Tag Archives: full-time job

The Job Search for Seasoned Professionals

Date/Time: Thursday, July 10th, 2014 | 6-7:30 PM

Location: Wasserman Center for Career Development, Presentation Room B

Thinking about changing jobs?  Getting back into the labor market and don’t know where to start? If you feel like you have great skills at your job, but not at job search, then we have the workshop for you. Join Steven Greenberg, CBS radio anchor of “Your Next Job” and expert on job search, who will discuss a new approach to getting hired in today’s competitive market.    The talk will focus on experienced jobseekers, who often face additional obstacles.   Steven will discuss how to combat the hidden bias against older candidates and offer concrete tools and strategies for enhancing your job search. There are new rules for success in today’s labor market, and Steven will help you develop a successful job search strategy.

Speaker Details:

Steven Greenberg is the creator and anchor of the CBS Radio news program “Your Next Job”.  His features air 15 times each week on WCBS 880 in New York, and on other CBS radio news stations. He has written popular articles about job search for Forbes.com and CNN Money.com,  and his job board for jobseekers over 40 has been profiled on NPR’s All Things Considered.   He is also the founder of a recruiting firm and a temp agency.   He was general counsel and HR manager for one of the most successful toy manufacturers in the US.  He is an attorney who practiced at two highly prominent law firms in NY – Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft  and Chadbourne Parke. He lives in Westport, CT with his wife and four sons.

To RSVP:

For degreed NYU alumni and current students, please register through your NYU CareerNet account (click on the menu tab Events, then Seminars) to reserve a seat. If you do not have an account, please contact our reception desk at: 212.998.4730. Space is limited.

Industry Insights: Careers in Human Resources

Tingting Zhou, a Master’s candidate in the Human Reource Management and Development Program at NYU who is expecting to graduate May 2015, and Ross Brand, a Master’s candidate in the Human Resource and Development Program at NYU who is expecting to graduate May 2014, both attended Industry Insights: Careers in Human Resources on Friday March 28th.  The NYU Wasserman Center@SCPS hosted a panel featuring Slyne Louissaint, Real Hospitality, Tim Collins, IBM, Annmarie Payne, Blue Engine, Jeanelle Degraffenreid, First Protocol, and Christina Caruso, Tommy. They are from different industries such as hospitality, fashion, IT (IBM), non-profit, and event services.

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Here are six valuable tips shared by the panelists:

1. Know your business and brand

As an HR professional, it is critical to know your business. HR professionals are the first point of contact at their organizations and serve as examples for other employees. You need to be conscious of your role in protecting and maintaining the brand by how you conduct yourself and your knowledge of the company. Know the business, its financials and its competitors. Be able to speak the language and utilize the terminology that people in your business and industry employ.

2. Data is your friend

More firms are leveraging HR predictive analytics to obtain insights on which candidates to hire, how to identify the factors contributing to successful employee performance and what measures are more likely to retain key talent. Analytics is all about data. Excel skills are essential for carrying out many HR roles. HR professionals can stand out from their peers by understanding how to use Excel (macros, pivot tables), learning about workforce analytics and predictive analytics, and knowing how to talk about financial information.

3. Pick the right industry for you

HR professionals increase their chances for success when they find organizations and industries that fit their personalities. The panelists agreed on the importance of being knowledgeable about the industry in which you want to work and having a hunger to learn more about that industry. It is critical both to research different industries when searching for a new opportunity and know yourself. Jeanelle Degraffenreid mentioned conducting informational interviews to learn from professionals in your preferred industry.  Slyne Louissant added that if you have experience in another industry and want to switch, be open to trying new things and focus on your transferable skills.  You can think about your past experiences and highlight those that apply in your current search.  Finally, don’t forget to ask questions in interviews. While the interviewer is trying to find out if you are the right fit for the organization, you have every right to determine if the company and department will be a good place for you. For example, are you more comfortable carrying out tasks individually or working on a team? Use the opportunity to ask questions in an interview to gain valuable insights on what it is like to work at that organization.

4. Network, network and network

Some panelists believe 90% of jobs come from networking. Apart from LinkedIn, Tim Collins also recommended Twitter as a great tool for learning from, and interacting with, professionals in your industry. Read articles from publications such as Harvard Business Review posted by respected professionals and industry leaders you follow. Join Twitter Chats such as #TChat (Talent Culture Chat), which focuses on talent. Collins also shared a program at IBM called Social HR to illustrate the point that even the most conservative organizations are seeing value in going social and that social media is another area in which aspiring HR practitioners can contribute to their organizations. Christina Caruso recommended being authentic in social media and in your online brand while also being careful with what you share.  Annmarie Payne added that you should know what you have accomplished and come up with three things to brand yourself.  This will leave a positive impression on the people with whom you are networking.

5. Think outside the box

While everyone knows the importance of developing LinkedIn contacts and applying to jobs through company websites, creative people have landed jobs by visiting the company and even interacting directly with the CEO. Of course you will have to do sufficient research on the company and industry before implementing such creative job search tactics. Some panelists believe the paper resume is dying and that your online brand is becoming more important. Many applicants are also sending video resumes to HR. Candidates, who are good on camera, can engage the audience with more impact on video than on a paper resume. Nonetheless, it is still critical to have a paper resume that is appropriate for your target industry and free of grammatical errors and other typos. A splash of color may work well on a resume for a firm in a creative industry, but it might be a turnoff in a more traditional organization. All the HR professionals agree it is the time for jobs to chase candidates rather than candidates chasing jobs.

6. Look beyond traditional HR specialties

Compensation and Recruiting are fine career choices, but you can find opportunities to make a name for yourself and advance your career by contributing in such areas as Global Mobility, Diversity, Analytics and HR Technology. Panelists also recommended obtaining HR certifications.

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Globally Focused, Personalized Career

Rob McGillis, CAS Class of 2011, shares some insights into his career at TransPerfect, a leader in global language and business solutions.

I studied Economics, Romance Languages, and Arabic at NYU (with time abroad in Madrid and Beirut), and graduated in May, 2011. My interests have always been deeply tied to foreign languages, international affairs, and the global economy. After searching far and wide for a job that interested me, I luckily found TransPerfect on NYU’s CareerNet. My starting position as Project Coordinator in our Life Sciences group had me interacting with linguists all around the world within days. I was able to use my linguistic skills to communicate with many of them in their native languages, and build strong relationships. Over time, my ability to establish a unique rapport with our linguistic teams became a clear strength and passion, as well as the major area in which I could add the most value to my career and the company. Without the language skills I obtained at NYU, I would have not succeeded so quickly in this international environment. Learning a foreign language inherently requires one to adapt to different cultures and styles of communication, even in English. This helped me juggle the different backgrounds of my linguists as well as those of my colleagues.

It was not long before I was approached to consider a position in our Vendor Management team – one in which my interests and strengths are more integral to my work day and overall career than ever before. I jumped on the opportunity, and have been in that department ever since. I spend each day in communication with our current linguists, assisting them with whatever their needs may be, in addition to recruiting and testing new linguists to help expand our capabilities and resources to every corner of the globe. Ultimately, my managers did not see me just as a “Project Coordinator”, but rather, as “Rob”, and because of that they worked with me to build a career that is best suited for me, in a field which also benefits the company immensely. I am currently writing this blog from TransPerfect’s Tel Aviv office – the opportunity to travel is always present because we have so many offices around the globe. I have yet to hear my peers speak of a company that invests as much in development of the individual as TransPerfect. If you have an interest in international business, have an innovative side, want to be challenged and work hard, this is the place for you, and who knows where it will take you!

Does TransPerfect sound like a place you’d like to work? Apply on CareerNet, Job ID: 908030.

Wall Street Services Presents Tips for Resume Success

Have you always wondered what makes a resume stand out to a recruiter? Ideally, you want to provide evidence that your skills and experiences are a match for the job description as closely as possible. Apart from that, we want to share one specific insight that will boost your resume’s potential to entice a recruiter to give you a call.

The truth of the matter is that managers want people who get things done. The world is full of people who do things with little eye on the result. We look at hundreds of resumes each week and one of the key mistakes we see is listing tasks rather than accomplishments. By listing your accomplishments you will stand out and be noticed. Having your resume stand out as noticeable is the point of having a resume. If you are responding to a job posting, it is likely that hundreds of other people are responding as well. If your resume does not stand out, it will be lost in the sea of job seekers vying for the same few positions. In fact, the great probability is that your resume will first be screened by a junior person who knows little about the job you are applying for and is looking for three or four specific items.

Some Tips

AVOID: Listing your day-to-day tasks and responsibilities – for example:

-Researched breaks on aged swap payments to determine the cause for each.

-Prepared and analyzed daily reports

-Communicated with clients

INSTEAD: Detail an accomplishment that explicitly informs the tasks and technical abilities you have – for example:

-Extremely productive in risk reduction: reduced breaks from more than 6,000 to less than 100, completing the project ahead of target date

-Designed and implemented new daily reporting schematic which provided management with a wider range of critical information 2 hours earlier

-Provided critical information to over 4,000 clients

Highlighting your accomplishments will indicate to your recruiter that you are a motivated go-getter able to complete projects and ultimately bring value to their organization. To see more resume, interview and job search tips, visit our blog.

If you are interested in having your resume critiqued by an experienced recruiter in the finance industry, be sure to come to our Resumes & Cover Letters That Work: Presented by Wall Street Services event.  It will be held at the Wasserman Career Center at NYU on March 13th at 4:30pm.

Wall Street Services is a boutique recruiting firm in the finance industry. We place financial consultants on a project basis with well-known firms in New York City. Our mission is to place people into positions they love and provide the best consultants to our clients.

Networking On and Offline

Samantha Knoerzer, a Publishing graduate student in SCPS, offers insight into the recent Networking On and Offline event. She is currently a eBook production intern at Berghahn Books, an international, academic book publishing house that resides in Dumbo, Brooklyn and works as a social media coordinator for BiblioCrunch, a source for indie publishers which helps connect self-published authors and publishers with book publishing professionals to get new books and apps to the market.

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Networking is an important part of furthering your career while attending and after NYU.  Whether you are looking to begin your career, expand it, or even if you want to switch careers completely, panelist speakers highlighted that it is important to network and get to know people in your field in order to expand your opportunities. The panelists stressed that networking is not about calling everyone in search of a job. Rather it is about building relationships, staying in touch with your current network, sharing information, asking for assistance, and most importantly, being authentic.

The four most important tips from the panel were:

  1. The three main steps of networking:

    1. Setting a career vision: Understand why you should network. Networking is important, as everyone already knows. It is important to understand two things when networking: What is my career vision? And, what do I want my next steps to be? By understanding these two things, you can begin to map out a potential career path via networking.

    2. Analyze yourself: Understand what you should network. Many people get stuck at this section, knowing that they want to network, but not knowing how to do so. In order to begin this path to networking, you need to ask yourself: What knowledge/skills/info do I have now? And, what knowledge/skills/info do I NEED in order to begin my networking path? Once you understand this, you can begin to network for your career.

    3. Set networking goals: Create networking goals to complete your career goals. Some sample networking goals are: What is the next step I should take in my career? How can I make a career change into publishing? What qualities is a specific company looking for? What are the trends that are happening in my field? Why am I not getting hired? In order to answer some of these questions, start by making a networking inventory of all the people you already know.

  2. Finding networking contacts online: How do you find contacts to strangers in your field online? The answer: Always look for online networking opportunities. Plenty of places hold networking events advertised through social media. Some other networking actions can even be done directly through online. TaskRabbit, Findspark, Glassdoor, as well as many other sites allow people to go online and complete tasks and take part in online networking webinars in order to network directly from home. Taking part in social media, and following important people in the industry online is the other great way to network online. However, before you do anything, you should make sure to have your own social media up to date.

    1. Twitter networking tips: For Twitter make sure to complete your entire profile. Post a good icon image consisting of a headshot with a single colored background. Once that is done, make sure to follow important people and companies in your industry that have a huge pull in the networking world, and while you do this, share valuable content to be noticed. Finally, always make sure to ask questions on your Tweets to get people engaged with your page and make sure that you, yourself stay engaged with others in the social networking circles that surround you.

    2. Linked In Networking tips: For LinkedIn, make sure to use a profile summary, and once again use a professional photo with similar description as the requirement for your Twitter account. Make sure to always grow your network and join groups that can be of networking value to you. Look on sites such as linkedin.com/alumni to stay connected with your past networking circles, always pay attention to recommendations, and upload projects and portfolios whenever completed. And once again, most importantly, STAY ENGAGED!

    3. Sending emails for requesting informational conversation: Sometimes, the best way to network and really get to know more about a company is to set up an informational interview. From these you can learn valuable information about a company, and really connect with a circle that if you desire to work within, you should understand and connect to. When sending an informational interview/conversation email request make sure to keep it short and simple, sticking to the three main points: Who are you? Why are you writing to them? How much time is this going to take? Making sure to keep your email short and concise will give you the best way to become an interest of connection to the person you are emailing.

  3. Finding networking contacts offline: Offline is just as important, if not more important, than online networking. Going to events can be the best ways to make in person connections. Making in person connections gets people to know you by not only name, but face, which can help you in the long run when you show up to an office for an interview and see people you know. Like what was said in the panel, “Every time you step outside, it is an interview.” Stay friendly and get to know the people around you, even the people next to you in class, to ensure a great networking circle in every aspect of your life.

  4. How to build a relationship via networking: The steps to building a relationship are crucial. First, make sure to send a personalized message introducing yourself. After the meeting, make sure to send a thank you email consisting of follow up thoughts and questions that you still may have. After one month, consider reaching out to send a virtual hand, if needed. Four to six months past that, plan to meet up for coffee, or setup a phone chat. Nine to twelve months after your original introduction, consider an email or phone call consisting of personal and professional updates in order to stay in touch. After this, always send some reconnect emails and attempt to repeat the same cycle in order to keep your networking connection strong.

Next steps: What can you do right now? Make networking manageable; do it a little bit at a time and challenge yourself. Right now start establishing your networking skills by meeting 2 new contacts each week, schedule one informational interview a month, and attempt to reconnect with one person you’ve lost touch with each week. Reach out to existing contacts, takes notes for personal touch, select a tracking mechanism and schedule check-in points. You can even consider scheduling an appointment with a career coach to review your networking plan and help with your correspondence. This is available right now at NYU’s Wasserman Center. All of these opportunities are available to you right now. Why not take advantage of them?

What’s Next? Finance: Beyond Investment Banking

Curious about careers outside the scope of traditional investment banking opportunities? Come to Wasserman this Friday, February 28th at 12:30pm. Panelists will share their insight into different career paths within finance. Through this event, you will learn how to jumpstart your career, prep for interviews in the industry, and how to effectively network your way to success.

Speakers will be on hand from the following organizations:




RSVP today through CareerNet!

Under Armour: Part-time Positions Can Lead to a Career

-By: Taylor Bechtel (center, top row-black shirt) – Selling Specialist at UA Brand House in Harbor East, Baltimore

I remember the first time I walked into the Under Armour Brand House in Harbor East, Baltimore. At the time, it was just a hollow shell waiting to be filled with the latest and greatest Under Armour product. I remember standing there, anxious like you would be before taking the field for a big game. But really, that’s the best way to look at the Brand House. To me, it’s much more than just a retail store; it’s my playing field, my arena. Each and every day that I come into work, I try to keep that game-day mentality – I can relate as a student athlete. I have learned to view my fellow associates as my Teammates. This sort of mentality has taught me the valuable lesson of accountability and teamwork. Working at the Brand House has given me the opportunity to build upon my skills and has really allowed me to develop and grow.  The way I see it, the game has just begun for me and my career. As ambitious as my goals may be, I know that I need to put time and effort into practice and preparation. But working at the UA Brand House has truly allowed me to practice and hone my skills. It has taught me a lot about my strengths and weaknesses, and has allowed me to prepare myself for the next level. It has taught me the importance of working as a team, and that you must always keep a goal in sight. Just as UA’s Founder and CEO Kevin Plank would say, “you have to stay humble and hungry”. Working here has taught me I should never settle or let myself become complacent; improvements can always be made. Here at Under Armour, we pride ourselves on passion and continuous innovation. I’ve also learned to constantly strive towards improving myself and those around me.  Now, I’m interviewing for an In-Store Visual Merchandising opportunity within arguably one of the greatest Retail hubs in the country, NYC (Soho) and an opportunity to grow my Retail career with one of the hottest Brands on the planet – Under Armour!  It all started by accepting a part-time opportunity within the first-ever UA Brand House while putting myself through college.

Sound like a place you would like to work or intern? In case you missed Under Armour at the Career Fair, they’ll be back on campus at the Palladium Center in front of the gym this Friday, February 21st from 11:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. Come by and see them about their exciting job opportunities

In Case You Missed It: Day in the Life at AYI

Did you miss Justin’s day as a Senior Software Engineer with @AYIDating? If so,click on the logo below.

Sound like a place you’d like to work? Apply on NYU CareerNet, Job IDs are: Android Developer 917889 & 917891, Data Analyst 917882, iOS Engineer 917880, Product Manager 917887, Web Developer 917885.

In Case You Missed It: Week in the Life at Deloitte

The good folks of @lifeatdeloitte recently tweeted about their lives at work. Click the logo below for a recap.

Sound like a place you’d like to work? You are in luck because there are positions open. Apply on NYU CareerNet for the following positions:

Consulting:

Business Analyst Summer Scholar – Job Id 909961

Business Technology Analyst Summer Scholar – Job Id 909965

Human Capital Analyst Summer Scholar – Job Id 909970

Deloitte National Leadership Conference (Human Capital) – Job Id 916435

Deloitte National Leadership Conference (Technology) – Job Id 916434

NextGen Leaders National Conference – Job Id 916436

AERS/Tax:

Deloitte Summer Programs (AERS/Tax/FAS DNLC & Mentor Program) –917316

NextGen Leaders National Conference (AERS/Tax/FAS) – Job Id 920112

Alternative Spring Break – Job Id 920113

Additionally, Deloitte will be on campus at the following events:

Deloitte Spring Information Session on 2/4 at 7:45pm at The Wasserman Center

Diversity Deloitte Bootcamp on 2/5 from 6-8pm

Engineering & Technology Career Fair on 2/6 from 11am-3pm at NYU-Poly

BAP/SAS Spring Information Session on 2/11 from 12-2pm at Tisch Hall

 

 

Career Fair Prep From @Razorfish

Greg Pfaff, a Senior Recruiter at Razorfish, offers ideas on how to market yourself to the digital community. Helpful information as the Spring Job & Internship Fair fast approaches. Be sure to visit their booth on 1/30 at Kimmel and again on 2/6 at the Engineering & Technology Spring Career Fair at NYU-Poly for more information.

“Marketing yourself as a developer”

A major barrier for students coming out of a university looking for jobs is that they lack “professional experience”. Most companies have tight deadlines and can’t afford to train or take a chance on a rising star in the development world. Sadly, this leads to solid engineers/students being passed on with lots of potential. Here are three things that every student should do to make themselves as marketable as possible coming right out of college.

Keep an up-to-date social coding profile.

It is so important to show potential hiring managers how active you are on social networking coding sites like Github and Codepen. It shows that you not only have a thirst to learn/solve problems but you are active about it in the community. Additionally, you could also take a website that is currently live and re-code it to make it better. Also, have your own online portfolio, a central hub for all potential employers to see.  Put all of your ideas/concepts/passion projects/live websites on there. These are great ways to visually showcase what you have done and most importantly gives managers a way to tangibly see your code. This could give you a leg up against competition when going through an interview process.

Attend industry events.

These are a great way to get your name out there. The development community is thriving and it seems every technology or framework you could imagine has their own local Meetup group and the best part is they are usually free. Being part of your local development scene will not only open doors for you in terms of potential freelance and full-time opportunities but it will give you a chance to meet with local/likeminded individuals and experts of technology who are a wealth of information to your learning process. Secondly, you could attend a development conference.  These usually aren’t free but they are great way to learn about the cutting edge technologies and strategies being used.  They are usually hosted yearly and have all the major contributors in technology.  They can be a great source of inspiration and education.

Find a development mentor.

The development community is extremely friendly. Everyone is out to solve problems and having a mentor can grow your skill set very quickly. Remember: they were once in your shoes so they can understand the frustrations of staring at SublimeText for hours. Most of the developers and engineers I have had conversations with were ready, willing and able to try and help me through a development problem I was having. It is a very open and helpful community and asking questions while having them explained real-time is something that is a decided advantage over a StackOverflow or Quora.