Tag Archives: internship

Student Perspective: How to Stay Productive During Thanksgiving Break

By: Claudia Enriquez

Claudia Enriquez is a second year student receiving her Masters in Public Administration from NYU Wagner. She currently works as a Graduate Program Assistant at NYU Wasserman. She is a New Yorker at heart, growing up in Long Island, then moving to upstate New York to attend college, and now she’s back downstate and enjoying her time at NYU.

Before (or after) your food coma from all of the Thanksgiving goodies, take advantage of your Thanksgiving break to start your internship search! These helpful tips will give you a head start with your internship preparation.

Research and secure your Spring or Summer 2015 internship

Don’t be disheartened if you haven’t secured a spring internship yet – there is still time! Companies are still looking for interns to fill spots so do your research and search for companies that are hiring.  Check out CareerNet and other job search engines such as idealist.org and indeed.com.

Prepare for your Summer 2015 internship by researching various options. Block off time to sit down and reflect on the type of internship opportunities you’re most interested in. Do your homework, but don’t send out applications just yet. Most employers are off during the holiday and you don’t want your application getting overlooked.

Organize Your Job Search

Keep track of the companies you research and where you send off applications. It’s important to keep yourself organized to stay on top of your job search process. Create either an excel or word document template with the information below. This will really help you when you start sending out batches of applications after break.

  • Company Name – The name of the organization
  • Contact – The point of contact at the company
  • Email/Phone Number – Point of contact information
  • Application Deadline – Last day to submit your application
  • Date Applied – When you submitted your application
  • Position Title – What position you applied/are applying for
  • Application Summary – What you submitted with your application (resume, cover letter, etc.)
  • Interview – When your interview is scheduled
  • Follow-up – Whether or not you sent a thank you email or letter after the interview
  • Status – If you were rejected, offered the job, pending, etc.

Update your resume

If you haven’t updated your resume since the start of the Fall semester or prior, take advantage of your free time now to do so! Don’t wait until you find your dream job or internship to update your resume. Keep your resume up-to-date so you’re not editing at the very last minute and continue to add your experiences along the way.

Make sure your resume stands out! Have peers look over your resume and visit a Career Coach at Wasserman when you come back from break. If you’re a graduating senior, take advantage of the Resume Book Collection!

Enjoy Thanksgiving break

Lastly, enjoy your break! Spend time with family and friends, and have a great Thanksgiving!

 

 

 

 

Sources: http://jobsearch.about.com/od/findajob/ss/How-To-Organize-Your-Job-Search_2.htm#step-heading

 

Five Things You Need to Do Before You Apply for that Spring Internship

By: Janel Abrahami

Janel AbrahamiJanel Abrahami is a May 2014 graduate of NYU Steinhardt’s Applied Psychology program. She currently serves the NBCUniversal intern population as a Campus 2 Career Assistant and a catalyst for early career development.You can find her talking about all things work on Twitter and LinkedIn

So you found the perfect spring internship and you’re ready to apply! Or are you? Read on to make sure you’ve done these five things before you hit “Submit.”

Know your stuff

A hiring manager can tell immediately if an applicant is familiar with their company or not- and this can make or break their hiring decision. Do your extensive research on the company’s background, its clients, its leaders, its revenue sources- everything that makes a company tick. Not only will you be making a more informed decision about applying to this company (are you actually that passionate about their mission statement?), you will also be able to more effectively express the value you could add to the company in your cover letter or an interview.

Optimize your resume

If you are applying for a position at a large company, chances are high that they use an Applicant Tracking System to accumulate the hundreds of resumes that they receive. These are often referred to as “black holes,” and for good reason- it can be very easy for your resume to fall through the cracks and never see the light of day (or a recruiter’s eyes). But there is hope, and it comes in the form of keyword searches. Recruiters can search through pages of resumes to find those with certain keywords (e.g. “javascript” or “affiliate marketing”). Optimize your resume by including a few keywords from the online job description that are relevant to your experience.

Polish and shine

Once the content of your resume is ATS-friendly, make sure the format is recruiter-friendly. This means one-page of relevant experience, clearly defined sections for education and skills, and appropriate contact information (no email addresses from middle school or embarrassing voice mail recordings!).

Connect the dots

I don’t need to tell you that #networking is one of the best ways to get your foot in the door, but it is something that internship applicants often fumble with. First, use LinkedIn to see if you know anyone connected to the company you’re applying to. Once you’ve found them, either message them through LinkedIn or email them personally (whichever you think would be more appropriate). Briefly tell them that you are applying for X position at Y company, and ask them if they could recommend someone for you to send your resume to. Do not ask them to forward your resume themselves- if they are willing to do this, they will offer in their reply. Once you have a contact at the company, you’re ready to…

Make it personal

….reach out to them with a brief but personalized message expressing your interest in the position. Attach your resume and cover letter, and mention your referee’s name in the first line of your email. Then, relax with the assurance that you’ve already out yourself ahead of other applicants.

Do you have your own application checklist? Is there something else you’d include here? Share with us in the comments.

About On-Campus Recruitment  

On-Campus Recruitment (OCR) is one of the many ways for NYU juniors, seniors, and graduate students to discover job and internship opportunities. Through OCR, employers come to the Wasserman Center to interview students. 

To obtain access to OCR, you must attend both a mandatory OCR Orientation and an Acing the Interview seminar (find upcoming dates and times on NYU CareerNet).

Important Spring Deadlines for On-Campus Recruitment (OCR):
  • The first resume drops for Spring OCR positions begin November 17th
  • First deadline to apply is December 2nd
  • Interviews begin January 20th(the week before classes begin)
Learn more about On-Campus Recruitment by clicking here!

Profile of a Wasserman Center Internship Grant Recipient

Aidai Tursunbekova is a Wagner School of Public Services student interning in the United Nations Office of High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States (UN-OHRLLS). As a past recipient of the Wasserman Center Internship Grant, she shares some insight into the value of applying for the Grant, and offers some tips to further your candidacy.

Best part of winning the WCIG: The Wasserman Center Internship Grant helped me to be more focused on my internship and feel less stressed about paying my bills.

Most challenging or rewarding part of your internship: UN-OHRLLS works to promote the interests of lesser developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing states. I was on the team for landlocked developing countries, and our goal was to promote trade facilitation and infrastructure development for these countries. My main area of interest is economic development, and this internship in the UN-OHRLLS gave me an opportunity to work in that field, because trade is crucial for economic development. 

Good advice for others applying for the WCIG: I would suggest that they show their interest and passion about what they do. Additionally, they should try to build good relationships with all colleagues. It is important not only for a good internship experience, but also for networking. 

Non-paying internship survival 101 tip: Think of your internship not as a work, but  as a good opportunity to learn more about your area of interest and what you want to do after graduation. Maybe you will find what you want to do for the rest of your life, or understand that it’s simply not for you. In any case, it’s an important experience!

Are you interning this semester? Whether or not you are getting paid, take Aidai’s advice on using your internship as an opportunity to learn more about your career interests. If your internship is non-paying, and at a not-for-profit organization or within an industry that does not typically pay interns (arts, entertainment, media, education), apply now for the Wasserman Center Internship Grant. Apply by Sep 30th at 11:59pm: NYU CareerNet Job ID #927342.

Student Perspective: ICAP’s Summer Internship Program

I initially applied to ICAP’s summer internship program after hearing about the company from a close friend, as well as people in related industries.

My main interest was to secure a client-facing role within a financial services organization after graduation. I wanted to work for an organization that was both innovative and imparted responsibility upon young employees; both of which I had been informed was possible at ICAP. After rotating on several desks in both Global Broking and Electronic Markets during my summer internship, I was offered and accepted a role within EBS, which is an electronic foreign exchange platform. This was a Junior Account Executive role, with responsibility for an account, as well as dealing with all of the clients’ needs from a trading perspective. Typically this involves client visits to demonstrate new trading functionality on the platform, building relationships with everyone from the manual traders on the desk, to the e-commerce teams and the billing department. Essentially, anything that the client needs or has queries about, we take care of. This ensures that the role is diverse. Each day is different.

At the beginning of the graduate program we were on a 3 week training program which covered a multitude of different financial products. This training was vital in providing the breadth and depth of knowledge across asset classes; knowledge that is becoming increasingly important where electronic platforms are operating as multi-product services. Having access to the learning material via an online portal has also been a great help, particularly when wanting to brush up on products which are emerging into my daily role and products that will be more prominent in the future. Continuous training has also been provided on softer skills, which has been very helpful in managing my personal brand.

I have been very fortunate to be given a significant amount of responsibility at a very early stage. Today, 12 months after joining the graduate scheme, I now have multiple accounts that I manage across many cities including Moscow and Amsterdam, to name a few. Being able to travel to those places is one of the aspects that I enjoy the most about my role. The variety of learning about new markets, the politics that is linked to them, and the culture of each city, is a great experience which really expands your knowledge and perspective in general. Many challenges also arise when this much responsibility is given. Firstly, managing to juggle all the tasks that need to be completed as well as maintaining relationships in multiple countries at the same time is pretty difficult; especially when you’re travelling with work to Moscow, and still dealing with queries back in London. However, this is what makes the role multi-faceted and ensures greater personal development.

ICAP is a pretty unique company. Within its umbrella there are many companies where each desk / product is exciting in different ways. Having this choice is great, as the graduate recruitment team helps to match up graduates with the personalities of each desk, to ensure a good fit. I’m glad I made the choice to join ICAP’s team; my experience has been better than I could have anticipated it would be.

To find out more about ICAP, the kind of people we’re looking for, and to apply, visit www.icapcampusrecruitment.com.

Student Perspectives: Interning in Council Member Margaret Chin’s office

by Jessica Chen

What made this summer the best summer? Was it my weeklong vacation in California or my weekend adventures outside of New York City? Nope; this summer was the best because of all the time I spent in my favorite city, New York. Interning in Council Member Margaret Chin’s office allowed me to explore Lower Manhattan and gained a unique experience that I would otherwise not have.

As an intern for Council Member Chin, I was able to travel between City Hall, 250 Broadway (the Legislative Office), and her District Office multiple times a day.  District One is the best; everything is within walking distance!

As an intern, I learned firsthand about the work the in City Hall as well as the district office. I really enjoyed going to City Council meetings; from listening in on conversations between the council members to hearing testimony from advocates and the general public, this internship really showed me how city government works.  One of my favorite things to do in City Hall was to be in the room during a stated meeting, which is when city bills are voted on.  Because I was in the room when a bill was passed, I felt like I was experiencing a piece of City history.

Most of my time was spent at the District Office, working under the guidance of the fulltime staff. I learned so much about the district and the city as a whole. Through working with constituents, I learned about the different problems people in the district faced, such as housing, immigration, and even education issues. Not only did I learn about these issues, I learned how to deal with them as well.

Working with constituents really helped me improve my communication skills. Watching the staff members ask questions about a case made me realize that I had to dig deeper in order to get all the facts. Sometimes when constituents would describe their case and I didn’t know how to respond, Xiaomin, Linda, Patricia and even our new staffers Vincent and Yong would fill in with an appropriate response. In moments like these I am reminded that as an intern, I have so much more to learn, and am grateful to have the opportunity to do so.

Working with constituents and on special intern projects, I’ve learned so much through firsthand experience. I know so much more about issues faced by the City’s residents as well as the policies and proposals used to address them. After working for Council Member Chin’s office this past summer I feel like more of a New Yorker than I’ve ever been.  I highly recommend interning at Council Member Chin’s office. It’s a great learning experience and has truly opened my eyes to the inner workings of city government.

Sound like a place you’d like to work? Apply for their openings on CareerNet: Job ID 942467

Student Perspectives: The 5 “Do’s” at the NYU Career Fair

Aziza Sultan is a current NYU student in a joint CAS/GSAS program. She is studying politics for her Bachelor’s degree and concentrating on political economy for her Master’s.

Do Dress the Part

When you go to a career fair, it is the beginning of a conversation that you are going to be having with a potential internship or employment opportunity. This first impression is important and it’s crucial that you put forward that you are professional. It’s imperative to take care of your appearance because you can easily prepare to look professional, to ensure that you aren’t judged on that, but rather on the rest of your package. Don’t let something you can easily control be a reason a firm you want to work for doubts you.

Do Have Copies of Your Resume Available (and a 30/60 Second Run Through Prepared)

Always have double the resumes you think you’ll need on hand. Have them out, and readily available to give to recruiters.

The nature of the career fair is that certain tables will have more of a line than others. It’s important to be able to distinguish which are the more competitive tables to navigate and which are easier to access. Ones that are easier to access will give you more ability to engage in more detailed conversation, so for those tables you can speak to the recruiter or people at that table for a longer period of time. Other tables will have more interested students. Thus, it’s important to have two types of “walk-throughs” of your resume and overall package. For shorter conversations, a 30 second presentment of yourself will do, while longer conversations can be up to around 60 seconds before a back and forth short question and answer.

Seek to Speak to Employers of Interest First

The nature of the career fair is that time is limited, so make sure that you go to tables you know you are interested in first, and save companies you want to explore for later.

Part of this strategy is going to be having done prior research on firms that will be present at the fair. A useful application to download is “NYU Career Fair Plus” on your Android or iPhone. It will have a list of all employers who are going to be at the fair. If you want to be prepared and hit the ground running, download the application and learn in depth about every single firm you’re interested in that will be present.

Do Be Yourself

Don’t try to fit into a bubble of what you expect the recruiter will like. Recruiters are people, not robots who just sort between good fits and bad fits for positions. Be confident and know that it is part of the recruiter’s goal to find smart, competent and easy to work with people to work for their firm (given that they are otherwise good fits for the position).  I’ve seen people be incredibly aggressive with recruiters to prove that they are go-getters. That’s not a good way to be, because no one wants to work with people who are abrasive as a means of showing their competence or ability to do well.

Do Only Go After Positions That are Genuinely of Interest to You

I say this because I really think people waste time and energy going after internships and employment they don’t really care to have. This is not only a waste of your own resources but of many people’s. It’s obvious to a potential employer when you are going after something only because you think it will be glamorous, pays well, or is what your friends are doing. At the end of the day, you’ll have to step into and out of an office every single day for the duration of your internship or employment. Where you work, whether you want to work there, and whether or not it’s a good fit for you will impact every part of your life – so make an educated choice. Know the firm and the work you will be doing, know yourself and seek to add the most value to both.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO ATTEND THE FALL JOB & INTERNSHIP FAIR. RSVP THROUGH NYU CAREERNET BY CLICKING HERE!

International Student Discussion About Internships

On Thursday, April 17, Jinyue Zhang, a Masters student in the Management and Systems program at SCPS attended a special workshop hosted by the NYU Wasserman Center @SCPS called “Succeeding in Your Internship: International Student Roundtables”.

During the event, students had an opportunity to meet with NYU-SCPS international alumni and second-year graduate students who have interned at fantastic companies. The guests were settled at one of the roundtables, and eight or nine students as a small group asked questions and learned about the background of the guests. The discussion rotated every eight minutes. Soon after the rotation started, both the students and the guests became highly focused on the discussion. And after an hour and a half of talking and laughing, everyone found they gained great insight from the guests and generated a clearer direction about their internship search.

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Here is some of the valuable advice offered forth by the special guests.

Tips about searching for the internship:

1.     Be fully prepared: “Spend 80% of your time building skills and your personal brand.” Said Mark Li (graduate degree in Integrated Marketing). Success is the accumulation of everyday effort. There are many things to do before you worry about how to network. You can sit down in the library to work on a resume that can highlight all your skills. You can read newspapers and blogs to become more familiar with the culture and job market in the US. You can also try to write a blog, or even an eBook, just to show your expertise in the specific industry.

2.     Be proactive: What’s the next thing you should do after the preparation work? Networking. That’s when you can show your knowledge, and impress people around you. Having a positive attitude is crucial. This is also important for an interview. During the interview, always remember to be confident, ask questions and be humble about learning.

3.     Take advantage of the resources: Luckily, there are plenty of resources we can use as NYU students. Search information on NYU CareerNet, make an appointment with one of the great career coaches, or join the Mentor Network. Finally, the use of LinkedIn cannot be overemphasized. Building a professional profile and participating in specific groups on LinkedIn will always help.

Tips about relationship building:

1. Don’t be afraid to ask: When you are already a part of the company, never hesitate to ask questions. This is when a new stage of networking begins. People are always glad to answer thoughtful questions. By asking questions, you’re able to have a better understanding of the corporate culture, and maybe gain more hands-on experience.

2. Dealing with culture shock: Many international students find themselves facing great differences in the working culture here. However, when you are knocking your head against the wall trying to fit into the new culture, don’t forget you have your own culture to help showcase your personality. For instance, instead of drinking coffee, Bill Yao (second-year M.S. Sports Business candidate) always makes himself a cup of tea in the office. And surprisingly, he found that people started a good conversation with him about Chinese tea.

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As a first-year international graduate student in SCPS, I found this event more interesting and helpful than any others I’ve been to. More importantly, when talking to the second-year graduate students, I can’t help but think about what my career path will be by this time next year. Looking at what others have achieved will always motivate you to work harder. If you didn’t have a chance to attend this event, don’t miss another workshop like this in the future!

A Peek Inside Mashable

David Chen, a first-year Film and Physics student, attended last week’s Welcome Week site visit to Mashable. Below is his account of the visit and the “mashed” tech and journalism outlet that is “the next evolution of tech media”:

Everybody knows The New York Times. It is a Goliath of an organization – with almost 8,000 employees producing approx. 900,000 issues a day that are consumed by many Americans: it is a news force that only a few can rival.

But many also know Mashable. In fact, they are ‘liked’ by 3.4 million Facebook and Google Plus users, followed by almost 3.5 million Twitter users, and attract countless views on their homepage everyday from all over the world. Using the connectivity and networking of the Internet, Mashable has grown into an influential ‘frontpage’ of the news world. In just eight years, it has attracted virtually 8 times the readership of the NYT. But compared to the Times, Mashable is a diminutive David; its total employment numbers just 115.

As a student interested in journalism and multimedia, I jumped at the opportunity to tour its headquarters organized by the staff at The Wasserman Center.

How does such a small company amass such an incredible readership? What makes Mashable different and why does it work?

Stepping into the Mashable headquarters on Park Avenue, I immediately sensed something was very wrong. The cutest dog I’ve ever seen was rolling on the carpeted floor playing with its kibbles, begging for belly rubs. Blue jeans, attractive hairstyles, and Boho fashion dotted the room. No cubicles. Macs and PCs living in coexistence. This office has a personality.

Kamilla greeted our group at the door. Her immediate hospitality, candid answers, and frequent reference and praise to her colleagues created an aura that Mashable wasn’t a company composed of individual entities, but an eccentric family dedicated to constantly evolve the company into something greater. Its collective and collaborative infrastructure allows an open forum for fresh ideas to be discussed, suggested by both the most senior employee to the greenest intern. Mashable is company where the person sitting next to you is not just a co-worker, but a friend who admires your work and values your contributions.

This unique work model breaks from the traditional bureaucracy of large news companies where hierarchy and obedience is imperative. Its open nature combined with its extensive online presence allows for an immediate, fast, and reactive handle over various news sources – it’s maneuverable. While Mashable continues to grow at an exponential pace, far larger corporate media companies are scrambling to replace the dying print form with a fresh online presence, copying many techniques that close knit startups, such as Mashable, have pioneered. Already it seems that Mashable is the next evolution of news media.

For more information, give Mashable a Twitter follow: @Mashable

In case you missed it: Day in the Life at City Year

Did you miss Andrew’s day as an Operations Intern at City Year? Catch up with his day by clicking the logo below.

If you are interested in the @CityYearNewYork internship program check out the Career Net link here.

In case you missed it: Day in the life ZogSports

Did you miss Alison and Sara tweet about their day as a Marketing Interns at ZogSports? Catch up with their day by clicking the logo below.

If this sounds like somewhere you would want to work, apply for an Operations Intern at ZogSports! To apply click here! (Or apply on NYU CareerNet Job ID: 900993.

For more Days in the Life, follow us @NYUWassEmployer! And for more career related information, follow us @NYUWasserman!