Tag Archives: job search

Employer Insights: What to Look for When You’re Looking

By Lisa Ganz

When I graduated from Vanderbilt in May 2013, I took a job in finance. It was a job I had basically signed on the dotted line for two years before when I was just 20 years old and received an internship offer at that company. The summer internship program was a feeder into a full-time job, and I was grateful to be gainfully employed 18 months before I was due to graduate. At the time, I remember thinking, “Wow, how could I turn this great opportunity down? What more could I ask for?”

When I found myself unhappy after a few months at that job and began actively looking for a new role, I had a much clearer understanding of what I wanted and went about my job search process in totally different way than I had a few years earlier. This time around, I was looking to jumpstart my career I wasn’t just looking for a job and looking for the following things helped me find that at AlphaSights.

1. A company that is disrupting an industry. It’s exciting to work for a company that is impacting human progress and has a unique business model that is different from any of its competitors. Every day at AlphaSights, I feel like I’m a part of something that is going to be huge, and the work I do empowers me.

2. People you want to work with. Work for a company that employs people you respect and who respect you, and one where you’ll be surrounded by people who challenge you to think. At AlphaSights, you build genuine relationships beyond just colleagues and it makes every day fun.

3. The company puts its people, not its bottom line, first. Happy employees lead to greater productivity and retention, which inadvertently leads to greater profit! So many companies I’ve worked for have lost sight of this simple fact. A paycheck can only go so far; look for a company where the leaders genuinely care about their employees’ wellbeing.

4. It fits your personality. Taking a job is a lot about fit. An employee sinking or swimming is often directly connected to whether the company is the right place for them. What is the office environment? Is it rara and collaborative, or more of an individualist mentality? Figure out what type of culture you want to be a part of.

5. You’re excited about the work. At AlphaSights, there aren’t enough hours in the day for all I need to get done, and I’m excited in the morning when I wake up to go to work. The work is stimulating and challenging. I drive my own projects and ideas, and I’m excited about what AlphaSights does at its core. We’re impacting human progress and spreading access to knowledge worldwide. Pretty cool, eh?

6. The company will help you grow professionally. Look for a company that invests in the growth of its people and gives them the skills to grow into management roles, or start their own companies. I learn something every day at AlphaSights. If I go on to do something else one day, I’m confident that I will be equipped with the skills to be successful in whatever I choose, and that’s due to AlphaSights’ investment in my growth.

7. Mobility both vertical and horizontal is promoted. Aim to work somewhere that promotes based on merit, and that encourages you to explore opportunities within the company. It’s not just about growing upwards; it’s also about growing into different roles where you can flex your skills sets.

8. Brings satisfaction. Working at AlphaSights has made both my professional and personal life fuller. We have merit bonuses and promotions; additionally, we have a quarterly awards ceremony to recognize people for different things, like being a great coach or being innovative.

It’s always motivating to reap the benefits of hard work.

9. Brings balance to life. Work should not only be challenging, but it should be fun. You want to work somewhere that respects your work life balance. At the end of the day, family and friends always come first. Life is too short to spend all your time behind a desk. Make sure your company lets you enjoy the ride too.

If the above matches what you’re looking for at your next employer, check out a career at AlphaSights! Get more info and apply to jobs by checking out the below!

Blog: blog.alphasights.com

Instagram: AlphaSightsUS

Facebook: AlphaSightsUS

Twitter: AlphaSightsUS

Website: alphasights.com/careers

Tuesday, September 16 - Seniors: Deadline to Apply to 2015 Entry Level Analyst Role

Want to meet with AlphaSights? They will be at the NYU Career Fair on Thursday, September 4th.  Make sure to check out AlphaSights and our other pt/ft employers. RSVP Today!

 

Fall Job & Internship Fair

Thursday September 4, 2014 11am – 3pm | NYU Kimmel Center
NYU students from all majors are invited to attend our largest fair of the year to explore part-time, full-time and internship opportunities. Meet with employers and learn more about both domestic and international positions.

Engineering & Technology Fall Fair

Thursday, September 18, 2014 11am – 3pm | NYU Brooklyn Campus, Jacobs Gymnasium
NYU students are invited to attend this fair to meet with a large number of employers from diverse industries. Explore full-time, part-time and internship opportunities in fields including Engineering, Computer Hardware/Software, Technology, Science, Management, and Digital Media among others.

Organizing For Action

Purti Pareek, NYU sophomore, talks about her experience as a Fellow at Organizing for Action.

Because of my time as a Fall Fellow at Organizing for Action (OFA), I honed my knowledge of different public policies such as the Affordable Care Act and Comprehensive Immigration Reform and the roadblocks that exist between these policies and getting them passed. I gained important skill sets, which are necessary in order for me to become an effective grassroots organizer. I am forever grateful for OFA because of the different people I met: all of different ages and from different backgrounds. It was refreshing to be working with people that had an interest in the same things as I did but could provide a different perspective on them. OFA provided me with an invaluable experience because it opened doors through which I could further explore my professional interests and support my personal interests. So if you are interested in things like organizing, public policy, and anything in between, definitely apply to be a Spring Fellow and you will not regret it!

Spring Fellowship Opportunity with Organizing for Action

Organizing for Action is a nonprofit grassroots organization established to advance the agenda Americans voted for in 2012.  We are dedicated to empowering individuals to make their voices heard in the fight for progress on our nation’s most pressing issues: comprehensive immigration reform, health reform, gun violence prevention, climate change, marriage equality, equal rights, and building a stronger middle class. Fellows can expect to learn best practices in the areas of community organizing, media relations, and grassroots fundraising. Apply by emailing Spring Trainer, Nina Iventosch at niventosch@barackobama.com or call 917-580-2377.

Being Socially Smart – Part 2

By Rebecca Warner, Founding Member of Social Assurity LLC. Rebecca can be reached at rebecca@socialassurity.com.

Now,  it’s time to brand yourself. Leverage your social media and create a brand that people want.

Derogatory, bigoted, aggressive, antisocial behavior is unacceptable.  Does your social media contain any of the above? Have any of your friends posted questionable material on your profiles? Think of any misbegotten tags and shares. Remember, recruiters or potential employers don’t actually know you so don’t assume that they will understand your content or give you the benefit of the doubt. Will they get that those were just lyrics you posted? Would that matter to them?  Use common sense. You would never badmouth a recruiter or the company that you just interviewed with right?  Sounds like a terrible idea..but you’d be surprised what people broadcast. Remember, social media is social. You have an audience..and if your privacy settings are lax it may be pretty public.  What if a questionable or adverse picture or post never went away? What if that was the first thing that appeared when someone Googled you? Could you live with it? Consider the permanence of your social media. Once you post something you often lose control of it. Even if your privacy settings are airtight, your friends’ may not be. It can be shared and re-posted instantaneously.

Scan your sites for evidence of drug use, alcohol abuse, aggressive or overtly sexual behavior and any signs of social intolerance. Edit. Would you have a resume full of spelling and grammatical mistakes? Would you go to an interview looking sloppy or dirty? Is NYUStud@aol.com the best email address you can think of? If your social media is a mess, that may send the wrong message. So, clean up your social media. Stay competitive.

Once you’ve cleaned up your Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram, and Facebook, etc. you are not done. That’s just half the equation. Cleaning up gets you back to zero. But zero is not where you want to be. You want to stand out and get noticed. Ask the question again. Is your social media doing anything at all for you? Can anybody find you?  You must be visible.  No one can hire you if they can’t find you.  Are you on LinkedIn, Google+, Twitter, Facebook, etc.? Do you have a website? A blog?

So, what does your virtual resume say? If it’s a blank page, it says nothing. Sterile doesn’t persuade employers that you should be on their team.  Show and tell who you are. You have to be persuasive. If you’ve shut down your social media completely or are using a fake name you are missing opportunities. Be authentic. Convince potential employers that you would be a stellar addition to their team, solve their problems and would mesh well with other employees.

How can you convince them? What should people know about you? What have you accomplished? What are your skills? How can you help them? Show and tell how you are a valuable asset.  Have you won any competitions? Are you a leader? Do you volunteer? Telling is powerful but showing can be even more compelling. Use text and media to highlight your attributes while sharing your story and building your brand.

What does your Linkedin profile look like? It should be filled out as completely as possible. You must have a picture. Look professional. Fill out the summary, education, skills, awards, etc. Write recommendations for people you’ve worked with. Like companies, follow your school, connect with people, alumni, recruiters, and join groups. Reach out and engage. Whether it’s with people, companies, recruiters, current employees, etc.

What about Google+? Have a website, great? Get yourself out there! Do you blog? If you have a portfolio, is it online? If not, don’t worry just get busy. Find the best ways to showcase your skills. Get on Twitter, Pinterest, etc. and link your various profiles to one another. Use Pheed and Tumblr to highlight your creative side.

Be mindful of everything you share and update regularly.  So, think about your social media. Are you doing everything you can to stand out, get yourself noticed and get you into that interview or meeting or applicant pool?  Are you easy to connect with? Remember, people will mine their connections for new connections, employees, volunteers, interns, mentors, etc.  Continue to refine your social media and brand.

It’s tough out there so give yourself every advantage you can. Ongoing management of your social media is crucial. At Social Assurity, we say if people are looking, give them something to see. Your social media is one of your biggest assets.

Second semester has barely started, the weather is cold so get going. You’ve got this!

Public Health Fair Next Week

2013 Public Health Fair

Interested in a career in Public Health or just curious to find out more about what the industry has to offer? If so, then the 2013 Public Health Career Fair on Friday, November 8th, is the place for you. From 3:00pm-6:00pm, at the Wasserman Center, students and alumni will have the opportunity to interact and network with a variety of representatives in the public health field and learn about current internship/practicum and employment opportunities.  Here are all the necessary details!

PREPARE with an Info. Session: How to Make the Most out of a Public Health Career Fair | Friday, November 1, 2013 | 5:30-6:30pm | 41 East 11th Street, Room 741

PARTICIPATING ORGANIZATIONS: For a complete list, go to: http://giph.nyu.edu/mph/public-health-practice.html

REGISTRATION: Please RSVP at: https://events.nyu.edu/#event_id/15161/view/event

QUESTIONS: Please refer any questions to careerfairs@nyu.edu or 212.998.4730

Event sponsored the NYU Global Institute of Public Health, the NYU Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, and the NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development.

On-Campus Recruitment (OCR) Survival Guide

By Dario Salvato NYU CAS, 2014

My name is Dario Salvato, and I just finished my internship at Goldman Sachs, where I received and accepted my full time offer in Investment Banking Compliance. Let me start off by saying that if you are using OCR, you are in the right place. All the companies that recruit through our OCR program do it because they specifically want people from our school to work for them. This can greatly work to your benefit if you put in the time and effort to capitalize on the opportunity.

In the remainder of this post I want to give you a bit of advice, first on the OCR process, and then on getting the full time offer once you have your internship.

OCR Process

When I arrived on my first day of work on May 30th after receiving my internship offer through OCR, they told me that “I was one of the only people they interviewed who they knew hands down they were going to extend an offer to for the summer,” and looking back on my OCR experience, I think I know a few of the reasons why, and I want to pass them on to you so that you can focus on those aspects of the process:

-While your resume is extremely important for getting the interview, it won’t get you further than that: Your resume is no doubt the single most important thing for getting you the initial interview you want, so you really need to perfect it, but you also need to realize that once you have the interview, your resume will not help you get the internship–how well you interview will get you the internship. So realize that once you get the interview opportunity, the work isn’t over, it has just begun; now you just know what company/position you need to focus on preparing for.

-Prepare, prepare, prepare: I cannot emphasize enough the importance of preparation. Learn everything you can about the company and about the position–why is this company different from the others in their industry, and what is unique to this position within this company. If you are honest with yourself, you probably aren’t inherently very interested in the actual work of the position, so become interested, by learning about it. In your interviews, you probably won’t have to use 95% of the information you learn about the company and the position, but just knowing it makes you visibly more comfortable, confident, and engaged, which is extremely important for a successful interview.

-Prepare for the inevitable questions: There are a few questions that are inevitable in any OCR interview, and because you know they are coming, they are actually a huge opportunity for you to shine and set yourself apart from the other candidates. You should know what these three crucial questions are:

Tell me about yourself/walk me through your resume

Why do you want to work at [Company Name]?

Why do you want to work in [Position Name]?

Prepare for these questions until you know the answers like the back of your hand–rehearse them in the mirror, record yourself on video, etc.. whatever works for you.

-Prepare for that first question “tell me about yourself”: This is by far the most common interview question, and it is also most likely the first one they will ask you. That means you know it’s coming and you know that the answer you give is going to be their first impression of you. Your first impression is incredibly important, and it also sets the tone for the rest of the interview, so prepare your answer to this question.

So there you have it, prepare your way to an internship offer. Other than preparation, just be polite, smile, and sit up straight in your interviewing chair!

Getting the Full Time Offer at the End of Your Summer Internship

I actually received an “unofficial” full time offer almost three weeks before the end of my internship, and like with OCR, I think I know a few reasons why, and want to pass that insight on to you so that you can succeed in your internship as well.

While your internship really is like a ten week interview, what it takes to be successful during your internship is different than what it takes to be successful in the interviews.

There are four things that I found extremely important for receiving a full time offer:

-Hit the ground running: Just like in the interview, first impressions are crucial. And while it is natural to want to ease yourself into your new position–and a lot of interns do–don’t. Be the intern that starts at 100%, doing excellent work from day 1. Making that first impression will put you ahead of the game, and make your life easier when all of the other interns are trying to make their impressions starting week three and four.

-Be like a sponge; absorb everything you can: As an incoming intern they do not expect you to know much about their business, but they do expect you to have a huge learning capacity. Showing your capacity to learn over the course of your ten week internship is crucial if you want a full time offer–they want to see that you know significantly more at the end of the summer than you did at the beginning. So once again, be like a sponge.

-Go above and beyond what is asked of you, and anticipate the future needs of the people you are working for: If you are asked to do A, do A+, and also do B if you know that you will be asked to do that next. Doing just A (the thing you are asked to do) makes for an average intern, doing A+ (the thing you were asked to do, but exceptionally well) makes for a good intern, and doing A+ and B (the thing you were asked to do, but exceptionally well, and the thing you know you will be asked to do next) makes for a truly exceptional intern.

Networking is important, but it should absolutely not be a focus of your internship: A couple of interns I worked with fell into the trap of getting too absorbed with networking, and they ultimately did not receive a full time offer. Yes, it is important to meet the people at your firm, talk to them, and make good impressions, but the fact of the matter is that meeting people will not get you a full time offer–the exceptional quality of your work will get you the full time offer. Would you hire someone “because they are good at networking”? No. You would hire someone because they are good at their work. So remember, your number one priority is doing you work, and doing it exceptionally well. Networking is useful, but its importance is minimal when compared to the quality of work you produce, and in my opinion it should fall lower on your priority list than these next points as well.

Be personable and be likeable: You want the people you work for to like the work you produce, but you also want them to like you as a person. One of the things that are important in hiring someone is whether or not people will actually enjoy working with you. Do you have a positive attitude? Are you polite and kind to people?

While these things alone will not get you a full time offer, they are a great supplement to producing excellent work.

Lastly, be humble: Let people brag about your work for you. Positive talk about your work sounds better coming from other people than it does coming from you. Doing excellent work and being humble about it is not easy, but it is another thing that will set you apart from the majority.


That’s all I have for you. And I would say best of luck with OCR, but after reading this post, you probably know that I think luck has little to do with it!

Self discovery to advance your career

According to Gallup, 7 out of 10 workers say they are not engaged or are actively disengaged in their careers.  How can you increase your satisfaction in your current role and plan ahead for growth opportunities?  By taking advantage of your strengths and minimizing your stressors!

Understand what energizes you

Think about your day-to-day tasks.  Which ones put a smile on your face, and which ones automatically make you feel tired and dread the rest of your day?  A quick exercise is to print out your weekly calendar, and put a star next to the activities or meetings you enjoyed, and an X next to the ones you didn’t.  At the end of the week, you can review what parts of the job are fantastic, and which ones are more tedious.  Use this to schedule the following week, making sure to give more time to the things you enjoy and are good at.  While very few jobs cater to your strengths 100% of the time, you can influence the balance by talking to your boss about your responsibilities and highlighting your strengths.

Be spontaneous

Random requests for help and assistance often float by your desk, and it is easy to not respond because you are busy.  However, if you want to discover other areas where you can apply your strengths, volunteer!  Engaging with colleagues that you don’t normally work with can re-energize your spirit for the work that you do.  Plus, if these side projects are successful, you can add those skills to your resume, or pitch that experience to your boss as a reason to alter your role.

Be organized

What do you want longer term from your career?  What is the next role you want to be in, and what skills or experiences do you need to get that opportunity?  Create a plan to learn the skills you need for the next job.  Talk to your manager about growth opportunities.  Network with alumni and other industry experts to learn how to make the transition.  While you want to be engaged in your work immediately, it might take some time to plan out the right move to achieve your goals.

Self assessment

The Wasserman Center has assessments that can help you learn about your best self and what stresses you face at all stages of your career.  We can also help you create a plan to advance your career and gain new opportunities.  To learn more, sign up for a career counseling appointment through NYU CareerNet.

What the job search is like….after college.

So you just graduated from college…

Congratulations!

Now its time to find a job.

You feel confident…even though you hear the job market is rough.

(Hey, U.S. Labor Markets indicate an increase in employment.)

So, you hunker down and start searching.

But, you quickly learn entry level loosely translates to 1-3 years of experience.

And, although a Bachelor’s degree is required, a Master’s degree is what’s really preferred.

But! You have internships and part-time jobs to boast…and that questionable summer spent as a “Sandwich Artist”.

After weeding out all the “Kid Kamp Instructors” and the “Pool Guards,” you sit down to write your resume.

Finally, you finish your resume….but, now you have to write your cover letter and explain why you want to work there.

You finish, and finally hit submit on your application.

So you wait…

And you wait…

And you wait.

But, its been like, forever, and you haven’t heard anything back.

You send out more resumes…

More cover letters.

You do all you can think!

You start to get a little testy…

Maybe a little sad.

You can’t stand the thought of one more rejection.

When friends tell you about their new job, this is how you react.

And you seem a little on edge when friends and family ask you how you’re doing.

You even start to lash out a bit (like that time your mom told you dinner was ready).

(…)

You wait some more…but still nothing.

You feel like you are beginning to lose all hope…

and you don’t know what to do anymore.

Then, you remember. Ahh, yes…the Wasserman Center.

You see a little glimmer of hope.

They have job postings.

They have counselors to help you improve your resumes and cover letters.

They have seminars to help build your professionals skills and to help you ace that interview.

They have a network of professionals willing to help you.

They have the full social media works – Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest, LinkedIn, WasserTube, and more – to keep you constantly informed.

There is even an Alumni Listserv just for you!

Most importantly, we are here to help you succeed.

So, even if it gets tough out there.

And you feel like giving up.

You have the Wasserman Center.

And, somehow, we know its going to be alright.

Summer Career Checklist

Summer break doesn’t mean you have to take a break from your career development!  Whether you are interning, taking classes, working part-time or just relaxing, here are some to-do’s:

Update and polish your resume

You may have some great courses, academic projects, part-time jobs or internships to add from this past academic year.  Write those great bullet points when these experiences are fresh in your mind.

Build your skills

Even if you aren’t working part-time or interning, it’s important for you to continue to build skills that will be relevant for employers.  Volunteer with an organization a few days a month, teach yourself a new technology, review relevant industry resources and review some of our skill-building tips!

Foster and expand your network

Networking is most effective when you don’t need something (like a job) right away.  Reach out to previous colleagues, friends, and professors to check in, say hi and maybe grab lunch.  Use some of the Wasserman Center’s resources or LinkedIn.com to set up some informational interviews and expand your existing network.

Reflect

Sometimes it’s hard to find time during the academic year to reflect.  Take some time to think about the past year.   What did you learn about your career preferences, work-ethic, strengths, and weaknesses?  What activities or classes did you love? Were there others you disliked?  How might the responses to these questions help you plan for for next year or even post-graduation?  Need some help reflecting?  On to our next item….

Schedule a counseling appointment

Not in NYC? No problem.  Counselors are available for virtual or phone appointments.  Schedule via your NYU CareerNet account and cover topics like resumes, cover letters, interview prep, networking tips or take a career assessment.

Tapping the Hidden Job Market

If you attended our seminar last night, you already know that nearly 70% of jobs are found by Tapping the Hidden Job Market.  But in case you missed it, here are some tips and tricks for recent graduates looking for a job, current students searching for an internship, or for experienced professionals who are seeking to advance their career.

Adjust Your Approach

Adjust your approach and cut back on the job boards!  Ideally you should spend 75% of your efforts on active job search strategies such as networking with individuals and companies of interest to you.  Spend the extra 25% of your efforts on more passive approaches such as job boards and applying through company websites.

Expand Your Network

60 – 75% of jobs are found through networking.  Be sure to target current/former colleagues, friends, family, NYU alumni…everyone!  Never disregard an opportunity to network.  Even if a contact is not in your target industry, they may know someone who is!  You may meet such individuals by asking for informational interviews, joining professional associations, and attending events in your industry or function.

Build Relationships

Remember, in building relationships with your professional contacts, you want to set goals to acquire information and resources- NOT ask for a job.  You must first build out the relationship by asking for an informational interview, sending professional updates, sharing relevant industry information, introducing your contact to others in your network, or inviting them to industry events.  It is important to try to maintain the relationship when possible so that when a job opportunity arises, your contact will think of you for the position.

Tip:  Create a spreadsheet of your contacts so you can keep track of your activity.

Include the date you met them, what you discussed, your means of communication (In-person, email, or phone) etc.  Always follow up!

Get on Social Online

Use online platforms, like LinkedIn, to connect with professionals and groups in your industry.  Build out your profiles and interactions to reflect your personal brand and expertise.  The same rules apply for your online job search strategy!  Spend 25% of your time applying to jobs and 75% of your time networking.

FYI:  NYU Wasserman Center career counselors will help you revamp your online profiles!  If you want to learn more about Leveraging LinkedIn join us for a short webinar on July 10 from 12 – 12:30 to learn how to maximize your online presence.

By following these steps, you will be able to revise your job search strategy to become a more active participant who can showcase their abilities and contributions to a potential employer within your targeted industry.  Devising and enacting an effective strategy to tap the hidden job market takes planning and time.  Request a career counseling appointment to discuss your strategy with a career counselor, and start on your path for a successful job search today.

Resource of the Week: Pinterest

Pinterest may be that landscape of food, fashion, DIY and wedding planning. But, boasting 50 million users, this visual heavy social network can also be used vastly in your job search and for your career objectives.

Many people prefer to absorb information visually. This form of visual learning is not only limited to Yoga instructions or fondue recipes. It can also include interviewing tips, preparing your resume, and industry information.

Use Pinterest to stay organized and use images to remind you of things you have read or images that have inspired you.

Quick tip: If you don’t want people to see a certain board – say which companies you are researching – change that board to private for your own viewing.

Pinterest To-do List:

  1. Follow companies that interest you: Stay up to date on companies’ most recent pins to see what advancements or changes the company may be making. You can also use it to have a glimpse into the company culture.
  2. Follow career experts: Many experts and career sites use Pinterest as a way to consolidate their articles. By following career experts, you can gain insight on your job search and also how to excel in a particular industry. You can also learn new skills and tips to make you a better candidate

But, also use Pinterest to explore and to inspire. Discover ideas on how to dress professionally – both for men and women, how to answer difficult interview questions, or how to behave at a formal business luncheon.

Pinterest allows you to share content and images from external websites as well as to showcase talent and work from your own hard-drive.  You can use Pinterest as Project Board for your own, original work. Or, you can even use Pinterest as a virtual resume to supplement your physical resume.

Don’t forget, link your Pinterest to your Facebook and Twitter accounts to grow your followers and spread your social media impact.

Pinterest Homework: Build a Visual Resume Board

While a standard, black and white resume is still required for most positions, a visual resume can be a way to supplement your job search and set you apart from the crowd. By creating a visual resume, you can showcase your work history and demonstrate your experience in a pictorial manner.

Where to begin? Pin photos of schools you’ve attended with links to the programs you enrolled in. Similarly, pin logos of companies you’ve worked or professional associates you are a part of.  You can also pin images of awards you’ve won or achievements you’ve made over the past few years.

Once you’ve pinned some images and linked to the appropriate websites, utilize the text box provided. Be sure to capture the importance of each pin as well as how it relates to your career or work objectives.

You can also add a quick description of your visual resume board through the “Edit Board” option.

The key is to concisely depict your professional image and brand through your board’s content and tone.

Once you’ve completed your visual resume board, be sure to share it with your followers. You can add a direct link to your visual resume board on your physical resume, as well as your Email signature, LinkedIn and other social media websites.