Tag Archives: interview

Starting your Job Search? Better Get Ready For Your Close-Up!

By  Nicole Tucker, Tech Recruiter at iCIMS

As a recruiter, I’m constantly reviewing resumes, phone screening candidates, and setting up interviews to find the best talent for iCIMS. With so many applicants for each position, it’s challenging to identify the soft skills needed for each unique job to ensure that the candidate is a great match for the position. On the other hand, when I’m on campus for recruitment events, students ask me “what can I do to land the job that’s right for me?” The good news is, thanks to the latest recruitment technology, there’s a tool that helps recruiters find top talent quickly and easily, and gives candidates the opportunity to stand out during their job search. It’s all in the power of video.

iCIMS and other employers have implemented video capabilities as part of their interview process. This means, candidates are given an opportunity to record a short video explaining why they are the best person for the job. Think about it, by submitting a video in addition to your resume, the recruiter will be able to see you, hear your communication style, and assess your professionalism, which can make you stand out from the crowd. With all this information regarding your candidacy, you have a much better chance of getting noticed and being invited to interview for your dream job. According to Recruiting.com, “the information retained from one minute of online video is equal to about 1.8 million written words.” In an age where the average job receives 250 resumes, having that kind of edge is crucial.

Why Video is the Answer 

It gets you in front of the recruiter — no matter how far away you are from the job. The end goal is an interview, but the logistics of scheduling 30 minute interviews for every candidate can limit your chances of making it onto the schedule. Video is your chance to use one or two minutes to persuade your future boss why you are the right person for the position.

You can “prove” your ability by simulating a real world experience. Say you want to land that big sales job, but you’ve only worked at one other company. In two minutes, you can prove what the resume doesn’t show by giving a sales pitch. Recruiters can quickly see your ability and potential.

How to Make the Perfect Video 

Dress the part – The video is your first impression to your potential employer, so treat it like an interview by wearing your professional attire.

Practice makes perfect – Your video should showcase your presentation skills, so don’t rush through the experience. Record a few versions until you feel your message is clear and you appear confident and comfortable in your video.

Keep it short and simple – Don’t experiment with special effect and graphics, unless you’re an expert. Keep the video under two minutes to keep the recruiters attention throughout its entirety.

We all get a little anxious when it comes to recording ourselves on video. It’s hard enough to pick the right LinkedIn photo — let alone record a composed, well-spoken video as part of the application process. However, the payoff can be huge — video is a great opportunity to stand out and it could give you the edge you need to land your dream job. My advice? Start preparing for your close-up now!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO MEET WITH iCIMS, STOP BY THEIR BOOTH AT THE ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY CAREER FAIR. RSVP THROUGH NYU CAREERNET BY CLICKING HERE!

International Student Discussion About Internships

On Thursday, April 17, Jinyue Zhang, a Masters student in the Management and Systems program at SCPS attended a special workshop hosted by the NYU Wasserman Center @SCPS called “Succeeding in Your Internship: International Student Roundtables”.

During the event, students had an opportunity to meet with NYU-SCPS international alumni and second-year graduate students who have interned at fantastic companies. The guests were settled at one of the roundtables, and eight or nine students as a small group asked questions and learned about the background of the guests. The discussion rotated every eight minutes. Soon after the rotation started, both the students and the guests became highly focused on the discussion. And after an hour and a half of talking and laughing, everyone found they gained great insight from the guests and generated a clearer direction about their internship search.

1.JPG

Here is some of the valuable advice offered forth by the special guests.

Tips about searching for the internship:

1.     Be fully prepared: “Spend 80% of your time building skills and your personal brand.” Said Mark Li (graduate degree in Integrated Marketing). Success is the accumulation of everyday effort. There are many things to do before you worry about how to network. You can sit down in the library to work on a resume that can highlight all your skills. You can read newspapers and blogs to become more familiar with the culture and job market in the US. You can also try to write a blog, or even an eBook, just to show your expertise in the specific industry.

2.     Be proactive: What’s the next thing you should do after the preparation work? Networking. That’s when you can show your knowledge, and impress people around you. Having a positive attitude is crucial. This is also important for an interview. During the interview, always remember to be confident, ask questions and be humble about learning.

3.     Take advantage of the resources: Luckily, there are plenty of resources we can use as NYU students. Search information on NYU CareerNet, make an appointment with one of the great career coaches, or join the Mentor Network. Finally, the use of LinkedIn cannot be overemphasized. Building a professional profile and participating in specific groups on LinkedIn will always help.

Tips about relationship building:

1. Don’t be afraid to ask: When you are already a part of the company, never hesitate to ask questions. This is when a new stage of networking begins. People are always glad to answer thoughtful questions. By asking questions, you’re able to have a better understanding of the corporate culture, and maybe gain more hands-on experience.

2. Dealing with culture shock: Many international students find themselves facing great differences in the working culture here. However, when you are knocking your head against the wall trying to fit into the new culture, don’t forget you have your own culture to help showcase your personality. For instance, instead of drinking coffee, Bill Yao (second-year M.S. Sports Business candidate) always makes himself a cup of tea in the office. And surprisingly, he found that people started a good conversation with him about Chinese tea.

2.jpg

As a first-year international graduate student in SCPS, I found this event more interesting and helpful than any others I’ve been to. More importantly, when talking to the second-year graduate students, I can’t help but think about what my career path will be by this time next year. Looking at what others have achieved will always motivate you to work harder. If you didn’t have a chance to attend this event, don’t miss another workshop like this in the future!

Startup Thoughts and Considerations by 9th Dot

9th Dot is a consumer insight platform that gives individuals a “blank canvas” through which they can share their innovative ideas for improvements with businesses, and  rewards consumers for successfully doing so.  From the businesses’ perspective, they receive insightful information in the form of answers to questions they often don’t even know to ask. Last week, they offered up some advice for the interviewing process. Today, they share what to consider when starting your own business.

So you’re ready to take the plunge?  You’ve got a great idea for a product or service that solves a problem with a huge market size, you’re well underway with developing the technology and have written more code than you ever thought possible, you’re already crafting your go to market strategy and you’ve thought through a business model that will scale seamlessly as your startup grows like a weed.  Think again, and again after that.

Starting your own business is one of the most gratifying things a person can do. Take it from us, we thought careers in banking were exactly what we wanted until we had a taste of what entrepreneurship had to offer.  From seeing your app published in the app store to hearing your first potential customer express interest in your product, starting a business will give you countless ups, but also plenty of downs.

The advice we never received, well, maybe we never sought out, is what exactly to expect before starting a company.  Hindsight, 20/20 as it may be, will never provide all the answers, but it’s certainly given us some perspective that we’d like to share with other budding entrepreneurs.

With that in mind, we asked ourselves, what would have been most helpful for us before we started out?

First, for any milestone you set or any hurdle you want to cross in which you think things will become easier, guess again.  For all the progress we’ve made, from writing the business plan, developing the technology, getting covered in TechCrunch, receiving a formal offer to join an accelerator program, and delivering our first demo to a customer, we’ve continued to learn one thing – it doesn’t get easier.  No matter what your strategy for building your business, whether it be widespread user adoption, monetization from corporate clients, or a combination of both, be prepared for a long slog ahead with progress likely to come at a rate slower than you expect.

The reality is that it takes time to build a business.  Viral marketing, hair on fire problem solving and growth hacking are all great buzz phrases, but none will be your cure all panacea as you look to build awareness of your startup and the problems it solves.  Be creative in your go to market strategy.  Ask friends and family what they think – they’ll likely give you feedback that will lead you to think and rethink ways in which you position your product in the marketplace.

Talk to your co-founders and then talk to them again.  Communication and candor is paramount.  As most investors will tell you, the number one reason startups fail is due to differences in opinions that co-founders are unable to reconcile.  Founders agreements and incorporation papers are a great start, but nothing takes the place of addressing key questions early on:

– Do all of the co-founders share similar risk appetites?  The idea of launching a startup is appealing to everyone, but tolerable by few.  Make sure from the get go that everyone is prepared to give your startup the time and attention necessary to succeed before doing anything else

-Do all of the co-founders have the financial cushion necessary to give it a shot? No matter how much progress you make, and how quickly you make it, you’re a long way from being comfortable.  Assuming you all have the patience to remain uncomfortable for a while, make sure everyone is prepared to forego a meaningful income for a while.

– Be prepared to change and change often.  Pivoting is another one of those buzzwords in the startup industry, but it’s much simpler than that.  While plenty of companies do truly pivot, in many cases more than once, we learned to simply not commit to anything other than having a clear vision to experiment and experiment often.  We thought we had it figured out – our idea solves a major problem, a problem we vetted across several major VCs by sharing our business plan before embarking on our journey.  We thought, “let’s get a little bit of media coverage and run some campaigns over Facebook and Twitter and we’ll be off to the races” – were we ever mistaken.  Dampen your expectations and then dampen them again.  Building a business and a brand takes time, endless amounts of energy, and above all a passion to see your idea grow into a business. Regardless of how good you think your go to market strategy is, think of as many ideas for building awareness for your product or service as you can, you’ll test them all and then think of some more.

Above all, don’t launch your startup because it’s cool to say you launched a startup or because you want to make a lot of money – neither of these reasons are likely to lead to success.  Start a business because you see a solution to a problem that will only seem obvious after you’ve exhaustively told your story to customers and investors, and likely the rest of the World.  We started 9th Dot, a crowdsourcing consumer insight platform, because we saw a tremendous opportunity to create a “win-win” situation for both consumers and businesses. Creating a platform that enables consumers to deliver insightful solutions to businesses and rewards them for doing so made a lot of sense to us, but it was the realization that we couldn’t live with ourselves if we did not that made us decide to slog it out.  As we were told by one VC investor early on, “Remember, entrepreneurs are mostly irrational, driven by a passion for creating something where there was nothing and realizing a vision they couldn’t ignore. It’s like jumping off a cliff and having to build a plane before you hit the ground!”

Innovative Interviewing Tips from 9th Dot

9th Dot is a consumer insight platform that gives individuals a “blank canvas” through which they can share their innovative ideas for improvements with businesses, and  rewards consumers for successfully doing so.  From the businesses’ perspective, they receive insightful information in the form of answers to questions they often don’t even know to ask. Here, they offer up some advice for the interviewing process.
Demonstrate an Approach to Problem-Solving

With such a competitive dynamic in today’s job market, individuals often try to do anything they can to gain an edge and differentiate themselves from other candidates. Interviewers want to be convinced you will be able to solve tough problems and help the corporation achieve its objectives.  Demonstrating your ability to think critically and provide innovative solutions to problems is a skill that can help you both secure the job during the interview, as well as climb the corporate ladder after you’ve landed the job.

It’s widely known that one of the best ways to answer interview questions is to make reference to situational experiences in which you successfully solved a problem.  Success stories tend to be tales of the defining moments in one’s career when an individual overcame significant challenges to succeed. These stories create a memorable impression and give the interviewer anecdotes about you that identify your ability to think creatively, solve complex problems and provide a solution.

While many experts suggest relating interview questions to similar situations from earlier in one’s career to demonstrate specific experience in dealing with similar situations, this can prove challenging for students preparing to enter the job market for the first time.  As we all know, challenges also tend to present opportunities.  When preparing for an interview, think of where you use or have used the company’s products or services.  Think about the context in which you used a product or service and ask yourself “what could have made that experience even better?”  Chances are that you’ve had several occasions like this where the proverbial “light bulb” went off in your head as to what would have made your experience better.  With the rise of crowdsourcing, businesses have quickly realized the value that can be derived from the consumers of their products and services – so much so that many large corporations have built full scale social media, consumer insight and guest experience teams to learn from and incorporate their customers’ innovative ideas for improving their products or services.

For instance, while preparing for a job at the corporate office of McDonald’s or Starbucks one may consider addressing an interview question centered around problem solving or critical thinking by drawing on an experience in which you observed an opportunity to improve something and exactly what your solution would entail.  Starbucks, through its MyStarbucksIdea platform, solicits and reviews ideas from its customers and has implemented just over 300 ideas over the last five years.  Things like WiFi, splash sticks and cake pops all originated through their crowdsourcing platform.  McDonald’s recently began testing third drive-thru windows after its social media team picked up a tweet from one customer who decided to share his idea over Twitter by saying, “I hate waiting in line for 20 minutes during the lunch rush at McDonald’s when all I want is a simple McFlurry.  Why doesn’t McDonald’s have a third drive-thru window for express orders?”  Innovative ideas like these gain the attention from senior leadership throughout an organization.

Companies like 9th Dot, a crowdsourcing consumer insight platform, are gaining traction by serving as the connection point between consumers and businesses.  By providing consumers with a “blank canvas” through which they can share their innovative ideas, and potentially earn rewards, 9th Dot enables consumers to showcase their bright ideas to businesses.  Having the right portal through which you can share your idea effectively gives you the podium in front of a large lecture hall filled with businesses wanting to learn what they can do better.

Consider that the next time an interviewer asks you to describe the last time you’ve solved a problem and how you went about doing so!

 

Management Consulting Case Interviews

Cracking The Case

Tips For Case Interviews From the Other Side of the Table

Here at Argopoint, like other consulting firms, we often use case study interviews to evaluate potential applicants. These interviews are commonly a source of anxiety for undergraduates and other first-time interviewees, but they don’t have to be. Our founder, Jason Winmill, has 20 years of experience in the management and strategy consulting field, and has run thousands of case interviews with top candidates from schools including Harvard Business School, Wharton, and Yale. Here are some tips for prospective applicants gathered from years of experience on both sides of the process:

“Plans are only good intentions unless they immediately degenerate into hard work.”

— Peter F. Drucker, Leading 20th Century Management Thinker

Pay attention to the interviewer

You might be talking to a senior or junior member of the company. They might be warm and talkative or reserved and direct. Some interviewers enjoy the process, while others don’t…and sometimes your interviewer might just be having a bad day.

Suggestion: Get a read on your interviewer. Observe the behavior and attitude of the interviewer and act appropriately. Whether they want to chat for a bit or get right down to business, follow their lead. In addition, the information that an interviewer gives you is meant to help you, so pay attention and use their cues to your own benefit.

It’s about more than just the math

Too many first-time interviewees spend time worrying about doing the math correctly to the exclusion of other important factors. Keep in mind that you’re being evaluated on a comprehensive basis, including your critical thinking skills, your analytical capabilities, and your ability to solve problems.  While quantitative prowess is important to being a consultant, this capability doesn’t go very far if you do not know how to apply it in a business setting.

Suggestion: Be sure to demonstrate to your interviewer that you can not only find solutions to mathematical problems, but that you can also use your findings to quickly form opinions and guide decisions. In addition, make sure you spend time demonstrating more than just your quantitative capabilities.

Demonstrate enthusiasm and keen interest in the conversation

In a case interview you are presented with business problems, similar to those actual consultants are faced with.  This is an opportunity to demonstrate to the interviewer that you can both can handle consulting work, and that you find it interesting. A good consultant will find the work enjoyable and intellectually stimulating.

Suggestions: Demonstrate enthusiasm and energy in your conversation with the interviewer. This will demonstrate your passion for the industry.

Focus on the bigger business problems present

You are not expected to be an expert on every industry. Don’t be concerned if you do not know the specifics of the industry that you are questioned about. What is important is your understanding of business and your ability to solve business issues.

Suggestion: Focus on the bigger problems that can be generalized across industries to all businesses. Examples include declining profitability, merger integration, increasing market share, etc.

Structure the problem to help to brainstorm your own solution, but don’t force fit any frameworks

Most firms and professionals recommend applying a pre-existing framework to the scenario at hand. This will structure the problem making it clearer, to both you and the interviewer, how you are thinking about the problem. However, be weary of a strict compliance to these frameworks. Applying one to a situation that it doesn’t fit with is a large mistake you should try and avoid. This mistake implies a misunderstanding of the fundamental problems and thus a flawed way of addressing them and coming to a solution.

Suggestions: Study or review various business frameworks such as Porter’s 5 Forces and a traditional microeconomic cost structure. In addition, read publications such as The Economist and The Wall Street Journal to become familiar with actual business problems and solutions, as well as descriptions of various industries.

Don’t over complicate things

You need not focus on all the information presented to you. While it’s not a bad thing to see potential hours’ worth of issues, as it shows you can think deeply about a problem, focusing on all of them will waste your time without getting you any closer to an answer.

Suggestion: Prioritize and focus on key information, not all the information. As soon as you have a sense of the most important factors in a case, shift your attention to those aspects. Ask questions about the core issues that you have identified.     

Ask (smart) questions

A consideration of the interviewer will be identifying how you act when faced with an ambiguous situation. Consequentially asking too many questions will portray that you don’t respond well. On the contrary, interviewers expect you to ask some questions, but they should be relevant and important to the issue at hand and your proposed solution.

Suggestion: Demonstrate leadership ability and initiative by focusing on questions that help you in connecting the information, but not that aid you in creating a complete picture. This will show that you can solve problems in a less structured environment and possess creativity. 

Communicate your thought process clearly

One of the most important parts of the interview is assessing your problem solving, analytical and critical thinking skills. To demonstrate that you possess these qualities, make sure to communicate your thought process clearly to the interviewer when coming to a solution.

Suggestion: Be thorough in walking the interviewer through your complete thought process. Explain why you come to each assumption that you do and why the questions you are asking him or her are relevant to the scenario presented.    

Don’t be afraid to think outside the box

If there were simple solutions to the problems that consultants address, then there would be no consulting industry, as businesses would be able to solve their own business problems. When businesses approach consulting firms they are looking for innovative and creative solutions.

Suggestion: In developing creative solutions, be sure to always stick to common sense and business acumen.  

Demonstrate a dedicated interest in the firm you are interviewing at

Remember that the interview is a good place for you to learn more about the firm, as well as where the firm learns more about you. Use the opportunity wisely and make keep the interview interactive so you can learn more about your interviewer and gain insight into their thought processes and daily work.

Suggestion: Be yourself and display your interest in the firm by making the interview as interactive as possible.

Above all, relax and enjoy the experience. Your interviewers are looking for the skills and traits that will genuinely lead to your success in the position—they want you to succeed. The best applicants are excited by the challenges available in the consulting field, so try to think of your case interview as an enjoyable new challenge and an opportunity to learn more about the company you’re interviewing with. Good luck!

Jason Winmill is the managing partner at Argopoint LLC and has over 20 years of management and strategy consulting experience.  Jason has advised senior executives (including general counsels) across a range of industries including healthcare, pharmaceuticals, retail, consumer products, financial services/insurance and utilities.

Jason served as the “outside architect”—assisting in the design of an outside counsel rationalization and partnering program for one of the country’s top ten largest legal divisions.   His work for this client and other in-house legal groups has resulted in a portfolio of more qualified outside counsel (as measured by a reasoned assessment of objective markers) and significantly lower costs for legal services. He worked to improve efforts involving litigation, intellectual property (patents and trademarks, among others), human resources, real estate, mergers and acquisitions, government investigations and regulatory law.  Jason’s work has been featured in publications such as the Wall Street Journal, Corporate Counsel Magazine, the ACC Docket, The American Lawyer, Inside Litigation, Purchasing Magazine and Inside Supply Management.

Jason has held positions at Bain & Co—a leading strategy consulting firm and at Goodmeasure Consulting, a leading organizational change consulting firm headed by Harvard Business School faculty, a former editor of the Harvard Business Review and leader of the Harvard Business School’s general management faculty.

Jason is an honors graduate of Harvard College.  He received an MBA from the Harvard Business School, where he was elected to lead the school’s Forum on Business Ethics.

 

Develop A Personal Website To Land A Dream Job

Are you preparing for an interview at a marketing firm, talent agency, communications bureau, or advertising agency? Are you curious about how to prepare yourself for the “creative professions”?

Apart from attending Acing the Interview for Creative Professionals on Thursday, November 7, at 12:30pm at The Wasserman Center (Presentation Room A), check out our guest blog post from Wix.com’s Ariele Krantzow on how to supplement that dazzling interview with a stunning web presence!

So, you want to land the perfect job or internship, but there are 100s of people applying for the same positions. Ask yourself: How can I stand out from the masses? A website of course! Wait, you don’t know how to code? No worries, here are some tips to building a killer personal website, no code needed.

1. Write a personal statement. How are you different from the 1000s of other recent grads out there? What do you really want to do? Maybe even make it into a video!

2. Use a professional photo. No, not that photo of you from last week’s party. Have good light, make sure your hair is neat, wear a nice top, look at the camera, and snap.

3. Go to Wix.com and create a FREE account. Choose one of the 100% customizable, no-code-necessary templates, and GO!

4. Connect your professional social media channels to your site using the many integration tools available.

5. Showcase your resume on the site using the Instant Resume app. Don’t forget to add a downloadable version of it as well.

Happy Happy Building!*

*If you ever need help with your online presence you can always head over to the NY Wix office (Wixlounge.com) and sign up for a free in-person support session.

About Ariele:

Ariele Krantzow is the Training and Support Manager for Wix.com. With a graphic design background, she teaches a series of classes to local small business owners, creative, and university students ranging from how to build a Wix website to marketing your business online. If you can’t find Ariele at the NY Wix Lounge, make sure to check out the other Wix offices around the world!

Attend Acing the Interview for Creative Professionals on Thursday, November 7, at 12:30pm at The Wasserman Center (Presentation Room A)! Get industry-specific insight on the different components to interviewing for creative positions.

Attire for Successful Hire

You’ve heard it before: you only get one chance to make a good first impression, dress for success, dress for the job you want not the one you have. Here at the NYU Wasserman Center, we cannot emphasize enough the importance to dress professionally for your interview. Business formal is essential for interviews and company presentations.

Regardless of the work environment, interviews are professional meetings. Professional attire not only supports your appearance, but also demonstrates that you take the interview process seriously and it compliments the person interviewing you. Employers do take notice of your attire and it does factor in to your overall performance. For ideas and inspiration of professional attire, please visit the NYU Wasserman “Dress for Success” Pinterest pages.

For Him:

  • Suit: A suit looks polished and makes you look professional. To avoid looking sloppy, make sure your suit is tailored. The proper fit is key!
  • Tie: A tie pulls your outfit together while allowing you to express some personality.
  • Socks: Wear dark dress socks, no athletic socks. Mid-calf length is best for interviews so when you sit no skin is visible.
  • Shoes: Dress shoes. Shoes should be cleaned and polished so you are ready to shine.

For Her:

  • Suit: Women should wear a pants suit, a skirt, or a business formal dress. Make sure that your outfit isn’t too snug or that your pants aren’t too long. Skirt or dress should be at knee length.
  • Shirt: Blouses or button down shirts should be solid in color. Patterns can be busy and distracting during an interview. If you choose to wear all black, try to add a pop of color to add some personality.
  • Hosiery: Hosiery should always be worn on an interview. Try to stick to black or nude and avoid prints.
  • Shoes: Closed toed shoes are most professional for an interview. Avoid extreme styles or heights. Also, make sure that you are able to walk comfortably in your shoes!

Grooming and Finishing Touches:

  • Hair: Should be clean, combed and neat
  • Hands: Make sure you have clean hands, especially during the flu season!
  • Smell: Use perfume and/or cologne modestly.
  • Portfolio: Always have on you a professional portfolio. Backpacks and briefcases are bulky.

Mirror Check:

Try on your outfit before hand to ensure everything fits properly, looks neat, and, most importantly, looks professional.

Join us at the NYU Wasserman for Attire for Successful Hire
February 5th, 2013 | 5 PM to 7 PM| Sponsored by our Peers in Careers

Don’t let the wrong outfit cost you the job! Join our Peers in Careers and representatives from Macy’s as they offer fashion advice and showcase professional clothing trends. Learn to decode terms like “business casual,” and figure out how to add flair to your professional wardrobe. First 50 attendees will receive a Macy’s gift bag. All attendees will be entered into a FREE raffle. Free food and drinks!

RSVP through your NYU CareerNet account.

Interview Cancellations

Although there are sometimes extenuating circumstances, in the professional world it is never a good idea to cancel an interview, or worse, miss an interview.

The world is a small place, and word spreads quickly if a candidate cancels or misses an interview. It burns bridges with not only the company you were intending to interview with, but  also with other potential employers as well.

At the Wasserman Center, we work hard to build relationships with employers and professionals. It becomes difficult to maintain such relationships when candidates miss interviews. It reflects poorly on the university as a whole and creates a bad report that candidates do not take the interview process seriously.

If you must cancel an interview, you should make sure to give us at least four business days notice. This allows the employer to find another candidate as a replacement or allows them to free their schedule so that they are not wasting their time. In the professional world, time is extremely valuable. Oftentimes employers are flexible and willing to reschedule, the chances of rescheduling your interview are much better if you notify the staff ahead of time.

If you are no longer sure about your interest in company, do not sign up for an interview for the sake of signing up for an interview. While its good practice to take advantage of every opportunity, it also shows focus and diligence to identify a position or company you don’t feel fit for. Only sign up for interviews with companies that you are genuinely interested in working for. The company you may not be so interested in may be another candidates dream job.

If an unexpected situation arises, notify the employer or recruitment staff as soon as possible. Do not wait until after your interview was scheduled to address your absence. Please keep in mind, while some employers are flexible and understanding, other employers feel insulted.

If you ever feel you need help on how to maneuver the recruitment process or whether you feel fit for an interview, we encourage you to schedule an appointment through your NYU CareerNet with a career counselor. They will be able to answer any of your questions and give you advice on the interview process.