Tag Archives: international

How to “Wow” Your Interviewer

Claudia Enriquez is a second year student receiving her Masters in Public Administration from NYU Wagner. She currently works as a Graduate Program Assistant at NYU Wasserman. She is a New Yorker at heart, growing up in Long Island, then moving to upstate New York to attend college, and now she’s back downstate and enjoying her time at NYU.

You landed the interview, now it’s time to bring out your A game and really ‘wow’ your interviewer. Follow these simple steps below and prepare to land that dream job/internship!

Research, Research, Research

Did I mention research? Check out the company’s website. Review the company’s mission statement, values, culture, goals, achievements, recent events, and the company’s products/services.  If you know anyone who works there – ask him/her to give you the inside scoop!

Practice Makes Perfect…Or at least Preparation!

Be prepared to the job interview. Practice general and challenging interview questions with your peers.  Practice in front of a mirror – don’t be shy! The more prepared you are, the more confident you’ll feel, which will come off during the interview.  While you should practice, be authentic during the actual interview.

NYU Wasserman has plenty of great career resources.  Swing by during walk-in hours for a mini mock interview, or make an appointment with a career counselor. You can find other helpful resources on CareerNet, under the Career Resources tab. Check it out!

Get Ready and Be on Time

The night before do the following:

  • Have your outfit picked out (rule of thumb: dress one or two levels up)

  • Pack your bag

  • Print out extra copies of your resume

  • Get directions to your destination (Check alternative routes)

  • Relax and have a good night’s sleep

The day of the big interview give yourself enough time to arrive. Arrive between 5-7 minutes early. If you’re too early walk around, grab some water, etc. As soon as you walk through the door, all eyes are on you – that means, be polite to everyone, from the receptionist to the person interviewing you.  Remember to put on your best smile!

How to Answer Questions During the Interview?

During the interview make eye contact and answer questions with confidence.  Use the STAR method:

  • Situation – Describe the situation you were in (e.g., the name of the internship or course you were taking)

  • Task – Identify the specific project you were working on and briefly discuss what it entailed

  • Action – This is the most important element! Specifically identify what YOUR action was related to the question that was asked

  • Result – Close the question by stating an outcome to your situation

If you ever find yourself stuck on a question, that’s okay! Say to the interviewer ‘that’s a good question, let me think about it.’ Pause, breathe, think, and then give your answer.

Ask Meaningful Questions

At the close of the interview, the interviewer will always ask if you have any questions for them.  Have about 5-10 questions prepared, but of course, don’t ask questions already answered during the interview.

Below are good examples of what to ask the interviewer.

  1. What qualities do you think are most important for someone to excel in this position?

  2. What do you personally like most about working for this company?

  3. What would be one of the greatest challenges a person in this position would face?

  4. Can you tell me more about the team I’ll be working with?

  5. What are the next steps in the interview process?

Follow Up

Send a thank you email or a letter to your interviewer(s) 24-48 hours after the interview. If you interviewed with more than one person, send tailored individual thank you notes. Reiterate your strengths and your interest in the company. This is also an opportunity to add anything you did not discuss during the interview. As always, thank them for their time and the opportunity.

Good luck!

In Case You Missed It: Day in the Life at Manna Project

Did you miss a Program Director’s Day in the Life with Manna Project International? If so, click on the logo below for a recap.

Does @mannaproject sound like a place you’d like to work. Apply now on CareerNet, Job ID: 925524 and 929737.

International Student Discussion About Internships

On Thursday, April 17, Jinyue Zhang, a Masters student in the Management and Systems program at SCPS attended a special workshop hosted by the NYU Wasserman Center @SCPS called “Succeeding in Your Internship: International Student Roundtables”.

During the event, students had an opportunity to meet with NYU-SCPS international alumni and second-year graduate students who have interned at fantastic companies. The guests were settled at one of the roundtables, and eight or nine students as a small group asked questions and learned about the background of the guests. The discussion rotated every eight minutes. Soon after the rotation started, both the students and the guests became highly focused on the discussion. And after an hour and a half of talking and laughing, everyone found they gained great insight from the guests and generated a clearer direction about their internship search.

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Here is some of the valuable advice offered forth by the special guests.

Tips about searching for the internship:

1.     Be fully prepared: “Spend 80% of your time building skills and your personal brand.” Said Mark Li (graduate degree in Integrated Marketing). Success is the accumulation of everyday effort. There are many things to do before you worry about how to network. You can sit down in the library to work on a resume that can highlight all your skills. You can read newspapers and blogs to become more familiar with the culture and job market in the US. You can also try to write a blog, or even an eBook, just to show your expertise in the specific industry.

2.     Be proactive: What’s the next thing you should do after the preparation work? Networking. That’s when you can show your knowledge, and impress people around you. Having a positive attitude is crucial. This is also important for an interview. During the interview, always remember to be confident, ask questions and be humble about learning.

3.     Take advantage of the resources: Luckily, there are plenty of resources we can use as NYU students. Search information on NYU CareerNet, make an appointment with one of the great career coaches, or join the Mentor Network. Finally, the use of LinkedIn cannot be overemphasized. Building a professional profile and participating in specific groups on LinkedIn will always help.

Tips about relationship building:

1. Don’t be afraid to ask: When you are already a part of the company, never hesitate to ask questions. This is when a new stage of networking begins. People are always glad to answer thoughtful questions. By asking questions, you’re able to have a better understanding of the corporate culture, and maybe gain more hands-on experience.

2. Dealing with culture shock: Many international students find themselves facing great differences in the working culture here. However, when you are knocking your head against the wall trying to fit into the new culture, don’t forget you have your own culture to help showcase your personality. For instance, instead of drinking coffee, Bill Yao (second-year M.S. Sports Business candidate) always makes himself a cup of tea in the office. And surprisingly, he found that people started a good conversation with him about Chinese tea.

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As a first-year international graduate student in SCPS, I found this event more interesting and helpful than any others I’ve been to. More importantly, when talking to the second-year graduate students, I can’t help but think about what my career path will be by this time next year. Looking at what others have achieved will always motivate you to work harder. If you didn’t have a chance to attend this event, don’t miss another workshop like this in the future!

Meet the Global Peers: Buenos Aires

Suzi Brown, CAS, Class of 2014

What is the best advice about NYU you have received? At NYU, it is so important to be proactive and get out there. If an opportunity comes your way and you are even the slightest bit interested, go for it. You never know what you might stumble upon. This is how I ended up being involved in Alternative Breaks. I applied to volunteer in the Dominican Republic freshmen year, not thinking I would get a spot on the trip. However, because I just went for it and gave it my all, I travelled with 11 other like-minded students and taught English at a school in the DR over my spring break. It was such an amazing experience that the following year I applied to be a site leader and lead my own group of students back there to teach. If you are willing to put yourself out there, NYU can help you find a community and foster your passions.

Why did you decide to study abroad in Buenos Aires and Madrid? I have always wanted to study abroad, so that part was a no-brainer. Argentina and Spain share a strong history, both colonial and cultural, but they are so different down to the their core. In many ways, Argentina has a European flare, and many times tries to cultivate this flare, but this country also makes a point of being unto its own, proud of it’s pre-European roots. Then we have Spain, such a strong and powerful country for so long, now fading somewhat into the global landscape. There is a lot going on politically in each country, and as a politics major, it is very interesting to see, in real time, the progression of things in this sphere (already in my time here, there have been multiple, very lively, political protests in the streets). I am so excited for this amazing opportunity to study abroad for a full year in two countries and two hemispheres. I can’t wait to improve my Spanish and learn about these cultures constructed from either side of history.

What advice would you give about searching for an internship? Cast your net wide. When applying for internships, it is important not to get so bogged down in the one idea or image you had about what your internship would look like. Apply to a variety of positions so that you may have a choice at the end, and see which companies or organizations get back to you. You might be surprised at the types of places that are interested in your resume, and you might also be surprised at the different positions you are fit for and actually enjoy. On the other hand, it may also show you what types of things you are not interested in, but knowing this is just as important. None of my internships have ever been the same, let alone in the same general field, and I have learned vital lessons from each. I’m still not sure what I want to do, but my diverse experiences have given me a taste of the kind of environment I prefer to work in and the kinds of responsibilities I want.

October Spotlight: The Global Advantage

This month is all about the global advantage! NYU offers over a dozen different international study away locations to provide you with the ultimate global experience.

To kick off the conversation about the advantages of studying away, here’s a Wassertube video spotlighting insights from our employer partners and NYU students:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xG95snSBAvg&feature=plcp

If coming to NYC for your education is a part of your global experience, then attend the international student orientation through the Office of International Students & Scholars (OISS) to make the most of your time here at NYU!