Tag Archives: career transition

Tips for Wrapping Up Your Internship on a Positive Note

Nicole Klein Isenhour, Assistant Director at The Wasserman Center for Career Development at NYU-Poly, offers forth some tips for completing your internship.

You’re nearing the end of your internship so it must be time to throw caution to the wind right? WRONG…the final days, weeks, hours of your summer internship are equally as important as your first, if not more! How you leave things off will the employer will leave a lasting impression and set the stage for things moving forward. You always want to end things on a good note and have the employer remember your hard work all summer. Wrapping up the right way can lead to references, recommendations, mentorship, keeping in touch and most importantly: potential consideration for future positions down the line. Not sure what to do? No problem, that’s where we come in with the top 5 tips for wrapping up your internship.

  • Make sure your projects are covered– Finish as much as you can but in the event you are leaving before a project is finished, leave strong documentation so that your coworkers can pick up where you left off or a new person can come in and know what you have already done or what needs to be done. Your coworkers will appreciate you keeping them in the loop and leaving thorough notes.
  • Schedule a final meeting with your supervisor – Review what you have done; projects, your goals moving forward, advice they might have for you in terms of professional development. Mention what you have learned and how this experience has been valuable to you.
  • Ask for constructive feedback – Is there anything you did really well and are there areas for improvement that you could work on moving forward? A thing or two you might be able to improve upon? It shows the employer that you are mature, that you care about your growth and development and that you want to continue to improve and succeed.
  • Thank everyone– Thank your supervisor but also thank anyone else you reported to and perhaps some you did not report to but wanted to thank for the experience, such as higher ups in the company. Ask for a few minutes of their time to drop in and discuss your internship. Use this time to informationally network, share what you learned, how you grew from your time there. Ask to keep in touch in the future, after the internship concludes. Also thank your fellow interns, coworkers and any other staff that contributed to your positive experience. Appreciation goes a long way and leaves a lasting impression. Send handwritten thank you notes as well!
  • Stay connected– Send a hello email every month or 2 to the employer. See what they have been doing in the news or what is happening in the industry to use as some talking points, forward an article that might be applicable to their business and of interest to them. This shows you are invested and care about keeping up with industry trends and current events. You can also share something relevant you did in a class, a group project, a conference you attended, share it!

As always, feel free to make an appointment through CareerNet and come by the Wasserman Center for Career Development to discuss your personal internship experience and career goals/ next steps!

Summer Spotlight Series with Talent Tech

Did you miss Executive Director, Jonathan’s, day at Talent Tech Labs? If so, click on the logo below for a recap.

Sound like a place you’d like to work? Check out the openings on CareerNet: Job IDs: 939426 and 917366.

Summer Spotlight Series with NYU Steinhardt

Did you miss Steinhardt student Rose’s day as an analyst at a market intelligence consulting firm in Shanghai? If so, click on the logo below for a recap.

Want to find an internship, part-time job, or full-time position? Make an appointment through CareerNet to meet with a career coach and start exploring all of the available and exciting opportunities.

Summer Spotlight Series with Flashtalking

Did you miss Nick’s day as a Campaign Management Intern with @Flashtalking? If so, click on the logo below for a recap.

Want to find an internship, part-time job, or full-time position? Make an appointment through CareerNet to meet with a career coach and start exploring all of the available and exciting opportunities.

 

Summer Spotlight Series with Opportunity Finance Network

Recently, Caroline Deng, Stern ’17, shared her day working with @OppFinance. Here, she shares some updates on her summer.

I’m coming to the end of my internship at Opportunity Finance Network (OFN) in Philadelphia. I’m originally from California, and as a freshman, this was my first full summer away from home, as well as my first internship. At first, I definitely felt some anxiety over the transition from the busy streets of Manhattan to a completely different city, but I’ve found many ways to keep myself busy.

1. Exploration.

I run a personal travel blog at www.theurbantouriste.wordpress.com, and coming to a new city gave me the opportunity to explore a new city. So, I invested in monthly transpasses for the SEPTA, the Philadelphia version of the MTA.

When people think of the City of Brotherly Love, the first images that come to mind are often the Liberty Bell, Betsy Ross, and/or the Declaration of Independence. But Philly is more than just a cheesesteak. Armed with my monthly pass, I chose to get to know the city outside of the traditional tourist traps.

Philadelphia is home to one of the largest urban park systems in the entire world, with 63 parks spanning over 9,200 acres. This acreage is almost the size of 11 Central Parks!

My favorite park in Philly has been the Spruce Street Harbor Park, a pop-up summertime village on the Delaware River complete with a hammock garden, outdoor seating, fountains, a restaurant, and for those who are legal, a beer garden. This pop-up park is available from June 27 through August 31, and I’ve found it to be a great place to read and relax.

During another weekend, I traveled outside the city to Montgomery County to visit the University of Pennsylvania’s Morris Arboretum. With 92 acres of labeled flowers, trees, and plants, the place provided a worthwhile escape from city life.

2. Fitness.

The variety of colorful salads and fresh, local produce that my OFN coworkers bring to the office has inspired me to adopt a healthier lifestyle, including physical fitness. The word “exercise” used to make me shudder and reminded me of the awful smell of sweat and patchy, red, post-workout skin. But by stretching to buti yoga, throwing sharp jabs in piloxing, and feeling a comfortable soreness in your muscles after weight lifting, I’ve discovered that I actually enjoy the euphoric feeling that exercising gives me.

Staying physically active has inspired me to set ambitious goals, and I’ve begun a 20-week training program to run a half-marathon. I am hoping to run the Shanghai International Half-Marathon this coming November while I am studying abroad there in the fall.

My summer in Philadelphia has been a very different experience, one that has pushed me to take full advantage of the city and to explore new interests.

I may not necessarily have had the comforts of home here in Philadelphia, but the overall time here has been extremely rewarding.

Being Part of the PepsiCo Family

Carmiel Dizon is an NYU Stern Management and Marketing student graduating in 2015. This summer, she’s here to share some of her thoughts about interning with PepsiCo.

Stepping onto the PepsiCo shuttle to White Plains, I feel the intensity of each heartbeat as adrenaline punches through my veins. With each reverberating ‘click’ of my shoes, all I focus on are those revolving doors, the gates toward something unknown. Dozens of people dressed in suits and casual jeans groggily shuffle to the revolving doors after a long commute. While waiting my turn to pass the shiny glass gates, my mind explodes into a symphony consisting of fears and dread- only to be followed by the mellowing clam of those doors. As the individual in front of me passes through, I clench myself in anticipation and pass on through. The first of many trials passes ushering a wave of relief and excitement until twenty curious pairs of eyes dart toward me. Nervousness grips me once more. Like any first day, the waltz of nervousness clashes with the rumba of excitement. Yet despite the conflict of emotions raging within my heart, the soothing wave of belonging sets in. Calamity dissipates as the fears subside. The image ingrained into my mind elicits an emotional comfort of something like home- a place of belonging.

After the steady routine of sipping coffee and walking through the lobby adorned with familiar logos depicting Pepsi and Tropicana, I feel less like an outsider. Four weeks later, I come to appreciate the challenges associated with marketing. Each task not only allows me to reinforce and expand my knowledge, but also allows for continuous improvement. Though my experience has been brief, my own conception of marketing practices amplifies given a unique set of opportunities. A few weeks ago I attended Dew Tour, an action sports event powered by Mountain Dew, where I witnessed the myriad of theories being implemented and redefined in practice. A soda became more than just a beverage. It brings people together through emphasizing a unique lifestyle that connects with an audience on a deeper, and more emotional level.

My experience at PepsiCo must be understood as a shift in my understanding of community. The comradery shared by employees quickly permeated into the intern sphere of culture. Not even two weeks into my internship, I felt fully immersed as a full-time member of my team. During agency calls, my manager always asks for my opinion. He values any creative input I am able to muster, which results in greater confidence of my own abilities. Feeling important and valued by management is imperative to my success. For instance, while waiting for the 4 train, I can approach a colleague and immediately feel welcomed. As the conversation delves into an exchange between weekend plans after exchanging pleasantries, I can only imagine who I was at the beginning. That fear and nervous anticipation has been replaced by the familiarity of a community- a community I am a part of. At PepsiCo, I’m treated more than an intern. I’m treated like a member of the Pepsi family. For that, I am truly grateful and definitely ready for what is yet to come. First days are always intimidating, but are nothing more than the first gate into tomorrow. A tomorrow of growth nurtured through hardship and supported by those with a single goal in mind… success.

Want to find an internship, part-time job, or full-time position? Make an appointment through CareerNet to meet with a career coach and start exploring all of the available and exciting opportunities.

Summer Internship at AllianceBernstein, Part I

Aziza Sultan is a current NYU student in the accelerated Bachelor’s/Master’s program. She is studying politics for her Bachelor’s degree and concentrating on political economy for her Master’s. She is currently a summer intern at AllianceBernstein’s New York City midtown offices in the Technology and Operations Program.Here, she offers forth some thoughts on the first half of her experiences. Stay tuned for an update later this summer.

When I first decided I wanted to do a summer internship in finance, many of my friends at school wondered why a student of politics would go into a seemingly irrelevant field of work. After getting through this initial question, they wondered why I wanted to spend most of my summer working in a notoriously tough field, where people are portrayed as overly-aggressive, overworked and cut-throat. Rather than inspire me, these characterizations led me to become a little hesitant at the decision to accept my summer internship.

As the first half of my internship is behind me, I can honestly say that my experience at AllianceBernstein has been nothing similar to what my friends had described the dark scary world of finance to be like. If I had to use one word to describe the social and developmental aspect of my internship thus far, I would have to choose nurturing. I am surprised that even at a large, reputable firm, people are really willing to go out of their way to make sure you are noticed when you do good work, to say hello, or to answer career questions you may have. This culture of openness and warmth is practiced by people at all levels of the organization. At the end of our first week, interns were treated to a picnic in Central Park with the associates, and just last week I met with the managing director of a division different from mine over coffee. He has been with the firm for almost two decades and he gave me a lot of worthwhile advice.

The firm and the internship program really make it a point to foster their interns in an environment that is not only educational in terms of the work I have been learning to do, but also seeks to develop crucial soft skills that are necessary in this industry. There have been a plethora of events – ranging from “How to Network Effectively” where four veterans of the firm spoke about networking strategies, and how networking has aided them in their careers, to “Communicating with Impact” where the director of Learning and Development for the firm gave us pointers on presenting information to people during work presentations.  We even had a presentation by a managing director who spoke to us about her work with Congress and the state of Rhode Island regarding the 529k plan. Next week the Senior Vice President of one of the divisions invited myself and two other interns to lunch at the café in our building. These are just a few of the ways in which my internship experience so far has been a much more vibrant experience than just working on a computer the whole day, and being the token office intern.

This is not to say that my work has been completely easy and without its own set of challenges. It is nice, however, to learn new things from people who are both willing to teach you and to be patient when doing so, and also to be around people who want you to do well. Daily, I have three people at the firm with whom I work directly. These include my manager, my mentor and the associate in my department. Almost all of my training was done on the job, and I have taken on parts of projects from all three of these people. One of the things that was unexpected to me was that I do routine daily work in my division, some of it revolving around regular communication with people in other banks. In this sense I feel that I am an integral part of my team.

In the next half of my internship I look forward to the upcoming scheduled events, learning more about finance and interacting more with people in the firm. I also will be working on testing for a new system platform through which my division is going to be working, so I will be busy with that transition.

Want to find an internship, part-time job, or full-time position? Make an appointment through CareerNet to meet with a career coach and start exploring all of the available and exciting opportunities.

Summer Spotlight Series with Opportunity Finance Network

Recently, Caroline Deng, Stern ’17, shared her day working with @OppFinance. Click the logo below for a recap.

Keep tuning into our blog throughout the next few months for more spotlights on summer jobs and internships.

Four Influential Fashion Figures and the Career Lessons They Can Inspire In Us

This summer here at Wasserman, we want to help give some insight into particular career fields that you may not have previously considered. Here, Sydney Mai, MCC ’17, offers forth some thoughts about fashion icons and shows how they can inspire.

What do you think of when hearing the word “fashion”? Is it the latest clothes, catwalks, runway models, after-parties, magazine covers, or the Paris Fashion Week? Truth is, the fashion world is not all just centered around the glitz and glam that appears on the surface. It’s about the road to making it there and the people who once traveled that road – fashion figures with inspiring stories that have turned into valuable career lessons for us.

  1. Coco Chanel – “A girl should be two things: classy and fabulous”

Whether it is Chanel no.5, the little black dress, or her witty words of wisdom, Mademoiselle Chanel sure knew how to do things in style. Coco Chanel’s legacy travels far beyond her century-old fashion empire: she is a legend, a trailblazer, a vision of elegance and sophistication, and most importantly, an inspiration to millions of women all around the world. Coming from humble beginnings, Coco Chanel spent most of her teenage years inside the constricting walls of a convent where she learned needlework from the nuns. Yet, talents like to break free – her nunnery daily wear was soon transformed into ageless jet-set designs, ones that helped establish her iconic personal brand.

Lesson to learn: Whatever you do in life, do it with style! Build your own personal brand with an unforgettable trademark. Don’t be afraid to break boundaries and explore your potentials!

2. Tyra Banks: “A smart model is a good one”

Think modeling is all about posing for the camera? Miss Banks will prove you wrong. Tyra Banks revolutionized people’s common trivialization of a career in the modeling industry with her versatility and creativity: she takes on the role of a TV personality, actress, producer, writer, businesswoman, and philanthropist. Despite the phenomenal success of America’s Next Top Model, hardly does one know that the show concept was first poked fun at when being introduced to CW, for the producers didn’t take models seriously. Top Model now appears in over 35 countries and its creator, Miss Banks, continues to show the world her aptitude with a certificate from Harvard’s Management Extension Program, earned in 2011.

Lesson to learn: Versatility is what every employer looks for. An ability to take on and fit into any role proves that you’re the next top candidate. Why stick to one role or conform to stereotypes? The world is your oyster!

3.Ralph Lauren: “I don’t design clothes. I design dreams.”

Ralph Lauren’s rags-to-riches story has long motivated generations and generations of aspiring young fashion designers who dream of making it in the business. Born and raised in the Bronx to a Jewish immigrant family in the 50s, Lauren knew what it was like to have little and to dream big. As a teenager, he spent hours in movie theaters immersing himself in the magical world of films, dreaming of a better life. Childhood fantasies were soon turned into actions as the creative world moved to New York City in 1960s, determined to make it big.

Lesson to learn: “The creative adult is the child who has survived” (Le Guin). It doesn’t matter where you come from, it’s OK to dream big and even to have larger-than-life ambitions. The secret lies in transforming your ambitions into plans then into actions. It’s up to you to make things happen.

4. Anna Wintour: “Fashion’s not about looking back. It’s always about looking forward.”

With Anna Wintour, it is always “on to the next,” as Chanel creative director Karl Lagerfeld puts it. Fear her or worship her, Anna Wintour is indisputably the most powerful woman in the fashion industry today. Over two decades spearheading the Vogue America team, how does she keep this 300-billion-dollar enterprise up and running? People who’ve had the privilege of being on Anna’s team are wowed by her decisiveness. Trusting her gut is indeed the key to her success.

Lesson to learn: Know your goals. Be decisive and listen to your heart.

These are the people who have day by day, bit by bit, inspired me to realize my dream of working in fashion marketing & advertising. Their career lessons, however, are applicable regardless of any industry or discipline you’ve chosen to go into. Good luck with your endeavors wherever they may take you!

 

The Job Search for Seasoned Professionals

Date/Time: Thursday, July 10th, 2014 | 6-7:30 PM

Location: Wasserman Center for Career Development, Presentation Room B

Thinking about changing jobs?  Getting back into the labor market and don’t know where to start? If you feel like you have great skills at your job, but not at job search, then we have the workshop for you. Join Steven Greenberg, CBS radio anchor of “Your Next Job” and expert on job search, who will discuss a new approach to getting hired in today’s competitive market.    The talk will focus on experienced jobseekers, who often face additional obstacles.   Steven will discuss how to combat the hidden bias against older candidates and offer concrete tools and strategies for enhancing your job search. There are new rules for success in today’s labor market, and Steven will help you develop a successful job search strategy.

Speaker Details:

Steven Greenberg is the creator and anchor of the CBS Radio news program “Your Next Job”.  His features air 15 times each week on WCBS 880 in New York, and on other CBS radio news stations. He has written popular articles about job search for Forbes.com and CNN Money.com,  and his job board for jobseekers over 40 has been profiled on NPR’s All Things Considered.   He is also the founder of a recruiting firm and a temp agency.   He was general counsel and HR manager for one of the most successful toy manufacturers in the US.  He is an attorney who practiced at two highly prominent law firms in NY – Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft  and Chadbourne Parke. He lives in Westport, CT with his wife and four sons.

To RSVP:

For degreed NYU alumni and current students, please register through your NYU CareerNet account (click on the menu tab Events, then Seminars) to reserve a seat. If you do not have an account, please contact our reception desk at: 212.998.4730. Space is limited.