Tag Archives: professionalism

How to “Wow” Your Interviewer

Claudia Enriquez is a second year student receiving her Masters in Public Administration from NYU Wagner. She currently works as a Graduate Program Assistant at NYU Wasserman. She is a New Yorker at heart, growing up in Long Island, then moving to upstate New York to attend college, and now she’s back downstate and enjoying her time at NYU.

You landed the interview, now it’s time to bring out your A game and really ‘wow’ your interviewer. Follow these simple steps below and prepare to land that dream job/internship!

Research, Research, Research

Did I mention research? Check out the company’s website. Review the company’s mission statement, values, culture, goals, achievements, recent events, and the company’s products/services.  If you know anyone who works there – ask him/her to give you the inside scoop!

Practice Makes Perfect…Or at least Preparation!

Be prepared to the job interview. Practice general and challenging interview questions with your peers.  Practice in front of a mirror – don’t be shy! The more prepared you are, the more confident you’ll feel, which will come off during the interview.  While you should practice, be authentic during the actual interview.

NYU Wasserman has plenty of great career resources.  Swing by during walk-in hours for a mini mock interview, or make an appointment with a career counselor. You can find other helpful resources on CareerNet, under the Career Resources tab. Check it out!

Get Ready and Be on Time

The night before do the following:

  • Have your outfit picked out (rule of thumb: dress one or two levels up)

  • Pack your bag

  • Print out extra copies of your resume

  • Get directions to your destination (Check alternative routes)

  • Relax and have a good night’s sleep

The day of the big interview give yourself enough time to arrive. Arrive between 5-7 minutes early. If you’re too early walk around, grab some water, etc. As soon as you walk through the door, all eyes are on you – that means, be polite to everyone, from the receptionist to the person interviewing you.  Remember to put on your best smile!

How to Answer Questions During the Interview?

During the interview make eye contact and answer questions with confidence.  Use the STAR method:

  • Situation – Describe the situation you were in (e.g., the name of the internship or course you were taking)

  • Task – Identify the specific project you were working on and briefly discuss what it entailed

  • Action – This is the most important element! Specifically identify what YOUR action was related to the question that was asked

  • Result – Close the question by stating an outcome to your situation

If you ever find yourself stuck on a question, that’s okay! Say to the interviewer ‘that’s a good question, let me think about it.’ Pause, breathe, think, and then give your answer.

Ask Meaningful Questions

At the close of the interview, the interviewer will always ask if you have any questions for them.  Have about 5-10 questions prepared, but of course, don’t ask questions already answered during the interview.

Below are good examples of what to ask the interviewer.

  1. What qualities do you think are most important for someone to excel in this position?

  2. What do you personally like most about working for this company?

  3. What would be one of the greatest challenges a person in this position would face?

  4. Can you tell me more about the team I’ll be working with?

  5. What are the next steps in the interview process?

Follow Up

Send a thank you email or a letter to your interviewer(s) 24-48 hours after the interview. If you interviewed with more than one person, send tailored individual thank you notes. Reiterate your strengths and your interest in the company. This is also an opportunity to add anything you did not discuss during the interview. As always, thank them for their time and the opportunity.

Good luck!

In Case You Missed It: Day In The Life at Time Inc.

Did you miss a day in the life at Time Inc?  Click on the image below for a recap!

 Follow us on Twitter @NYUWassEmployer for tweets on a day-in-the-life of employees at different organizations. A professional will take over our account for the day and give you live updates about the projects they work on, meetings they attend, and the culture of their office.

How do I dress for a career fair?

By: Garvin Reid

Garvin Reid - Assistant Director at Wasserman Center for Career Development

“How do I dress for a career fair?”

A question so simple yet easily able to become complicated if you overthink it.

When thinking of what to wear for a career fair, think of it just as you would a social gathering in which that one person that you really want to impress will be there. The biggest difference is that instead of it being one person at a social gathering, there will be multiple people you seek to impress and it’s in a professional setting. As such, you want to be sure that none of the little things take you out of the running for the career of your dreams.

Just as you would ensure that your resume is primed and polished, it’s best to make sure that your appearance is as well. Appearing disheveled and messy could make an employer question your attention to detail. This is true for both customer facing and non-customer facing roles. Consider this: a recruiter may think “If this person did not notice their nail polish was chipped, how could they notice the extra 0 in the balance sheet?” Just as details matter in your cover letter, resume, business card, etc. you want to show that same level of care to how you present yourself.

What to wear

Similar to practicing your elevator pitch in the mirror, be sure to check your appearance in the mirror before leaving out for the career fair. Recruiters see attending a career fair as an opportunity to meet with a large amount of students with hopes of hiring a few or sometimes just one. With this in mind, you want your appearance to help rather than hinder you. 

Professional Attire

Suit

It’s always best to wear a business suit to a career fair. It shows that you are a professional and exudes confidence. Although you may be interested in a position at a company that you know has a relaxed dress code, you will never be overdressed when it comes to choosing a business suit for a career fair. What if you find out that the company with the relaxed dress code is no longer hiring yet there are multiple companies in your industry and all of their recruiters came in professional attire? Wearing a business suit allows you mobility at a career fair because wearing one makes you dressed appropriately to speak to anyone. 

In choosing your suit, you want to go for neutral colors (charcoal, navy blue, or gray). Black suits are difficult to make you stand out but if time or money is against you, there is nothing wrong with a black suit if accessorized properly (see below). It’s advised to stay away from the seasonal suits when attending a career fair. These are the seersucker, linen, tweed, etc. Seasonal colored and fabric suits are considered appropriate for a business casual setting rather than business professional. There is some leeway to this rule for women as colors are more acceptable. 

Get your suit dry cleaned and ironed before the career fair. A freshly pressed and cleaned suit literally fits as good as new. This also ensures that there are no stains on your suit just in case you had to get dressed in the dark because you didn’t want to wake your roommate.

Skirts

Ladies, when wearing a skirt to a career fair be mindful of the length. Anything higher than roughly two inches above the knee is considered inappropriate. When choosing a skirt to pair with your blazer you want to keep it professional. Think more “A line” or “Pencil” than “high low” or “mini”. 

Shirts

Your dress shirt is just as important as your suit selection. Consider neutral colors like white, French blue, or even a pale purple if you wish to show school spirit.

Ladies: You have more leeway in this area since you won’t have to worry about matching a tie to your shirt. If choosing to wear a button down shirt, it is important to ensure that it fits well. You want to make sure that it is not too tight which allows your undergarments to show between the buttons. Professionalism is the name of the game here.

Just as with your suit, a clean starched and pressed dress shirt says more positive things about you than a stained wrinkled one. I prefer to iron my shirts but if time is not on your side, you can drop it off at your local cleaner.

Ties

Now that you have your shirt selected, choose a tie that 1. Compliments your suit and shirt and 2. Stands out or has the ability to be a conversation starter. My personal strategy is to wear a solid gray suit; white or French blue shirt, and a conservative bow tie. I call this “Standing out while fitting in”. I’m no statistician but per my experience, if an event has 100 professional men, you are guaranteed to only see at most 10 of them wearing a bow tie. This creates a differentiating impression and also allows you to say “the guy with the bow tie” when you send your follow up e-mails (provided they complimented you on your bow tie of course).

If you’re not ready for a bow tie, fear not, there are other ways to stand out while fitting in.

Accessorize Accordingly

I remember being at a training led by Caroline Gundeck when I was an intern for Morgan Stanley in their Global Wealth Management Internship program. Caroline who is a Managing Director for Ultra High Net Worth Business Development spoke on ways to stand out at networking events. One thing that stuck with me since that training was to “wear a conversation starter”. Caroline explains it as something that is on you that may spark interest in the person that you are speaking to. For Caroline, that conversation piece is a broach, for me it’s been a bow tie and/or pocket square. You never know where that conversation may go or what that person’s perception of you may be after noticing it. The key here though is to subscribe to the mantra of “less is more”. If you are going to wear an interesting piece, let that one piece speak for you. With that said, also ensure that it’s professional.

Here are some examples of accessories you can wear to “stand out while fitting in”

  • Bow tie
  • Bracelet
  • Tie bar
  • Pocket Square
  • School Ring
  • Necklace
  • Silk Scarf
  • Lapel Pin
  • Hair Accessory
  • Broach
  • Earrings
  • Watch

Best Foot Forward

Gentlemen, it is important to ensure that your shoes are not only business professional but also shined and polished. This is particularly true for those of you with interests in the hospitality industry. Most of the customer facing roles within this industry grants their workers with the titles of being ambassadors of the brand. You want to make sure that brand looks neat, clean, and polished at all times.

Ladies, for you it’s not so much about the polish of your shoes as it is important that you choose the right shoe for the career fair. Consider going for the comfortable closed toe pump rather than a flat. With giving consideration to the weather on the day of, it’s best not to wear boots either.

Conclusion

When you think of a career fair, think of “The Hunger Games” you would like to do everything in your power to ensure that “the odds are in your favor”. Dressing the part is the easiest way to do so.  

Now that you know how to dress for a career fair, why not try out your new style. Attend the Fall 2014 NYU School of Professional Studies Hospitality, Tourism and Sports Management Career Fair on Thursday, October 30th. RSVP here!

Dine Your Way into Your Next Job or Internship

By: Diana Martinez

Congratulations on making it to the next round of interviews! Let’s go down the checklist: suit, portfolio, business cards, resumes, dining etiquette…wait, what? That’s right; increasingly employers are holding later round interviews or pre-interview sessions over full-course sit down meals. Definitely expect this if you will be interviewing with any large Fortune 100 or company holding super-days. 

What’s all the fuss?

Besides allowing you to network with prospective colleagues, it offers recruiters a rare opportunity to test your social skills, assess if you are a good match for the organization’s culture, and test how well you deal with stressful and social situations. To help you navigate the sometimes unavoidable mealtime interview, below are some tips to help you shine next time you have one.

Give Your Phone a Break

Turn off or silent your phone. No one likes interruptions. While we’re on the topic: no texting, tweeting, Facebook, or any other social media. Nothing says “I’d rather be anywhere else, but here” than spending more time with the phone than with your host. It’s rude and actually makes you appear antisocial. The focus of your attention during the meal should be your host. This is a great dating tip too!

Pre-Game and Food Selection

Have a small snack before going. If you’re starving, your attention will be on the food instead of networking and making a great impression. Select foods that are not messy and are easy to eat. Some recruiters intentionally select menus that have these danger foods to see how you will navigate this obstacle course. Avoid anything with sauces, anything that will require you use your hands to eat, can be messy, and salads! Yes, salads and foods like kale, and broccoli, can be tough to eat and can lead to awkward conversations when they get stuck in your teeth. There are times when you can’t avoid salads. In that case check out this great Table Manners 101 video on etiquette and other issues such as proper use of utensils and dealing with salads and soups.

Say No to Drinking…Alcohol!

Even if offered, politely decline any alcohol and select water, soda, or other non-alcoholic option. This is another trap! It is used to assess your judgment. And no one likes dining with a drunk, not to mention the smell of it during a professional event!

Mind Your Manners

One can devote an entire series of articles on just this topic. Here are the basics:

  • If you have more than one fork, begin from the outside and work your way in
  • BMW: Remember this acronym and you’ll never mix up your water, salad, or bread with your neighbor’s. Starting from your left is Bread and salad, in the center is your Meal plate, and to your right is your Water glass. This graphic is also helpful to remember.

 

  • If anything falls on the floor (napkin, utensils, etc.) it stays on the floor. It is acceptable to ask the wait staff for another one
  • Never talk with your mouth full
  • No slurping or blowing on your soup
  • Cut food into small bite sizes and bring them to your mouth
  • When you do speak and/or need to put down your utensils, never put them on your napkin or table — instead place them on your plate
  • Keep your elbows off the table
  • Leave some food on your plate at the end of your meal and never request a “doggy bag” to take home – no matter how much food is leftover or how delicious the meal is! 

Learn to Make Small Talk

Get this down and you’ll have a strong advantage. We all have stories where we just looked at another person across the table and smiled in awkward silence. Here’s how to avoid that: do your homework. Research the company, industry, and current events in news and other areas. This will allow you to discuss an array of topics. Unless you are interviewing for a position to be a lobbyist, stay clear of religion, politics, or anything that can be turned into a debate. Bonus tip: People love talking about themselves. So, you can never go wrong with asking someone what they do at their organization, how they got where they are, and why they work at that company.

Say Thanks

At the conclusion of any interview, you should ask for a business card and follow up within 48 hours with a thank you letter or e-mail. This is no different. Your host went through a lot of trouble; the least you could do is thank them! You would be surprised how many people forget to do it and this is the reason why they don’t get called back for a follow-up interview.

Those Who Invite Pay…To a Point

The company will pay for the meal. It is expected. So, when the bill arrives, no one is expecting you to offer to pay nor is acceptable to offer to split the bill or leave the tip. That said, this doesn’t mean you order the most expensive menu item. Follow your host’s lead. If your host doesn’t make a suggestion or asks you to order first (another clever pitfall), you can never go wrong by ordering meals that fall between the cheapest and most expensive. Bonus Tip: Since the restaurant’s name will be provided to you ahead of time, look it up online and review their menu and price list. Plan what you want to eat and have a back-up in case the item is not available.

Practice, Practice, Practice!

The great thing about a mock interview is you can rehearse interviewing and make mistakes in a safe environment. The same holds true for dining. One fantastic way is by taking advantage of opportunities to combine all your interview skills with small talk and dining. In November, The Wasserman Center will be holding its signature event: Dining for Success. If you’re serious about nailing that next job, attend this event. You can be sure your competition will!

Here’s more information about the event:

Dining for Success (For Juniors, Seniors and Graduate Students)

Thursday, November 6, 5:30 p.m.-8:00 p.m. The Smith, 55 Third Avenue, between 10th and 11th

IN-PERSON REGISTRATION AND REFUNDABLE CASH DEPOSIT REQUIRED! Dateline to register is Thursday, October 30th!

Enjoy a great three-course meal with top employers and the Wasserman Center at the Smith! Mastering interviewing skills is hard enough, but what about when your interview is over a meal? Don’t let your dining etiquette stand in the way of getting the job! Join NYU Recruiters from Ernst & Young, PwC, AOL, Peace Corps and more to practice these skills over a three-course meal!

Additional Resources:

Mu Sigma – Grow fast in this innovative work environment!

Author: Prashant Suryakumar

Back in 2008 when I was graduating from the UT MBA program, I had a choice to make – continue in telecom and join a Fortune 500 organization in the economic modeling team, or take a chance on a Data Analytics consulting startup. Fortunately for me my desire to try consulting gave me the confidence to get out of my comfort zone and join Mu Sigma. Boy – has it been a ride over the last 6 years! I’ve had numerous “company building” experiences, opportunities to directly interact with CXOs, manage 100+ member teams and run a $10+ million P&L, while helping the company grow 30X in revenues.

They say one in ten startups succeed, and perhaps my circumstances were different from today – So in preparation for this blog post, I decided to interview a few of my colleagues who joined Mu Sigma as part of the MSU 2013 batch.

(All fresh hires, irrespective of background are sent to our Austin office for a 6 week bootcamp conducted by the Mu Sigma University, where the basics of problem solving, advanced statistics and business are taught followed by real world consulting engagement exercises. You then go to your client location where, a combination of self-learning modules, live engagements, mentors and client interactions harden your newfound decision sciences skills.)

Here’s a synthesis of experiences they had, and you should expect if you choose to join Mu Sigma.

  • Drink out of a fire hose: Mu Sigma is a learning organization, we prioritize learning over knowing. What few people realize before joining is the breadth of learning. You will learn statistics, presentation skills, problem solving across multiple industries through first principle thinking, and extensive research. In parallel you learn how to work with clients, people management, and most importantly time management. Work will fill as much time you give it, and in the process you learn about yourself and your limits.

  • Work with a Smart Diverse crowd: Candidates are selected from the top schools in the US based on their clarity of thought and ability to learn. Expect a lot of debates!

  • Work with global teams: Ever played the game Telephone? Working with teams around the world is playing telephone in real life. Ensuring this works well requires communication through multiple channels and is an exercise in being precise in setting expectations, but broad while giving context.

  • Very high exposure / responsibility: Within 8 weeks of joining Mu Sigma, you should be expected to interact with middle management of Fortune 100 clients, providing recommendations on multimillion dollar decisions. No pressure.

  • Appreciation of failures: the training program, and most of the first year is a sandbox to learn, fail and learn again. There is significant support both in the US and from India operations to help you in your projects. All that is expected is initiative.

Mu Sigma is like a college after college. The ecosystem is young, energetic and constantly evolving. From what I have seen, there couldn’t be a better transition from university to corporate life.

If you are interested in exploring Mu Sigma some more or leaving behind a footprint in the Mu Sigma story, visit us at

http://www.mu-sigma.com/analytics/people/careers/Americas.html to learn more.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO MEET WITH Mu Sigma, STOP BY THEIR BOOTH AT THE Engineering & Technology Career FAIR. RSVP THROUGH NYU CAREERNET BY CLICKING HERE!

Profile of a Wasserman Center Internship Grant Recipient

Julie Yoon is a Steinhardt student working as a Multimedia Intern at the Clinton Foundation. As a past recipient of the Wasserman Center Internship Grant, she shares some insight into the value of applying for the Grant, and offers some tips to further your candidacy.

Best part of winning the WCIG: Because my internship was full-time, I knew that it would be difficult to secure a paying job. As we all know, living in NYC is very expensive and the Wasserman Center Internship Grant eased my overall stress and allowed me to focus on my internship.

Most challenging or rewarding part of your internship: Interning at the Clinton Foundation allowed me to continue my commitment to mission-driven media making. One of the most rewarding parts of my internship was working with people who are driven by the same mission that I firmly believe in. It motivated and inspired me everyday while I practiced my editing and visual storytelling skills.

Good advice for others applying for the WCIG: To those who are applying for the Wasserman Center Internship Grant, I would advise to form candid relationships with their mentors or supervisors. Let them know that you are passionate about your internship and that you are there to learn. This will not only show in your application but also in the supervisor’s recommendation.

Non-paying internship survival 101 tip: Live in the moment. Yes, you won’t get paid, but you will learn a lot and discover something new about yourself. Make your experience invaluable!

Are you interning this semester? Whether or not you are getting paid, take Julie’s advice on forming relationships with mentors and supervisors. If your internship is non-paying, and at a not-for-profit organization or within an industry that does not typically pay interns (arts, entertainment, media, education), apply now for the Wasserman Center Internship Grant. Apply here by Sep 30th at 11:59pm: NYU CareerNet Job ID #927342.

Tips for Wrapping Up Your Internship on a Positive Note

Nicole Klein Isenhour, Assistant Director at The Wasserman Center for Career Development at NYU-Poly, offers forth some tips for completing your internship.

You’re nearing the end of your internship so it must be time to throw caution to the wind right? WRONG…the final days, weeks, hours of your summer internship are equally as important as your first, if not more! How you leave things off will the employer will leave a lasting impression and set the stage for things moving forward. You always want to end things on a good note and have the employer remember your hard work all summer. Wrapping up the right way can lead to references, recommendations, mentorship, keeping in touch and most importantly: potential consideration for future positions down the line. Not sure what to do? No problem, that’s where we come in with the top 5 tips for wrapping up your internship.

  • Make sure your projects are covered– Finish as much as you can but in the event you are leaving before a project is finished, leave strong documentation so that your coworkers can pick up where you left off or a new person can come in and know what you have already done or what needs to be done. Your coworkers will appreciate you keeping them in the loop and leaving thorough notes.
  • Schedule a final meeting with your supervisor – Review what you have done; projects, your goals moving forward, advice they might have for you in terms of professional development. Mention what you have learned and how this experience has been valuable to you.
  • Ask for constructive feedback – Is there anything you did really well and are there areas for improvement that you could work on moving forward? A thing or two you might be able to improve upon? It shows the employer that you are mature, that you care about your growth and development and that you want to continue to improve and succeed.
  • Thank everyone– Thank your supervisor but also thank anyone else you reported to and perhaps some you did not report to but wanted to thank for the experience, such as higher ups in the company. Ask for a few minutes of their time to drop in and discuss your internship. Use this time to informationally network, share what you learned, how you grew from your time there. Ask to keep in touch in the future, after the internship concludes. Also thank your fellow interns, coworkers and any other staff that contributed to your positive experience. Appreciation goes a long way and leaves a lasting impression. Send handwritten thank you notes as well!
  • Stay connected– Send a hello email every month or 2 to the employer. See what they have been doing in the news or what is happening in the industry to use as some talking points, forward an article that might be applicable to their business and of interest to them. This shows you are invested and care about keeping up with industry trends and current events. You can also share something relevant you did in a class, a group project, a conference you attended, share it!

As always, feel free to make an appointment through CareerNet and come by the Wasserman Center for Career Development to discuss your personal internship experience and career goals/ next steps!

Summer Spotlight Series with Talent Tech

Did you miss Executive Director, Jonathan’s, day at Talent Tech Labs? If so, click on the logo below for a recap.

Sound like a place you’d like to work? Check out the openings on CareerNet: Job IDs: 939426 and 917366.

Summer Internship at AllianceBernstein, Part II

Aziza Sultan is a current NYU student in the accelerated Bachelor’s/Master’s program. She is studying politics for her Bachelor’s degree and concentrating on political economy for her Master’s. She is currently a summer intern at AllianceBernstein’s New York City midtown offices in the Technology and Operations Program. Some interesting internships she has done in the past include interning on location in Kabul, Afghanistan with a firm on a U.S. military literacy contract for Afghan National Police and Army, and at the Nassau County District Attorney’s Office under District Attorney Kathleen Rice. Here, she offers forth some thoughts on the second half of her experience at AllianceBernstein. Click here to read her earlier post.

In my final few days interning at AllianceBernstein, I am surprised at how quickly ten weeks have gone by. In that time, I have learned a lot about derivatives and about operations and have been mentored both officially and unofficially by people in the organization. This spirit of unofficial mentorship was present both among people who were in groups different from mine and also across various positions of seniority throughout the firm.  Most people don’t get to describe their internship as interesting or inspiring. Mine was both.

Since I last wrote part one of my blog about a month ago, I have attended a plethora of events – some catered to interns and others for everyone at the firm. One skill that the program has focused on refining for the interns is presenting and public speaking. The Technology and Operations internship program hosted a multi-hour class led by a professional coach and a Broadway theater actress who comes to the firm to work with employees about connecting with audiences, building content, and the various psychological elements of delivering a speech. This was followed by multiple drills where we exercised what we had just learned. This was especially helpful to myself, as someone who had joined the firm’s Toastmaster’s Club, which aims to improve the communication, public speaking and leadership skills of its members. The club warmly welcomed me, and I signed up to deliver an ice breaker speech at one of their bi-monthly meetings. Not only was this was a great way to meet other people at the firm but it also gave me a chance to exercise my newly learned skills from the course and have the people I worked amongst learn a little more about me on a personal level. I also got written feedback from each person in attendance which was a helpful way to learn about what I needed to work on as a public speaker, in addition to my strengths.

Interns and incoming associates were also treated to a networking reception with senior leaders at AllianceBernstein. It has been really useful to meet with people who work in the different moving parts of the firm because I’ve come to realize that though the organizational structure of the firm is such that there are different divisions that may not work together day to day, collaboration from time to time with people from different divisions on larger projects is necessary and adds variety to the type of work people do. Also, just as a curious person who has a vested interest in the larger organization and workings of the company, it’s useful to know people who do different things than myself. This curiosity led me to schedule meetings with dozens of people across the firm (in groups including Equities, Private Client, Sanford C. Bernstein research roles, Multi Asset Solutions, Fixed Income and more) to learn more about what they do and how their work is important, interesting and makes a difference.

In my group, I was trained and in contact regularly with my mentor and manager, both of whom gave me increasing responsibility on a day to day basis within my group. A moment in which I recognized that my work within our group was meaningful was when my train was stalled in a station as a result of an investigation and I became increasingly worried as each minute passed that I wouldn’t be able to send the early morning email to one of the brokers who I was working with on a daily basis to reconcile company business. (I emailed my mentor and manager as I was on the train to let them know of the situation).  One of the interesting projects our team was involved in was planning the switching of the software system that the derivative operations team would be using in regards to collateral.

Overall, the internship was valuable because I not only learned about the work of the company, but I learned that the people here are proud of what they do and care about each other. A nice end to the summer program was seeing the rotational associates, whom with interns worked closely, graduate to their next positions. The program included a presentation and graduation ceremony for the associates, as well as a reception afterwards.

On a personal note, I’d like to thank the people I’ve come in contact with throughout the course of the internship. In particular, the people who I’ve worked closely with – my manager Brian Mullen, mentor May Hu, and an associate in my group Darren Breda. I’d also like to thank the people I sit by (specifically Christian Paine, Mark Tarnok, Walter Kowalewski and Amro Shabaan) for being so encouraging and welcoming. Thanks to Gaetano DiMiceli, for allowing me to a part of his incredible team. Last but not least, a very special thanks to Erinn Goldenberg and Eshrat Jahan for making this internship experience as seamless and fulfilling as they did!

Being Part of the PepsiCo Family

Carmiel Dizon is an NYU Stern Management and Marketing student graduating in 2015. This summer, she’s here to share some of her thoughts about interning with PepsiCo.

Stepping onto the PepsiCo shuttle to White Plains, I feel the intensity of each heartbeat as adrenaline punches through my veins. With each reverberating ‘click’ of my shoes, all I focus on are those revolving doors, the gates toward something unknown. Dozens of people dressed in suits and casual jeans groggily shuffle to the revolving doors after a long commute. While waiting my turn to pass the shiny glass gates, my mind explodes into a symphony consisting of fears and dread- only to be followed by the mellowing clam of those doors. As the individual in front of me passes through, I clench myself in anticipation and pass on through. The first of many trials passes ushering a wave of relief and excitement until twenty curious pairs of eyes dart toward me. Nervousness grips me once more. Like any first day, the waltz of nervousness clashes with the rumba of excitement. Yet despite the conflict of emotions raging within my heart, the soothing wave of belonging sets in. Calamity dissipates as the fears subside. The image ingrained into my mind elicits an emotional comfort of something like home- a place of belonging.

After the steady routine of sipping coffee and walking through the lobby adorned with familiar logos depicting Pepsi and Tropicana, I feel less like an outsider. Four weeks later, I come to appreciate the challenges associated with marketing. Each task not only allows me to reinforce and expand my knowledge, but also allows for continuous improvement. Though my experience has been brief, my own conception of marketing practices amplifies given a unique set of opportunities. A few weeks ago I attended Dew Tour, an action sports event powered by Mountain Dew, where I witnessed the myriad of theories being implemented and redefined in practice. A soda became more than just a beverage. It brings people together through emphasizing a unique lifestyle that connects with an audience on a deeper, and more emotional level.

My experience at PepsiCo must be understood as a shift in my understanding of community. The comradery shared by employees quickly permeated into the intern sphere of culture. Not even two weeks into my internship, I felt fully immersed as a full-time member of my team. During agency calls, my manager always asks for my opinion. He values any creative input I am able to muster, which results in greater confidence of my own abilities. Feeling important and valued by management is imperative to my success. For instance, while waiting for the 4 train, I can approach a colleague and immediately feel welcomed. As the conversation delves into an exchange between weekend plans after exchanging pleasantries, I can only imagine who I was at the beginning. That fear and nervous anticipation has been replaced by the familiarity of a community- a community I am a part of. At PepsiCo, I’m treated more than an intern. I’m treated like a member of the Pepsi family. For that, I am truly grateful and definitely ready for what is yet to come. First days are always intimidating, but are nothing more than the first gate into tomorrow. A tomorrow of growth nurtured through hardship and supported by those with a single goal in mind… success.

Want to find an internship, part-time job, or full-time position? Make an appointment through CareerNet to meet with a career coach and start exploring all of the available and exciting opportunities.