Tag Archives: student perspectives

Career Tips to Beat the Winter Break Blues

Unless you’re that lucky NYU student who spends winter break traversing the streets of Paris, jet skiing in the Caribbean, or even staying busy with J-term, it may just be that time of year again.  The time of year where the initial Netflix binge begins to slow, meals from the holidays are finally finishing digestion, and all your friends from home start trickling back to their respective schools, leaving you wondering what in the world you should do with your life. I digress.  Fortunately, I’ve come to find that winter break can be the perfect time to ensure that you’re set for the coming months.  Whether you’re looking for a part-time job, a spring semester/summer internship, or even full-time employment, a few hours of work amid your slew of down time can do wonders. Below you’ll find a few tips to help spice up your professional development over winter break.

1.    Update your resume.

We’ve seen it before: you’ve spent hours adding to your resume, coming up with the perfect format, describing your amazing work and contributions to companies/overall society in just one page, and you’re feeling great about yourself… until you realize that was done over a year ago. A lot’s happened since then, so get to updating!

2.    Creating/updating your LinkedIn page.

For those of you who have yet to hop on the LinkedIn train, there’s no better time than now. Set up your profile and begin making connections.  If you already have a LinkedIn account but (ahem,) haven’t given it a glance in weeks, the time has come my friend.

3.    Get organized: Make Lists.

Organize lists of companies you’re interested in, what you’re looking to get out of employment, locations you’d like to explore, application deadlines, and other general attributes to your professional future.  Making lists can provide clarity, organize to your thoughts, and help you figure out what your next steps should be as you seek employment.

4.    Consider a personal website.

Across disciplines, students and authorities alike have been creating personal websites in order to market themselves professionally. Consider this option and look into some resources for finding ways to build a personal website. (There are both free and costly options out there. Spend some time on Google or speak to a Wasserman Career Coach for more information.)

5.     Network

Reach out to people in your network and express interest in getting more experience in your respective field. You never know how far a simple question or a “hello” can go!

6.    Meet with a Wasserman Career Coach

Whether it’s in person or remotely, winter break is a great time to meet with a career coach to talk in greater detail about your goals for the coming year. By planning ahead, and taking a few moments out of your break to spice up your professional life, you can be steps ahead in the game.

These are just a few tips to help you plan for the rest of the year. If you have any specific questions, feel free to meet with a Wasserman Career Coach. View the Wasserman website for more information on winter break walk-in hours and remote meetings for those outside of NYC. But most importantly, enjoy your winter break! I’m sure there’s something new on Netflix for you to get addicted to.

Once you return from break, make sure to attend our spring career fairs! Information is below:

Spring Job & Internship Fair

Thursday January 29, 2015 11am – 3pm | NYU Kimmel Center

Take advantage of this opportunity to meet with employers hiring for summer internships and full-time positions in various industries!

Engineering & Technology Fall Fair

Thursday, February 12, 2015 11am – 3pm | NYU Brooklyn Campus, Jacobs Gymnasium

NYU Students are invited to explore full-time, part-time, and internship opportunities in a variety of fields, including engineering, computer hardware/software, technology, science, management, and digital media.

Download employer information on The Career Fair Plus app, featuring: 

  • · Complete company listing
  • · Interactive Floor Plan
  • · Event Details
  • · Announcements for real-time updates
  • · Career Fair tips section to help you prepare

Search for the NYU Career Fair Plus app on Google Play or iTunes

terri (2).jpg 

Terri Burns is a junior studying computer science in CAS. This year, Terri is on the communications team with her fellow Peer in Careers. Outside of her work with Wasserman, Terri is a Resident Assistant in Carlyle Court, a Google Student Ambassador, and heavily involved with NYC’s largest student technology organization, Tech@NYU.

 

Student Perspective: How to Stay Productive During Thanksgiving Break

By: Claudia Enriquez

Claudia Enriquez is a second year student receiving her Masters in Public Administration from NYU Wagner. She currently works as a Graduate Program Assistant at NYU Wasserman. She is a New Yorker at heart, growing up in Long Island, then moving to upstate New York to attend college, and now she’s back downstate and enjoying her time at NYU.

Before (or after) your food coma from all of the Thanksgiving goodies, take advantage of your Thanksgiving break to start your internship search! These helpful tips will give you a head start with your internship preparation.

Research and secure your Spring or Summer 2015 internship

Don’t be disheartened if you haven’t secured a spring internship yet – there is still time! Companies are still looking for interns to fill spots so do your research and search for companies that are hiring.  Check out CareerNet and other job search engines such as idealist.org and indeed.com.

Prepare for your Summer 2015 internship by researching various options. Block off time to sit down and reflect on the type of internship opportunities you’re most interested in. Do your homework, but don’t send out applications just yet. Most employers are off during the holiday and you don’t want your application getting overlooked.

Organize Your Job Search

Keep track of the companies you research and where you send off applications. It’s important to keep yourself organized to stay on top of your job search process. Create either an excel or word document template with the information below. This will really help you when you start sending out batches of applications after break.

  • Company Name – The name of the organization
  • Contact – The point of contact at the company
  • Email/Phone Number – Point of contact information
  • Application Deadline – Last day to submit your application
  • Date Applied – When you submitted your application
  • Position Title – What position you applied/are applying for
  • Application Summary – What you submitted with your application (resume, cover letter, etc.)
  • Interview – When your interview is scheduled
  • Follow-up – Whether or not you sent a thank you email or letter after the interview
  • Status – If you were rejected, offered the job, pending, etc.

Update your resume

If you haven’t updated your resume since the start of the Fall semester or prior, take advantage of your free time now to do so! Don’t wait until you find your dream job or internship to update your resume. Keep your resume up-to-date so you’re not editing at the very last minute and continue to add your experiences along the way.

Make sure your resume stands out! Have peers look over your resume and visit a Career Coach at Wasserman when you come back from break. If you’re a graduating senior, take advantage of the Resume Book Collection!

Enjoy Thanksgiving break

Lastly, enjoy your break! Spend time with family and friends, and have a great Thanksgiving!

 

 

 

 

Sources: http://jobsearch.about.com/od/findajob/ss/How-To-Organize-Your-Job-Search_2.htm#step-heading

 

Student Perspective: “What’s Next? Entrepreneurship” Panel Discussion Recap

By: Indra N. Kar

Born and raised in Connecticut, Indra N. Kar is a senior in CAS. He is pursuing a B.A. in Economics with minors in Mathematics and Chemistry. In addition to being a Peer in Career at Wasserman, he is involved on campus as the Treasurer of the Medical Dialogue Review and a member of TEDxNYU’s Finance Team.

The “What’s Next? Entrepreneurship” Panel Discussion took place on November 5, 2014 at the new Leslie eLab. It was a very informative program that was organized by Wasserman and co-sponsored by the Entrepreneurship and Innovation Association (EIA) and the NYU Entrepreneurial Institute. As a senior majoring in Economics with an interest in business, I was curious to hear what the panelists had to say regarding startups and the entrepreneurial world.

 

There were three key takeaways from the seminar:

Why to Become an Entrepreneur:

A couple of the panelists worked in the financial services industry prior to creating their own start-ups. In fact, both of them left the industry during the height of the financial crisis to find something where they could control their own destinies. Another panelist was happy to leave his cold-calling job prior to his entrepreneurial endeavors. The three of them expressed a desire to directly observe the results of their work. Whether it was finance or cold calling, they had difficulty seeing the impact they were having on people’s lives. However, by starting their own businesses, they experienced more person-to-person interactions. This allowed them to observe the ways they were affecting individuals’ lives and the influence they were having on the final product. 

Learning from Failure:

The unpredictability of a start-up’s success can lead many to shy away from starting a business. However, the speakers emphasized that failure can teach you several things including your own personal weaknesses, the business strategies that don’t work, and the fact that the best ideas are often organic ideas. 

Furthermore, the majority of the panel believed that the journey and the end result are equally important. Along the way, experience is the best teacher. You can either let past failures discourage you, or you can learn from them and move on. One of the panelists described entrepreneurship as “a state of mind,” which I think nicely captured the emotional aspect of innovation.

Qualities of a Successful Entrepreneur:

Words and phrases that repeatedly came up during the discussion were “risk taking,” “focus,” “curiosity,” and “creativity.” From the discussion, it appeared that the work of a successful entrepreneur is reflective of these four things.

The riskiness of starting your own business is inherent. You are starting something from scratch, often times without a lot of capital in the beginning. In order to secure a significant amount of funding, you need to prove yourself first. You have to find the right business partners, and sometimes, you have student debt to worry about paying off. But, how will you know success if you don’t try?

This is where the risk-taking nature and the ability to maintain focus come in handy for an entrepreneur. The panelists generally agreed that entrepreneurs need to have goals in mind and keep striving until the goals are met. Intellectual curiosity is another source of motivation that they mentioned. It helps jumpstart your creativity, which can help you think on your feet when something doesn’t go as planned. The success of a start-up is not guaranteed, but the panelists believed that the right qualities and right attitude could help you become a successful entrepreneur.

Have you attended or plan to attend one of Wasserman’s events, and would like to be featured on our blog? Let us know! Email us at career.communications@nyu.edu.

Student Recap: Using Your HR Degree to Enhance Your Career – Human Resources Panel

Written by:  Brenda D. Sackerman, Master’s candidate, HRMD Program, 2014

On Friday, September 19, the NYU Wasserman Center at the School of Professional Studies and the NYU SHRM Chapter hosted a panel of NYU alumni who discussed how they used their MS in Human Resource Management & Development to enhance their careers.  The panel consisted of NYU HRMD alumni and students currently working in the HR industry:

Kristen Leising – Managing Director of Talent and Engagement Solutions at Teach for America

Darlene Meier – Director of Human Resources at L’Oreal

Alejandra Olivella – Senior Manager of HR at adMarketplace

Jonathan Serbin – HR Generalist at NYU College of Dentistry

The diverse background and experience of the panelists allowed them to provide excellent insight on how to best leverage your NYU Master’s degree as well as tips for success in the HR field.  Here’s a quick re-cap on the valuable advice they dispensed:

Network, network, network:

Networking is a major key to success.  There are valuable opportunities to build your network constantly around you; don’t overlook the connections you’re making with your classmates.  Additionally, attend as many events as possible and follow through in making connections.  Build genuine relationships and remember to protect your brand and reputation.  Be able to discuss current event, show that you understand business, and get yourself invited into someone else’s world.

Know the basics:

Strengthen your skills in the basic core and administrative aspects of HR, especially if you are near the beginning of your career.  The strategic role that HR plays is extremely important.  However, in order to reach the senior level where strategy alignment is a driving force, most of us will have to move through generalist roles first.  Being well versed in the basics, specifically compensation, benefits and employment law is just as valuable as understanding business strategy.  It is also critical to leverage the skills developed in classes like financial management to discuss figures like ROI and understand valuable metrics and spreadsheets.

Know the business:

HR is the driver of the company culture.  To be successful, you must learn the business, know the industry and establish trust.  Business cannot run without people, but we must be mindful to not be too business or too people focused.  We must build close working relationships through trust and credibility.  A way to build credibility is to apply cost implications for every initiative.  For example, the VP of finance doesn’t want to hear “people are unhappy and unproductive” but would be interested in your ideas to increase revenue.  Another way to learn the business is through rotation programs.  This can increase your marketability and your understanding of the industry.

Diversity is valuable:

Be able to balance who you are, your background and your knowledge.  Be able to leverage your background and find companies who value it as well as recruiters that understand what you can bring to the table.  It is also recommended to take advantage of the Wasserman Center’s assistance in “Perfecting Your Global Brand.”  Diversity is becoming increasingly important as globalization also increases.  Being able to manage inclusion and cultural diversity is a skill that will continue to increase in value.

How to get ahead:

Every day you earn your job but to get a promotion you must go beyond that.  Show that you’ve earned it and that you don’t just expect to be given opportunities.  In addition to networking and looking for opportunities, taking on a new project should help to get you noticed.  Be sure to set a goal and have a business case.  Have an internal mentor as well as an external mentor who will keep you true to your vision.  Have a champion in house that will provide you with support.  Remember, managers execute a plan but directors design the plan.

DON’T MISS OUT ON EVENTS LIKE THIS! SIGN UP FOR THE WASSERMAN STUDENT E-NEWSLETTER BY CLICKING HERE!

 

Student Perspective: Wasserman Center Connecting with Graduate Students

Mai Huynh is a Master’s student in the Industrial/Organizational Psychology program at GSAS. In case you missed it, below she recaps the Graduate Student Welcome Reception at Wasserman.

This year, the Wasserman Center is making an active effort to connect with graduate students by introducing them to its resources right when they first arrive on campus. On August 28th, the Wasserman Center hosted a Graduate Student Welcome Reception filled with lots of food and information. The idea for the welcome reception came from the creative brainstorming efforts of the Wasserman Graduate Student Advisory Board, a group of student representatives doing the NYU graduate community proud by coming up with amazing ways to professionally develop students.

Over 180 graduates from GSAS, Steinhart, Nursing, School of Professional Studies, and Polytechnic School of Engineering (to name a few) participated in the event. They heard from Richard Orbe-Austin, the new Director of Graduate Student Career Development and learned about how to schedule a career coaching appointment, register for on-campus recruitment (OCR), and sign up for career seminars and events.

During the session, graduate students were given an opportunity to network with their peers and discuss the different roles they play in their life, such as graduate student, son/daughter, city-dweller, etc. The reception concluded with a guided tour of Wasserman’s facilities. Students were ecstatic to find out where they could grab some free coffee. Overall, it was a great day and fantastic way to spread the word about what Wasserman can do for graduate students.

Are you a graduate student at NYU? Take these steps to get connected with our office: 

Student Perspective: ICAP’s Summer Internship Program

I initially applied to ICAP’s summer internship program after hearing about the company from a close friend, as well as people in related industries.

My main interest was to secure a client-facing role within a financial services organization after graduation. I wanted to work for an organization that was both innovative and imparted responsibility upon young employees; both of which I had been informed was possible at ICAP. After rotating on several desks in both Global Broking and Electronic Markets during my summer internship, I was offered and accepted a role within EBS, which is an electronic foreign exchange platform. This was a Junior Account Executive role, with responsibility for an account, as well as dealing with all of the clients’ needs from a trading perspective. Typically this involves client visits to demonstrate new trading functionality on the platform, building relationships with everyone from the manual traders on the desk, to the e-commerce teams and the billing department. Essentially, anything that the client needs or has queries about, we take care of. This ensures that the role is diverse. Each day is different.

At the beginning of the graduate program we were on a 3 week training program which covered a multitude of different financial products. This training was vital in providing the breadth and depth of knowledge across asset classes; knowledge that is becoming increasingly important where electronic platforms are operating as multi-product services. Having access to the learning material via an online portal has also been a great help, particularly when wanting to brush up on products which are emerging into my daily role and products that will be more prominent in the future. Continuous training has also been provided on softer skills, which has been very helpful in managing my personal brand.

I have been very fortunate to be given a significant amount of responsibility at a very early stage. Today, 12 months after joining the graduate scheme, I now have multiple accounts that I manage across many cities including Moscow and Amsterdam, to name a few. Being able to travel to those places is one of the aspects that I enjoy the most about my role. The variety of learning about new markets, the politics that is linked to them, and the culture of each city, is a great experience which really expands your knowledge and perspective in general. Many challenges also arise when this much responsibility is given. Firstly, managing to juggle all the tasks that need to be completed as well as maintaining relationships in multiple countries at the same time is pretty difficult; especially when you’re travelling with work to Moscow, and still dealing with queries back in London. However, this is what makes the role multi-faceted and ensures greater personal development.

ICAP is a pretty unique company. Within its umbrella there are many companies where each desk / product is exciting in different ways. Having this choice is great, as the graduate recruitment team helps to match up graduates with the personalities of each desk, to ensure a good fit. I’m glad I made the choice to join ICAP’s team; my experience has been better than I could have anticipated it would be.

To find out more about ICAP, the kind of people we’re looking for, and to apply, visit www.icapcampusrecruitment.com.

Summer Spotlight Series with Talent Tech

Did you miss Executive Director, Jonathan’s, day at Talent Tech Labs? If so, click on the logo below for a recap.

Sound like a place you’d like to work? Check out the openings on CareerNet: Job IDs: 939426 and 917366.

Summer Internship at AllianceBernstein, Part II

Aziza Sultan is a current NYU student in the accelerated Bachelor’s/Master’s program. She is studying politics for her Bachelor’s degree and concentrating on political economy for her Master’s. She is currently a summer intern at AllianceBernstein’s New York City midtown offices in the Technology and Operations Program. Some interesting internships she has done in the past include interning on location in Kabul, Afghanistan with a firm on a U.S. military literacy contract for Afghan National Police and Army, and at the Nassau County District Attorney’s Office under District Attorney Kathleen Rice. Here, she offers forth some thoughts on the second half of her experience at AllianceBernstein. Click here to read her earlier post.

In my final few days interning at AllianceBernstein, I am surprised at how quickly ten weeks have gone by. In that time, I have learned a lot about derivatives and about operations and have been mentored both officially and unofficially by people in the organization. This spirit of unofficial mentorship was present both among people who were in groups different from mine and also across various positions of seniority throughout the firm.  Most people don’t get to describe their internship as interesting or inspiring. Mine was both.

Since I last wrote part one of my blog about a month ago, I have attended a plethora of events – some catered to interns and others for everyone at the firm. One skill that the program has focused on refining for the interns is presenting and public speaking. The Technology and Operations internship program hosted a multi-hour class led by a professional coach and a Broadway theater actress who comes to the firm to work with employees about connecting with audiences, building content, and the various psychological elements of delivering a speech. This was followed by multiple drills where we exercised what we had just learned. This was especially helpful to myself, as someone who had joined the firm’s Toastmaster’s Club, which aims to improve the communication, public speaking and leadership skills of its members. The club warmly welcomed me, and I signed up to deliver an ice breaker speech at one of their bi-monthly meetings. Not only was this was a great way to meet other people at the firm but it also gave me a chance to exercise my newly learned skills from the course and have the people I worked amongst learn a little more about me on a personal level. I also got written feedback from each person in attendance which was a helpful way to learn about what I needed to work on as a public speaker, in addition to my strengths.

Interns and incoming associates were also treated to a networking reception with senior leaders at AllianceBernstein. It has been really useful to meet with people who work in the different moving parts of the firm because I’ve come to realize that though the organizational structure of the firm is such that there are different divisions that may not work together day to day, collaboration from time to time with people from different divisions on larger projects is necessary and adds variety to the type of work people do. Also, just as a curious person who has a vested interest in the larger organization and workings of the company, it’s useful to know people who do different things than myself. This curiosity led me to schedule meetings with dozens of people across the firm (in groups including Equities, Private Client, Sanford C. Bernstein research roles, Multi Asset Solutions, Fixed Income and more) to learn more about what they do and how their work is important, interesting and makes a difference.

In my group, I was trained and in contact regularly with my mentor and manager, both of whom gave me increasing responsibility on a day to day basis within my group. A moment in which I recognized that my work within our group was meaningful was when my train was stalled in a station as a result of an investigation and I became increasingly worried as each minute passed that I wouldn’t be able to send the early morning email to one of the brokers who I was working with on a daily basis to reconcile company business. (I emailed my mentor and manager as I was on the train to let them know of the situation).  One of the interesting projects our team was involved in was planning the switching of the software system that the derivative operations team would be using in regards to collateral.

Overall, the internship was valuable because I not only learned about the work of the company, but I learned that the people here are proud of what they do and care about each other. A nice end to the summer program was seeing the rotational associates, whom with interns worked closely, graduate to their next positions. The program included a presentation and graduation ceremony for the associates, as well as a reception afterwards.

On a personal note, I’d like to thank the people I’ve come in contact with throughout the course of the internship. In particular, the people who I’ve worked closely with – my manager Brian Mullen, mentor May Hu, and an associate in my group Darren Breda. I’d also like to thank the people I sit by (specifically Christian Paine, Mark Tarnok, Walter Kowalewski and Amro Shabaan) for being so encouraging and welcoming. Thanks to Gaetano DiMiceli, for allowing me to a part of his incredible team. Last but not least, a very special thanks to Erinn Goldenberg and Eshrat Jahan for making this internship experience as seamless and fulfilling as they did!

Summer Spotlight Series with Opportunity Finance Network

Recently, Caroline Deng, Stern ’17, shared her day working with @OppFinance. Click the logo below for a recap.

Keep tuning into our blog throughout the next few months for more spotlights on summer jobs and internships.

Google Community Leaders

Ethan Rosenberg is a junior at Loyola University New Orleans, where he’s participated in Google’s Community Leaders Program for the past two years. The CLP is focused on creating a sustainable web ecosystem and increasing digital literacy by connecting communities, businesses, entrepreneurs, and nonprofits with local student talent. Below, Ethan describes his experiences in the program, which is currently recruiting NYU students for its Harlem chapter.

For the past two years, I’ve had the opportunity to work with the Google Community Leaders Program in New Orleans. When our team first came together in September 2012, we were briefed with the following statistic:

Ninety-seven percent of internet users look online for local products, services, or charitable opportunities, yet 64 percent of businesses in Louisiana do not have a website.

If the vast majority of people are searching for local products and services online, and a business doesn’t have a web presence, they are virtually invisible in the eyes of the consumer.

So, 16 of us from four universities were split into four teams, and each team was assigned to a neighborhood in New Orleans. We were tasked with getting as many businesses online as we could leading up to Super Bowl XLVII in February 2013.

We started by canvassing our neighborhoods for businesses and working with the business owners to get them on Google Maps and using Google Tools. By February 2013, the CLP had empowered 160 businesses to get online!

As we’ve continued our work, and as the program has expanded, I’ve been able to combine my passion for music with the mission of the CLP. I now lead a team that teaches musicians how to expand their business by empowering them to use internet tools.

Through the work that my team has done with the CLP, the Mayor’s Office of New Orleans approached me to organize a series of presentations and workshops for the musicians of New Orleans to better understand the business of music.

Additionally, while I’ve been involved with the CLP, I’ve co-organized the first two Startup Weekend events in New Orleans, the second of which was a featured as part of Google’s Global Entrepreneurship Week!

The Community Leaders Program has been an amazing opportunity to get involved in the community. The program combines community engagement work with professional development, and gives individuals an opportunity to be a part of something greater than themselves.

Interested in being a Google Community Leader in Harlem during the 2014–2015 school year? Apply today! through the website or on CareerNet, Job ID: 924742. Applications are due by Friday, April 4th, 2014. Please note that participants will be required to commit 10 hours per week to CLP-related work.