lessons, however, are applicable regardless of any industry or discipline you’ve chosen to go into. Good luck with your endeavors wherever they may take you!

 

The Job Search for Seasoned Professionals

Date/Time: Thursday, July 10th, 2014 | 6-7:30 PM

Location: Wasserman Center for Career Development, Presentation Room B

Thinking about changing jobs?  Getting back into the labor market and don’t know where to start? If you feel like you have great skills at your job, but not at job search, then we have the workshop for you. Join Steven Greenberg, CBS radio anchor of “Your Next Job” and expert on job search, who will discuss a new approach to getting hired in today’s competitive market.    The talk will focus on experienced jobseekers, who often face additional obstacles.   Steven will discuss how to combat the hidden bias against older candidates and offer concrete tools and strategies for enhancing your job search. There are new rules for success in today’s labor market, and Steven will help you develop a successful job search strategy.

Speaker Details:

Steven Greenberg is the creator and anchor of the CBS Radio news program “Your Next Job”.  His features air 15 times each week on WCBS 880 in New York, and on other CBS radio news stations. He has written popular articles about job search for Forbes.com and CNN Money.com,  and his job board for jobseekers over 40 has been profiled on NPR’s All Things Considered.   He is also the founder of a recruiting firm and a temp agency.   He was general counsel and HR manager for one of the most successful toy manufacturers in the US.  He is an attorney who practiced at two highly prominent law firms in NY – Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft  and Chadbourne Parke. He lives in Westport, CT with his wife and four sons.

To RSVP:

For degreed NYU alumni and current students, please register through your NYU CareerNet account (click on the menu tab Events, then Seminars) to reserve a seat. If you do not have an account, please contact our reception desk at: 212.998.4730. Space is limited.

Asking for Advice, Not a Job: How to Conduct Informational Interviews

Megan Yasenchak is a current graduate student at NYU School of Continuing and Professional Studies, pursuing a Masters in Global Affairs.  She attended the NYU Wasserman Center@SCPS career event, entitled, “Asking for Advice, Not a Job: How to Conduct Informational Interviews” which was presented by Rachel Frint, Associate Director, NYU Wasserman Center at SCPS.  In competitive job markets, informational interviews are a key resource to assist job seekers by expanding and cultivating their career networks.

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What is Informational Interviewing?

Informational interviewing is a form of networking with experts from your field or a related industry. It is a personal meeting, one-on-one, where you are leading the conversation with that person by asking them for advice, insight and guidance in developing your career path. In these meetings, you ask questions about their own career experiences and their organizations as well. This process allows you to make a positive impression on an expert outside of the confines of a traditional job interview.

Why is Informational Interviewing important?

Informational interviewing is asking for resources, not asking for a job. However, informational interviewing may connect you to job opportunities. Frequently, employers do not post all of their vacancies through public announcements. These un-posted vacancies are referred to as the “hidden job market,” which accounts for nearly 70% of job opportunities.

Through informational interviewing, a job seeker leaves an impression with that industry expert. You are investing your time in building a relationship with the expert that can lead to, potentially, other future industry contacts. This networking could result in job opportunities.

How To Identify Potential Contacts

Everyone is a potential contact. There are “strong” connections, such as family and friends and “weak” connections, like classmates, former co-workers or new acquaintances at events. Use your personal network, professional associations, social media and the Wasserman Center to expand your connections!

How To Initiate an Informational Interview

First, identify who you are (i.e. your brand), what do you want to communicate, what are your goals and how you can maintain this relationship.

When requesting an informational interview, be clear and direct in your request. Introduce yourself and explain any connection, why you would like to meet and how you would like to connect (e.g. telephone, in person, video chat).

How to Conduct the Informational Interview

Your informational interview is to gain insight from an industry expert. Be prepared for the meeting by thinking of topics of conversation, conducting research on that person and/or organization and think of questions. Informational interviewing is your chance to gain critical insight into your career field from experts!

After the Informational Interview

Your goal is to maintain this relationship and build connections, especially after the meeting. Remember to send a quick thank you note (within 24 hours). Maintain the relationship by sending your contact an update on your professional life (every 1-3 months).

 Maintaining so many current and future contacts may seem daunting; so divide your connections into a manageable list. Meet with new one person every week. Try to schedule one informational interview every month. Reconnect with one former contact every week.

To develop your own career strategies for building a network, schedule an appointment with a NYU Wasserman Center Career Coach through NYU CareerNet

5 Reasons Why Social Media Prep Should Be Part of Your Job Search Strategy

The fine folks from Social Assurity are back this summer with some important tips on social media prep and strategy.

NYU students should set aside some time this summer to begin prepping and optimizing their social media profiles across social networks. By creating a content rich social media presence reflecting your skills, activities, interests and accomplishments, you will be enhancing your ability to secure choice career and internship opportunities later on. Here are 5 reasons why:

Reason #1: Employers Are Looking at Your Social Media

According to a recent JobVite survey, just about every employer will eventually take a look at your social media activities as part of the recruiting/hiring process. The ultimate hiring decision has always been a subjective one and most often comes down to personal characteristics and soft skills. Social media now provides employers with a fast, easy, efficient and inexpensive way to assess your character, maturity, genuineness, credibility, overall “likeability” and cultural fit. Therefore, making that inspection easier and less time consuming for employers by being transparent and directing employers to your social media profile links will not only be appreciated by the potential employer but will likely be advantageous to you as well. Rather than dwelling on the potential negatives, you should be working to unlock the positive powers of social media by building a well-rounded, robust and easy to find online presence accurately depicting your talents, activities and accomplishments.

Reason #2: Since Employers Are Looking Then Give Them Something to See

Recruiters have neither the time nor the interest to search social media simply to find reasons to reject you. When recruiters look, logic dictates they look because they want to learn more about you, opening up a door of opportunity to set yourself apart from other qualified applicants. An overload of photos depicting social activities is not nearly as detrimental to your professional interests as not being found online at all. If this is a concern, you can use the summer to counterbalance your social activities with more professional, career oriented content. The key point is to leverage your social media by making sure you can be found rather than deactivating social media accounts or creating aliases to remain hidden.

Reason #3: The Best Offense is a Good Defense

Every company that is searching for employees online likely has a significant marketing and/or corporate presence on social media. Do your research and then follow your list of targeted companies. For each company you follow, you will be engaging with an important mix of employees, vendors and customers who will all be discussing real-life issues in real-time. As you start engaging by commenting and sharing newsfeeds, you will begin to identify real people behind a company’s curtain and they will begin to recognize you. Remember that social media is not a passive activity so keep researching, keep connecting, keep building and you will be found.

Interacting with industry experts, companies and executives is recommended if, and only if, your social media is in proper order.  Remember that whenever you send a message using a social network’s messaging system or otherwise post, you are also necessarily transmitting a digital dossier containing your entire profile and activity specific to that social network. This includes all past posts, photos, friends and followers. By having your social media optimized for inspection, you can then use social media to freely and safely interact with businesses and industry leaders and will start building a strong network as a result.

Reason #4: Many Businesses Are Using Social Media to Proactively Recruit Employees

This is all so much more than simply creating a LinkedIn account. Many companies are searching for talent on Facebook and Twitter as well. Therefore, this is also about learning how to leverage the capabilities of Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to your full potential by going beyond the basic post and like functions. Surveys continue to show that a surprisingly large number of recruiters are using Facebook to find qualified candidates, especially when looking for candidates who may not be on LinkedIn because they are not actively looking for jobs.

The ultimate goal is to be found when a company taps into social media’s big data search function by understanding your personal search metrics and the proper keywords needed to describe your unique set of skills, talents and qualities.

Reason #5: Proactively Managing Social Media is an Essential Life Skill

Social media is here to stay and will continue to influence character assessments made by grad schools, scholarship committees, internship selection committees, employers, landlords and future significant others. It is time to learn how your social media can work for you rather than against you by accurately reflecting your persona, skills and attributes for people to see and view.

Networking at Your Summer Internship

Professional schmoozing is one of the keys to turning a summer gig into a permanent job. Because networking (done right) leaves a great impression on the employer, it can lead to a permanent job offer or a handy recommendation. Here’s how:

Beef Up Your Memory. When summer interns bump into the same high-level manager on their way to get coffee the manager will be a lot more impressed if the potential employee remembers something about them, says Anna Mok, a Strategic Relationships partner at Deloitte & Touche. Mok suggests that interns should put in the effort to remember anecdotes and names of co-workers and keep notes on whom they’ve met.

Be Sincere. Kristen Garcia, a group sales manager at Macy’s West (M) says that her genuine interest in meeting others from the company got her the job offer after she interned at Macy’s two years ago. “I introduced myself briefly to someone who wasn’t my direct boss, and it got me to work on an advertising project that the rest of the interns weren’t working on,” Garcia says. “But I never misrepresented myself and was always sincere.” Butler agrees, “To be indiscriminate for the sake of networking is going to be a waste of your time and not get you what you want.”

Find Some Face Time. Online networking sites, such as LinkedIn, are great. But to truly build connections, Mok, encourages interns to join professional organizations in their field to get valuable face time. Especially for those in a large city, a variety of networking groups are available and organizers are often thrilled to get younger members. Dave Wills, vice-president of Seattle-based Cascade Link, encourages interested interns to join tech clubs and professional organizations organizations. “Through those clubs we’ve met people whom we’ve hired as interns or to work on other projects.”

Join in the Big Kid Activities. Interns don’t need to stick to their own kind. Instead, ask to play in the company softball league or volunteer with their charity of choice. For those willing to be more proactive it helps to create an activity others from the company would be excited to join.

Show Up Alone. If fellow interns at the company don’t join that optional lunch or head over for a few drinks at a happy hour—go alone and meet others at the organization. In fact, not bringing work friends to networking events helps guests leave their comfort zone and meet new contacts, according to a study by Columbia Business School professors Paul Ingram and Michael Morris.

Skip the E-Mail. Most key figures at a company are overwhelmed with their inbox, so instead of being 1 out of 200 messages, pick another way to communicate. Instead, a quick hello or a short chat goes a long way according to Wills. “A phone call is still appropriate,” he says and encourages interns to figure out a convenient time in the day. “I’m always booked solid in the mornings, but usually the afternoons for me are pretty laid-back”.

Save the Tough for Last. Reach out to those who are easiest to approach first—hold off on chatting with the heads of the company who probably know less about incoming interns. “Don’t start at the top of the food chain—network with people who can still identify with where you are as a student intern,” says Ken Keeley, executive director of the Career Opportunities Center at Carnegie Mellon’s Tepper School of Business. Going to the higher-ups later in the summer also increases the chance that a colleague will put in a good word about the intern before the actual approach.

Evaluate Them. Not only is networking a tool interns use to stand out, it’s also a way for students to find out whether they’re willing to commit to a full-time job. “Many times these organizations force students to make big decisions before campus recruiting, so the companies will know how much recruiting they have to do during the school year.” Garcia, who received her offer in September of senior year, agrees: “Not only did I want to make a good impression on the company, I wanted the company to make a good impression on me.”

Source: Dizik, Alina. “Networking for Interns.” www.businessweek.com Bloomberg, L.P. 18 June 2007. Web. 04 June 2014

Career Potential: Working at an Ad Agency

This summer here at Wasserman, we want to help give some insight into particular career fields that you may not have previously considered. Here, Sydney Mai, MCC ’17, offers forth some thoughts on working in advertising.

Want a career like Mad Men’s Don Draper? Want to build an empire on Madison Ave. while spearheading a talented, dynamic team? Want office experience but dread the humdrum nine-to-five white-collar cycle? If you’re in for a little adventure, working at an ad agency is one career potential you can’t skip.

I was exposed to the concept of ad agency work in my Advertising & Marketing class last semester with Professor Eugene Secunda (to NYU future marketers: the course is a must-take). All through high school, I always thought that whatever field I ended up in, whether it was to be journalism, PR, or marketing, I’d always opt for the creative path. Truth is, an artist doesn’t have to make arts to be creative. Whether you’re a creator, a strategist, a communicator, or a businessperson, there’s a place to express your inner artistry at an ad agency.

With the explosion of social networks in recent years, the business of digital advertising is burgeoning alongside traditional advertising. The basic structure of a full-service ad agency, nevertheless, remains the quite static:

  • The account department acts as an intermediary between the advertiser (client) and the agency, communicates finance-related matters, and works closely with all internal departments to develop content & ensure that the advertiser’s message is being delivered.
  • The strategy department, also called account planning, conducts research that provides the basis for the campaign. Remember: the creative process starts with an insight!
  • The creative department is in charge of writing and designing the ad campaign. Good creatives are full with fresh ideas and know how to smoothly incorporate the advertiser’s message within their creative context.
  • The media & interactive department acquire outlets to run the campaign: prints, television, websites, social media, etc.
  • The production department executes the campaign. From printing ads to contracting directors for TV commercials, they turn plans into actions.

These vital elements of a full-service agency work like gears in a clock: everything has to be in sync. The creative department can’t go overboard with a creative idea and neglect the advertiser’s budget or intended messages. Same goes for the strategy department: account planners can’t squander a client’s budget conducting restless surveys and focus group researches. Therefore, an ad agency needs a capable account team to lubricate its gears, keeping its component departments on par with one another.

It is also important to keep in mind that an ad agency must hold great accountability for its statements. While it is easy to make unfounded claims sound convincing, it is extremely difficult – even impossible – to amend those claims and the retrieve the reputation that’s been lost. Respect your client by being accountable for your words.

Want to get your feet wet in this ever-changing, fast-paced business? Start now by searching for an internship. One of the most exciting facts about the ad world is that you learn as you go. Therefore, don’t worry too much about your background and experiences – be confident and show your passion, knowledge, and creativity. Impress your interviewers with latest articles from Ad Age & Ad Week. With your first internship, be even more flexible and look into marketing & PR positions to see how these practices crisscross and correlate. Best of luck with your endeavors!

Summer Spotlight Series with FindSpark

Recently, Victoria Cana, MCC ’16, shared a recap of her day working with @FindSpark. Click on the logo below for a recap.

Keep tuning into our blog throughout the next few months for more spotlights on summer jobs and internships.

Secrets to Landing a Job in PR & Communications

By: Ayeesha Kanji, NYU Wasserman Center @ SCPS Graduate Assistant

Recently, Rachel Frint from the NYU Wasserman Center @ SCPS hosted a webinar with Brittany Mullings, HR Associate at Prosek Partners on the Secrets of Landing a Job in PR & Communications.  In case you missed it, here are a few strategies to breaking into this competitive field:

Your Resume & Cover Letter

·      Maximum two pages, preferably one page in PDF format.

·      Pay attention to formatting details (Are all bullet points aligned? Dates aligned at the margin? Consistency in spacing?) Ensure grammar is correct.

·      Nix your objective at the top of your resume and outline your areas of expertise utilizing key words within the field, such as client relations, media relations, pitching and public speaking.

·      Use a personalized cover letter that explains employment gaps, describes why you switched industries and parallels your experience to the job description.

You & Social Media

·      Google yourself to see what positive and negative links work against you and work for you to maintain a clean and professional image. Sign-up at www.brandyourself.com to monitor your Google search results.

·      On LinkedIn use a professional picture, keep your profile up-to-date and follow companies you are interested in.

·      Ensure your public profile represents your professional brand between all social media you follow and subscribe to.

Interview Tips

·      Prepare three to five questions to ask in the interview which are not answered through researching and/or using the company website.

·      The interview is your opportunity to begin a dialogue and talk about what is not on your resume, personalize your responses and be genuine in your tone during the interview.

·      Within 24 hours send a thank-you note in either an email or as a card.

To develop your own career action plan for landing a job in public relations and communications, schedule an appointment with a NYU Wasserman Center Career Coach through NYU CareerNet.

Making the Most of Your Internship Experience

Sanjana Kucheria, CAS ’16, is interning this summer with a real estate investment company. Here, she offers some tips on making the most of your internship experience.

It’s been two weeks since I started my internship at Cottonwood Residential, a real estate investment company. Honestly, this is my first internship out of my hometown as well, so I knew I had to make an extra effort to get acclimated to the city as well as the work environment. There are two other interns working along side me in Acquisitions.

My first week was…tough. Applying all of the knowledge gained in the classroom setting is different, and maybe even a little difficult, which is why I share with you my first tip:

1. Don’t be afraid to ask questions, even if they may sound a little ridiculous to you. Even with everything I learned in classes and whatnot, I still had questions I needed to go the manager about. Luckily, he was more than happy to help, even going as far as saying, “I’m glad you’re trying to get this right”. Maybe not the best compliment out there, but here’s what I took away from it.

2. Learn what you have to (and more) early on. Whether that’s how to input numbers in excel or how to build a PowerPoint slide the way your company /boss wants it. It may look careless if you ask how to do something in the middle of your internship rather than in the beginning.

3. Take advantage of lunch breaks. It’s probably the only time you will get to talk to employees outside of your division. Ask them questions about their jobs, lives, etc. Don’t be the lone intern. No one will come up to you.

4. Show enthusiasm in your work. My internship requires me to do a lot of financial analysis of many properties. Although it may not sound real exciting, I look forward to tackling property after property when I walk into the office. Strike up a conversation with you boss/manager about industry/market trends, questions you had about a particular case etc. Showing that extra eagerness in your work and the company’s work will definitely make your experience all that more memorable.

Overall, just really enjoy each day of your internship!