Tag Archives: networking

Student Perspectives: Social Media + Networking for the Job Search

by: Lauren Stewart

Lauren S. Stewart

Lauren S. Stewart  is a current 2nd year MPA in Public and Nonprofit Management and Policy candidate, with a specialization in management at NYU’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. Lauren is currently a program assistant for multicultural career programs at NYU’s Wasserman Center for Career Development and an intern at Kenneth Cole Productions in their Corporate Citizenship department. With a passion for philanthropy, corporate social responsibility, and social entrepreneurship, Lauren plans to utilize the skills learned at NYU Wagner to influence society to focus on social responsibility as a top priority within any industry. Lauren is originally from Midlothian, VA and received a B.A. in psychology from The University of Virginia.

I (heart) LinkedIn!

Moving to the big city from Virginia was quite the experience. As plans came together with starting graduate school at NYU Wagner, finding housing in Harlem, and securing a graduate program assistant role at NYU Wasserman, I believed that I was on the fast track to success. I’m sure you’re waiting for the but…

Well, I really was on the fast track to success until I sat in on NYU Wasserman’s annual Business Bootcamp. One of the speakers spoke about the importance of networking and Linkedin. Yea, I had heard of it. I thought it was just for old and established career professionals. I never understood the value in just another Facebook. Yes, I now know that Linkedin and Facebook are completely different! It’s amazing how you underestimate certain tools when you do not truly understand their purpose or their value! When I expressed to my colleagues that I didn’t have a Linkedin, their expressions ranged from shock to pity. They pretty much made me create an account that day and reiterated the opportunity it could bring.

I am now in my second year at NYU Wagner & NYU Wasserman. Linkedin was once a platform that I knew nothing about. Now it has become my favorite social network! Funny right? I enjoy making new professional connections, reading industry articles, and staying up to date with jobs openings so that I can connect friends and family to various opportunities. This semester, I received my first InMail from a recruiter. (InMail = email for Linkedin users for all you novices out there.) She viewed my profile and believed that I would be a great fit for Kenneth Cole’s Corporate Citizenship Department. I will now be an intern in the department this fall thanks to LinkedIn! 

Don’t have a LinkedIn? It’s time to get one!

Want to learn about other ways to network? Attend one of the upcoming Social Media + Networking for your Job Search seminars:

Asking for Advice, Not a Job: How to Conduct Informational Interviews

Megan Yasenchak is a current graduate student at NYU School of Continuing and Professional Studies, pursuing a Masters in Global Affairs.  She attended the NYU Wasserman Center@SCPS career event, entitled, “Asking for Advice, Not a Job: How to Conduct Informational Interviews” which was presented by Rachel Frint, Associate Director, NYU Wasserman Center at SCPS.  In competitive job markets, informational interviews are a key resource to assist job seekers by expanding and cultivating their career networks.

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What is Informational Interviewing?

Informational interviewing is a form of networking with experts from your field or a related industry. It is a personal meeting, one-on-one, where you are leading the conversation with that person by asking them for advice, insight and guidance in developing your career path. In these meetings, you ask questions about their own career experiences and their organizations as well. This process allows you to make a positive impression on an expert outside of the confines of a traditional job interview.

Why is Informational Interviewing important?

Informational interviewing is asking for resources, not asking for a job. However, informational interviewing may connect you to job opportunities. Frequently, employers do not post all of their vacancies through public announcements. These un-posted vacancies are referred to as the “hidden job market,” which accounts for nearly 70% of job opportunities.

Through informational interviewing, a job seeker leaves an impression with that industry expert. You are investing your time in building a relationship with the expert that can lead to, potentially, other future industry contacts. This networking could result in job opportunities.

How To Identify Potential Contacts

Everyone is a potential contact. There are “strong” connections, such as family and friends and “weak” connections, like classmates, former co-workers or new acquaintances at events. Use your personal network, professional associations, social media and the Wasserman Center to expand your connections!

How To Initiate an Informational Interview

First, identify who you are (i.e. your brand), what do you want to communicate, what are your goals and how you can maintain this relationship.

When requesting an informational interview, be clear and direct in your request. Introduce yourself and explain any connection, why you would like to meet and how you would like to connect (e.g. telephone, in person, video chat).

How to Conduct the Informational Interview

Your informational interview is to gain insight from an industry expert. Be prepared for the meeting by thinking of topics of conversation, conducting research on that person and/or organization and think of questions. Informational interviewing is your chance to gain critical insight into your career field from experts!

After the Informational Interview

Your goal is to maintain this relationship and build connections, especially after the meeting. Remember to send a quick thank you note (within 24 hours). Maintain the relationship by sending your contact an update on your professional life (every 1-3 months).

 Maintaining so many current and future contacts may seem daunting; so divide your connections into a manageable list. Meet with new one person every week. Try to schedule one informational interview every month. Reconnect with one former contact every week.

To develop your own career strategies for building a network, schedule an appointment with a NYU Wasserman Center Career Coach through NYU CareerNet

Networking at Your Summer Internship

Professional schmoozing is one of the keys to turning a summer gig into a permanent job. Because networking (done right) leaves a great impression on the employer, it can lead to a permanent job offer or a handy recommendation. Here’s how:

Beef Up Your Memory. When summer interns bump into the same high-level manager on their way to get coffee the manager will be a lot more impressed if the potential employee remembers something about them, says Anna Mok, a Strategic Relationships partner at Deloitte & Touche. Mok suggests that interns should put in the effort to remember anecdotes and names of co-workers and keep notes on whom they’ve met.

Be Sincere. Kristen Garcia, a group sales manager at Macy’s West (M) says that her genuine interest in meeting others from the company got her the job offer after she interned at Macy’s two years ago. “I introduced myself briefly to someone who wasn’t my direct boss, and it got me to work on an advertising project that the rest of the interns weren’t working on,” Garcia says. “But I never misrepresented myself and was always sincere.” Butler agrees, “To be indiscriminate for the sake of networking is going to be a waste of your time and not get you what you want.”

Find Some Face Time. Online networking sites, such as LinkedIn, are great. But to truly build connections, Mok, encourages interns to join professional organizations in their field to get valuable face time. Especially for those in a large city, a variety of networking groups are available and organizers are often thrilled to get younger members. Dave Wills, vice-president of Seattle-based Cascade Link, encourages interested interns to join tech clubs and professional organizations organizations. “Through those clubs we’ve met people whom we’ve hired as interns or to work on other projects.”

Join in the Big Kid Activities. Interns don’t need to stick to their own kind. Instead, ask to play in the company softball league or volunteer with their charity of choice. For those willing to be more proactive it helps to create an activity others from the company would be excited to join.

Show Up Alone. If fellow interns at the company don’t join that optional lunch or head over for a few drinks at a happy hour—go alone and meet others at the organization. In fact, not bringing work friends to networking events helps guests leave their comfort zone and meet new contacts, according to a study by Columbia Business School professors Paul Ingram and Michael Morris.

Skip the E-Mail. Most key figures at a company are overwhelmed with their inbox, so instead of being 1 out of 200 messages, pick another way to communicate. Instead, a quick hello or a short chat goes a long way according to Wills. “A phone call is still appropriate,” he says and encourages interns to figure out a convenient time in the day. “I’m always booked solid in the mornings, but usually the afternoons for me are pretty laid-back”.

Save the Tough for Last. Reach out to those who are easiest to approach first—hold off on chatting with the heads of the company who probably know less about incoming interns. “Don’t start at the top of the food chain—network with people who can still identify with where you are as a student intern,” says Ken Keeley, executive director of the Career Opportunities Center at Carnegie Mellon’s Tepper School of Business. Going to the higher-ups later in the summer also increases the chance that a colleague will put in a good word about the intern before the actual approach.

Evaluate Them. Not only is networking a tool interns use to stand out, it’s also a way for students to find out whether they’re willing to commit to a full-time job. “Many times these organizations force students to make big decisions before campus recruiting, so the companies will know how much recruiting they have to do during the school year.” Garcia, who received her offer in September of senior year, agrees: “Not only did I want to make a good impression on the company, I wanted the company to make a good impression on me.”

Source: Dizik, Alina. “Networking for Interns.” www.businessweek.com Bloomberg, L.P. 18 June 2007. Web. 04 June 2014

Professional Networking Tips from Treatings

Hayden Williams is Co-Founder and CEO of Treatings. Treatings is a professional networking platform that facilitates one-on-one meetups over coffee. Prior to Treatings, Hayden spent four years as an investment banker at BofA Merrill Lynch. He graduated from Vanderbilt in 2008 with a degree in Economics and Corporate Strategy.

My first job out of college was in investment banking. While Vanderbilt’s Career Center was a great resource in securing the job, it was the individual relationships I’d built the summer after my junior year that were most helpful in deciding what I wanted to do.

I was living in New York doing an internship in Consulting. I realized that I didn’t want to work in Consulting after graduating, so I had to figure out an alternative career path. I started reaching out to all of the Vanderbilt alumni I could find who were working in roles I was interested in, asking people out for coffee so I could learn about their job.

The most helpful conversations I had were with junior people working at the level I would be starting in. I wasn’t looking for a job offer, just access to information about what certain roles were like and what types of people succeeded in them. I found it more difficult to find junior people than senior people. Young professionals aren’t prominently displayed on company websites and often don’t think to open themselves up on alumni networks. But, by the end of the summer I’d met enough people in investment banking that I decided the transferable financial skills I’d pick up as an Analyst would make for a good place to start my career.

Fast forward three years later and I was promoted to Associate. I had learned a lot and worked with great people, but realized that I didn’t want to remain in investment banking forever. I wasn’t passionate about the work and my skill set was getting narrower. I wanted to leave the finance industry and potentially work at a start-up, but I didn’t know how viable that would be given my lack of technical expertise.

My best friend (and now co-founder), Paul, was in a similar situation. We both wanted to leave our finance jobs, but didn’t want to blindly transition to a job that wouldn’t be a great fit. We wanted to talk to peers who had made career transitions we were interested in. I found that existing professional networking tools were helpful in documenting and leveraging my professional network, but not reaching outside of it. This was a problem because no one in my network worked at a start-up.

Paul and I decided there should be a professional networking equivalent to online dating sites, where people could go when they wanted to meet people outside their network. So, we quit our jobs to build Treatings, a local professional network where everyone is open to meeting over coffee to share ideas and opportunities.

The core value that Treatings offers is access to knowledge. We believe that people’s insights and career experiences have as much latent value as any physical good they own, so we’re always looking to reduce the friction of knowledge transfer.

We’re a peer-to-peer networking site. We don’t differentiate between “consumers” of knowledge and “producers” of it. Most people sign up for Treatings as a consumer, not imagining that people would be interested in their insights. People are often surprised and flattered to hear they can be a producer of knowledge when they are asked by fellow members to talk about their work. People have been using Treatings to find collaborators, meet people with shared interests and learn about new skills.

We have incorporated a filter into Treatings that makes it easy for NYU alumni and students to connect with each other. You can sign up for the platform and follow companies and skills you’re interested in. You’re then matched with other members based on shared interests and can propose coffee meetings with whomever you’d like.

We think networking should be a routine part of people’s lives, but it doesn’t have to be boring or formal. Treatings is all about taking conversations about your work out of the office. We hope you get the opportunity to meet fellow members of the NYU community over coffee (or the beverage of your choice!).

Sign up today! treatings.co

Networking at the Summer BBQ

So, with the long weekend approaching, and the weather warming up nicely, you may find yourself outdoors this weekend, enjoying a nice barbecue, picnic, or celebration. If not this weekend, you’ll definitely be outdoors in a social setting at some point this summer. In addition to simply relaxing and catching up with friends and family, you would be wise to take that time and use it to network and plan ahead in your career search. Whether you’re a recent graduate looking for full-time employment or still in school and angling for an internship, here are a few quick tips for when you find yourself gathered outdoors with potential contacts.

1. Go easy on the food & drink

Sure, you can grab something off the grill and have a refreshing drink. It’s summer, after all! However, be mindful of your intake when in networking mode. It’s not cool to be talking through your burger or to be expanding on your interests with mustard on your face. Similarly, it’s best to not excitedly slur your way through a conversation because you’ve had one or two too many beverages. Think in moderation!

2. Start small and don’t monopolize time

When you identify people that you’d like to speak with, make some small talk before delving into more job-related topics. Folks are in leisure mode and don’t want to be bombarded with anxious or overzealous interrogators. When the conversation turns toward business, ask a relevant question or two or showcase something specific from your set of qualifications. Avoid a rehearsed speech and don’t attempt to rehash your entire resume. Sometimes all it takes is a mention that you’re looking for work to get the ball rolling, so also make sure that you are honest and clear in your career intentions. Know when to wrap things up, too. If you’re around the same people for most of the afternoon, you won’t want to be talking shop all day. If that person is just making a quick appearance at the outing, you’ll want to allow them to make the rounds without you taking up all of their time.

3. Make the most of that time you have, though

Be sure to thank the person and ask for a business card or contact information, so that you can follow up at a later date. Perhaps you can meet up again for coffee or for a tour of the office? Hopefully, you’ll be able to send along your resume in a later email. Asking for contact information ensures that you’ll be able to take the conversation further! Plus, don’t forget to follow up with a thank-you email.

4. Continue moving forward

Hopefully, your conversations led somewhere. At the minimum, you should have probably received some insight or advice that compels you to further your research and career exploration. Add the people you spoke to on LinkedIn, Google their companies, and use sites like CareerNet and Vault to look more closely at the person’s day-to-day job responsibilities. Keep the motivation and idea gathering flowing!

Networking On and Offline

Samantha Knoerzer, a Publishing graduate student in SCPS, offers insight into the recent Networking On and Offline event. She is currently a eBook production intern at Berghahn Books, an international, academic book publishing house that resides in Dumbo, Brooklyn and works as a social media coordinator for BiblioCrunch, a source for indie publishers which helps connect self-published authors and publishers with book publishing professionals to get new books and apps to the market.

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Networking is an important part of furthering your career while attending and after NYU.  Whether you are looking to begin your career, expand it, or even if you want to switch careers completely, panelist speakers highlighted that it is important to network and get to know people in your field in order to expand your opportunities. The panelists stressed that networking is not about calling everyone in search of a job. Rather it is about building relationships, staying in touch with your current network, sharing information, asking for assistance, and most importantly, being authentic.

The four most important tips from the panel were:

  1. The three main steps of networking:

    1. Setting a career vision: Understand why you should network. Networking is important, as everyone already knows. It is important to understand two things when networking: What is my career vision? And, what do I want my next steps to be? By understanding these two things, you can begin to map out a potential career path via networking.

    2. Analyze yourself: Understand what you should network. Many people get stuck at this section, knowing that they want to network, but not knowing how to do so. In order to begin this path to networking, you need to ask yourself: What knowledge/skills/info do I have now? And, what knowledge/skills/info do I NEED in order to begin my networking path? Once you understand this, you can begin to network for your career.

    3. Set networking goals: Create networking goals to complete your career goals. Some sample networking goals are: What is the next step I should take in my career? How can I make a career change into publishing? What qualities is a specific company looking for? What are the trends that are happening in my field? Why am I not getting hired? In order to answer some of these questions, start by making a networking inventory of all the people you already know.

  2. Finding networking contacts online: How do you find contacts to strangers in your field online? The answer: Always look for online networking opportunities. Plenty of places hold networking events advertised through social media. Some other networking actions can even be done directly through online. TaskRabbit, Findspark, Glassdoor, as well as many other sites allow people to go online and complete tasks and take part in online networking webinars in order to network directly from home. Taking part in social media, and following important people in the industry online is the other great way to network online. However, before you do anything, you should make sure to have your own social media up to date.

    1. Twitter networking tips: For Twitter make sure to complete your entire profile. Post a good icon image consisting of a headshot with a single colored background. Once that is done, make sure to follow important people and companies in your industry that have a huge pull in the networking world, and while you do this, share valuable content to be noticed. Finally, always make sure to ask questions on your Tweets to get people engaged with your page and make sure that you, yourself stay engaged with others in the social networking circles that surround you.

    2. Linked In Networking tips: For LinkedIn, make sure to use a profile summary, and once again use a professional photo with similar description as the requirement for your Twitter account. Make sure to always grow your network and join groups that can be of networking value to you. Look on sites such as linkedin.com/alumni to stay connected with your past networking circles, always pay attention to recommendations, and upload projects and portfolios whenever completed. And once again, most importantly, STAY ENGAGED!

    3. Sending emails for requesting informational conversation: Sometimes, the best way to network and really get to know more about a company is to set up an informational interview. From these you can learn valuable information about a company, and really connect with a circle that if you desire to work within, you should understand and connect to. When sending an informational interview/conversation email request make sure to keep it short and simple, sticking to the three main points: Who are you? Why are you writing to them? How much time is this going to take? Making sure to keep your email short and concise will give you the best way to become an interest of connection to the person you are emailing.

  3. Finding networking contacts offline: Offline is just as important, if not more important, than online networking. Going to events can be the best ways to make in person connections. Making in person connections gets people to know you by not only name, but face, which can help you in the long run when you show up to an office for an interview and see people you know. Like what was said in the panel, “Every time you step outside, it is an interview.” Stay friendly and get to know the people around you, even the people next to you in class, to ensure a great networking circle in every aspect of your life.

  4. How to build a relationship via networking: The steps to building a relationship are crucial. First, make sure to send a personalized message introducing yourself. After the meeting, make sure to send a thank you email consisting of follow up thoughts and questions that you still may have. After one month, consider reaching out to send a virtual hand, if needed. Four to six months past that, plan to meet up for coffee, or setup a phone chat. Nine to twelve months after your original introduction, consider an email or phone call consisting of personal and professional updates in order to stay in touch. After this, always send some reconnect emails and attempt to repeat the same cycle in order to keep your networking connection strong.

Next steps: What can you do right now? Make networking manageable; do it a little bit at a time and challenge yourself. Right now start establishing your networking skills by meeting 2 new contacts each week, schedule one informational interview a month, and attempt to reconnect with one person you’ve lost touch with each week. Reach out to existing contacts, takes notes for personal touch, select a tracking mechanism and schedule check-in points. You can even consider scheduling an appointment with a career coach to review your networking plan and help with your correspondence. This is available right now at NYU’s Wasserman Center. All of these opportunities are available to you right now. Why not take advantage of them?

Wasserman Center Meet Ups

Informational interviews can be a great way to develop your career path: allowing you a chance to gain insight into a job field and to make some new connections. However, if you don’t know what to expect or how to prepare, it can be a stressful situation. Here are some tips to make sure you get the most out of your informational interview.

Do:

  1. Research the company and the role. You want to keep informational interviews pretty short (about 30 minutes), so make sure that you’re using your time during the interview to learn some insider details about the job or the company. A good resource can be the Vault Career Insider, which can be accessed through your home page on CareerNet.
  2. Bring a resume. Even though you aren’t asking for a job (more on that later!), you want to let the interviewer get a good picture of your experience so they can give you information and advice that’s most relevant to you. This also can help them remember details about you if you maintain a relationship with the interviewer.
  3. Prepare questions that really interest you. Reflect on what matters to you in a job – hours, mobility, culture, etc. Some common questions are: What do you see as the potential for growth in this field? What can I do now to help me find employment in this field? What do you like about your career and what don’t you like about it?

Don’t:

  1. Ask for a job, internship, or interview. The interviewer granted you the informational interview as a chance for learning and networking, and if you turn it into a job hunt it will likely turn them off and hurt your reputation. After the interviewer gets to know you, it’s possible that they will keep you in mind for future hiring needs. But now is not the time.
  2. Show up without a goal in mind. If you don’t have a clear purpose for the interview, your questions and interactions might seem disjointed. Before the interview, think about what you really want to achieve: build professional contacts, learn how to break into a field, decide what role might be best for you, etc.
  3. Come too early. An informational interview usually benefits you more than it benefits the interviewer, so you don’t want to assume too much of their time. Stick to the schedule as much as possible.

Not sure that your informational interviewing skills are up to par? Schedule an appointment with a career counselor or come to a Wasserman Meet Up for a chance to chat with Wasserman staff and employers in a relaxed setting.

Meet Ups are coming up on Friday February 28, Tuesday March 11, and Thursday March 27. Click the links for more details and to RSVP.

MBA Q&A Recap

By: Indra Kar

On October 24th, the NYU Wasserman Center hosted a MBA Q&A Information Session. As a junior majoring in Economics, I was interested to see what the panelists had to offer regarding MBA admissions. There were five people on the panel:

Brian White, Assistant Director of MBA Admissions, NYU Stern

Liz Batsche, Current MBA Student, NYU Stern

Daniel Egan, Director of Energy and Sustainability, Vornado Realty (MBA CUNY)

Amy Leasca, Marketing Director, HBO (MBA Fordham)

It was a very informative program that was organized by Wasserman, and it was very helpful. There were three key takeaways from the seminar:

Essays and Recommendations are Important

Just like the college application process that we are familiar with, the MBA admissions process depends on factors other than GPA and standardized test scores. Both Brian White and Amy Leasca encouraged finding undergraduate professors and former mentors who would be willing to take the time to write very good recommendations.

Liz Batsche stated that applicants should be authentic when writing their essays because schools are looking for “the right fit.” And the essays provide outlets to demonstrate this “fit.” Daniel Egan provided a personal anecdote. He said that he was a liberal arts student in college at NYU where he majored in Metropolitan Studies which itself is not necessarily business-inclined. But he was still admitted into an MBA program of his choice. From his success, he recommended that applicants take advantage of their strengths and hone in on them in their application.

You Do Not Have to Apply While in College

All four panelists had prior work experience before entering an MBA program. Mr. Egan highly recommended a break between the end of undergraduate school and the beginning of MBA school. For him specifically, he worked in real estate for a few years after graduating from college at NYU. He didn’t start attending the MBA program at CUNY-Baruch until five years after he graduated from NYU. And he said that he was very happy he took the time off. Mr. Egan chose to apply to CUNY-Baruch’s real estate program because he was very interested in that industry.

Mr. White, who works for NYU Stern’s MBA admissions department, also worked for a few years before he attended Stern. He said that the majority applicants for a number of concentrations have at least a year of work experience. So it may actually be in the best interest of the applicant to take time off after college and gain work experience.

Ms. Leasca only applied to Fordham’s MBA school which she would eventually attend and graduate from. However, she regretted only applying to one school. Her advice was to apply to a few schools because it is important to see what different schools have to offer. If students take a year or two off before applying, they will have those years to fully research MBA programs and figure out which ones are best for them.

Networking and Campus Visits are Very Helpful

We know that having connections with the right people can help someone land a job. It can also help your chances of admission to a top MBA school.

 All of the panelists emphasized that a campus visit is a great way to network with current students and admissions officers. Mr. Egan commented on how this skill is important even when you are already attending MBA school. The reason is that connections can become your “lifelines” when the nature of an industry changes. And you don’t know when a particular industry will go through these changes, so you need a safety net of people in case your department unexpectedly becomes down-sized.

Insider Tips for the NGO, NonProfit, and Government Forum

Celia Givens is a junior at NYU studying Middle Eastern Studies & Political Science senior graduating in May 2014. Here is her take on making the most of NGO, NonProfit, and Government Forum.

I’ve always been interested in working for a government organization, so I jumped at the chance to attend the NGO, Non-Profit, & Government Forum in Washington D.C. last year. Although I dreaded getting up for the bus that leaves from Wasserman at 6am, I learned a lot about specific organizations and made some amazing industry connections.

Not surprisingly, career fairs are what you make of them. If you don’t prepare ahead of time you can end up wasting your entire day sweating in a business suit. Here are some tips to make sure you make the most of the NGO, Non-Profit, & Government Forum this year:

Research the organizations beforehand

Wasserman will always post the list of organizations on NYU CareerNet before the career fair. Decide which companies you are interested in and research them online. Take notes so when you’re talking to the recruiter you can impress them with your knowledge and interest in the company.

Plan your route

Career fairs are crowded and students tend to swarm the same five tables. Look at the map of the fair before you start making rounds so you can be strategic. If one table is too crowded, come back a little later when it’s less busy so you can have a meaningful conversation. Pro tip: Talk to the companies you are dying to work for early in the day before recruiters get hungry and start thinking about lunch. Recruiters are people too, and they get tired.

Bring several copies of your resume

This is a no brainer. If you end up getting along well with a recruiter and you don’t have a resume on you, you might be blowing your chance. Print at least 10 copies, on clean, white paper. Always have them readily accessible so you don’t spend five minutes searching through your bag to hand it to an employer.

Prepare 2-3 questions about the company

Every student asks the same question: Tell me about your organization! Recruiters are used to giving students the same talking points about their company, especially if there is a long line. Instead, ask them about their internship program for paralegals or their specialization in grassroots campaign training. These are the questions that will help them remember you when you follow-up later on.

Ask for a business card and follow up

Always ask for a business card. On the back, write down several things you spoke to the recruiter about so you will remember exactly who they are later. In the next few days, (no later!) send them a follow-up email detailing who you are, what you spoke about, and what you are interested in. By including what you spoke about, the recruiter will be more likely to remember you and help you out. Even if they aren’t hiring, you can always ask for an informational interview (or phone call!) to learn more about the industry.

If you are interested in a job or internship with an NGO, Non-Profit, or Government organization come join us at the Forum in DC on December 6th. Click https://nyu-csm.symplicity.com/students/index.php?mode=form&id=ac7e75fb9415d54519edfe94f308cd45&s=event&ss=ws for more information on the fair and reserving a seat on the Wasserman bus to DC.

What will you learn at Business Boot Camp? GSAS student Heng Lyu will tell ya!


Boot camps are full day conferences designed to explore the realities of working in various industries. Highlights include a keynote speakeenr and seminars facilitated by industry leaders. Created in partnership with Morgan Stanley, these intensive career conferences are designed to familiarize students with a variety of industries and to help ease the transition from the classroom to the workplace. Here’s a profile of a student that has participated in the Boot Camp series before, and is looking forward to the upcoming Business Boot Camp.

Name: Heng Lyu
School: GSAS
Major: Computer Science
Professional Goals: Developer (short term), CEO (long term)

Please share something you learned at Internship Boot Camp: 

I learned different job search strategies, networking strategies, and the importance of sharing career goals with others.

Why are you excited to attend Business Boot Camp?: 

I am looking forward to strengthening my knowledge of different business areas, including technology. I would also like to learn about common sense practices in business, entrepreneurship, understanding corporate culture, understanding economic trends, getting an insider’s perspective of the business world, networking with professionals in the field, and improving my knowledge of business terminology. At Boot Camp I hope to make friends with similar career interests.

Business Boot Camp for Liberal Arts Students

Deadline to apply: Mon, Nov 18th

Event Date: Thursday, Jan 23 and Friday, Jan 24, 2014

Get an inside look at the corporate world at this two-day conference for liberal arts and science students. The goal is to provide students with knowledge of industry terminology, an understanding of transferable liberal arts skills, and a basic overview of sectors within the business world including financial services, marketing and digital media, advertising, consulting, and entrepreneurship.  Apply here!