Tag Archives: wasserman center

How to “Wow” Your Interviewer

Claudia Enriquez is a second year student receiving her Masters in Public Administration from NYU Wagner. She currently works as a Graduate Program Assistant at NYU Wasserman. She is a New Yorker at heart, growing up in Long Island, then moving to upstate New York to attend college, and now she’s back downstate and enjoying her time at NYU.

You landed the interview, now it’s time to bring out your A game and really ‘wow’ your interviewer. Follow these simple steps below and prepare to land that dream job/internship!

Research, Research, Research

Did I mention research? Check out the company’s website. Review the company’s mission statement, values, culture, goals, achievements, recent events, and the company’s products/services.  If you know anyone who works there – ask him/her to give you the inside scoop!

Practice Makes Perfect…Or at least Preparation!

Be prepared to the job interview. Practice general and challenging interview questions with your peers.  Practice in front of a mirror – don’t be shy! The more prepared you are, the more confident you’ll feel, which will come off during the interview.  While you should practice, be authentic during the actual interview.

NYU Wasserman has plenty of great career resources.  Swing by during walk-in hours for a mini mock interview, or make an appointment with a career counselor. You can find other helpful resources on CareerNet, under the Career Resources tab. Check it out!

Get Ready and Be on Time

The night before do the following:

  • Have your outfit picked out (rule of thumb: dress one or two levels up)

  • Pack your bag

  • Print out extra copies of your resume

  • Get directions to your destination (Check alternative routes)

  • Relax and have a good night’s sleep

The day of the big interview give yourself enough time to arrive. Arrive between 5-7 minutes early. If you’re too early walk around, grab some water, etc. As soon as you walk through the door, all eyes are on you – that means, be polite to everyone, from the receptionist to the person interviewing you.  Remember to put on your best smile!

How to Answer Questions During the Interview?

During the interview make eye contact and answer questions with confidence.  Use the STAR method:

  • Situation – Describe the situation you were in (e.g., the name of the internship or course you were taking)

  • Task – Identify the specific project you were working on and briefly discuss what it entailed

  • Action – This is the most important element! Specifically identify what YOUR action was related to the question that was asked

  • Result – Close the question by stating an outcome to your situation

If you ever find yourself stuck on a question, that’s okay! Say to the interviewer ‘that’s a good question, let me think about it.’ Pause, breathe, think, and then give your answer.

Ask Meaningful Questions

At the close of the interview, the interviewer will always ask if you have any questions for them.  Have about 5-10 questions prepared, but of course, don’t ask questions already answered during the interview.

Below are good examples of what to ask the interviewer.

  1. What qualities do you think are most important for someone to excel in this position?

  2. What do you personally like most about working for this company?

  3. What would be one of the greatest challenges a person in this position would face?

  4. Can you tell me more about the team I’ll be working with?

  5. What are the next steps in the interview process?

Follow Up

Send a thank you email or a letter to your interviewer(s) 24-48 hours after the interview. If you interviewed with more than one person, send tailored individual thank you notes. Reiterate your strengths and your interest in the company. This is also an opportunity to add anything you did not discuss during the interview. As always, thank them for their time and the opportunity.

Good luck!

In Case You Missed It: Day In The Life at Time Inc.

Did you miss a day in the life at Time Inc?  Click on the image below for a recap!

 Follow us on Twitter @NYUWassEmployer for tweets on a day-in-the-life of employees at different organizations. A professional will take over our account for the day and give you live updates about the projects they work on, meetings they attend, and the culture of their office.

Wasserman Cover Letter Best Practices Guide

Writing a cover letter can be a daunting task. Especially for those who’ve never written one. Wasserman’s goal is to help simplify the process with the Wasserman Cover Letter Best Practices Guide.

Download it here: Wasserman Cover Letter Best Practices Guide

Need a little extra assistance with your cover letter? Don’t miss the upcoming webinar, Resumes and Cover Letters that Work (Friday, October 17th, 4:00-5:00pm). RSVP through NYU CareerNet!

 

Alumni Spotlight: Ke Jin

There are a wide variety of careers in hospitality. Through a career in hospitality you can focus on special events, finance, public relations, and more. NYU Tisch Center alumnus Ke Jin earned his Master’s Degree in Hospitality Industry Studies in May 2014 with a concentration in Hotel Finance. He shares a bit about his academic and professional experience on the What’s New Tisch Center blogRead the entire article here

 

ARE YOU ALSO A HOSPITALITY MAJOR? ATTEND THE 2014 FALL HOSPITALITY, TOURISM, AND SPORTS MANAGEMENT CAREER FAIR ON THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30TH. RSVP TODAY!

Meet the Panelists: Arts Professions Panel

Meet the Panelists: Arts Professions Panel, Tuesday, October 21st, 12:30-1:30 with Joe Kluger

On Tuesday, October 21st, the NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development will host an Arts Professions Panel for students who are interested in the arts, design and entertainment industries. One of the panelists for the event will be Joe Kluger, a Principal of WolfBrown. Joe holds an M.A. in Arts Administration from NYU and a B.A. in Music from Trinity College in Hartford.

We asked Mr. Kluger for his personal career advice for students who want to work in the arts. His advice:

  • Do something you are really good at and that matches your strength.
  • Do something you love (i.e. in an art form you’re passionate about).
  • Be clear about what your work parameters and values are.
  • Maintain patience and perseverance in the pursuit of short and long-term career goals that you set for yourself.
  • Remain flexible and open to new opportunities.

Before his consulting career, Joe was the President of The Philadelphia Orchestra Association, where he helped develop the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts and raised over $130 million for endowment. Among many leadership positions he holds, Joe is an internationally recognized expert in the use of technology to accomplish strategic objectives in the arts. He has provided advice in this area to organizations such as the League of American Orchestras and OPERA America and their members.

If you’re interested in the arts, make sure to RSVP for the Arts Professions Panel (Tuesday, October 21st, 12:30-1:30) through NYU CareerNet!

Three Ways To Make The Most Of Your Career Fair

Murshed Chowdhury acts as an advisor to both companies and individuals who are looking for assistance in technology talent acquisition and development. He has served as the CEO & Partner of Infusive Solutions Inc. since its establishment in 2001. Prior to Infusive, he worked at several recruiting agencies where he honed his skills and rose the ranks within the organization before founding his own company.

With over 15 years of technology placement experience, Murshed has helped secure some of the most competitive technical positions for his clients at some of the world’s most prestigious firms. He holds a Bachelors Degree in Political Science from Fordham University.

Murshed is passionate about helping technologists develop themselves both professionally and technically.

Here, he shares valuable insight into achieving career fair success. Think about his tips as you prepare for the next NYU Career Fair.

Recently, our company had a table at a career fair and I noticed that many of the students had a puzzled look on their face. One student caught my attention in particular. I asked her, “What are you looking to do?” This is typical company talk at a career fair, and she responded, “I have no idea, and I really don’t know what I’m supposed to do here.” We then spent the next few minutes discussing what she majored in, but more importantly, what she liked and what interested her.  After that, we came up with a game plan where I told her to visit the various companies that were present to see if they had roles that were closely aligned to what she wanted. I told her to have some real conversations, to get representatives’ business cards and if there was interest, she should follow up. Focus on quality versus quantity, because at the end of the day, you really need one job. You hopefully get many offers, but only need to work at one company. After a few hours, she came back to our booth to tell me that she found some really good prospects, met some really good people and had some genuine conversations.  She went on to say that the career fair was not that intimidating after all, and that, actually, it was kind of fun. She said, from now on, she would make the most of her career fairs and try to use it as a vehicle to further her career.

The career fair for many first time or recurring students can be a daunting task. I remember my first one as a senior in college. You’re told to make a great impression; how exactly is unclear. You’re told to make multiple copies of your resume, dress professionally and go. That’s pretty much the advice I was given.  When I actually walked into the conference hall, I saw a lot of unfamiliar faces, got nervous and wasn’t sure what do next.

So, how do you make the most of your career fair experience? It really comes down to 3 simple steps in my opinion: have a plan, meet (network) and effectively follow up.

PLAN

Like any other successful outcomes, it all starts with proper planning. Do some research once the career services center makes available the list of companies that are visiting your institution. Then, put together a list of the companies you want to meet with and find out where they will be. Some career fairs are so large, they can have companies housed in different buildings.  Map it out and really have a game plan. If you are going with a friend, ask them to split up and see where the crowds are and then come early or stay late to meet with them. The goal is to have some quality conversations, not just say hello and give them your resume. Part of your planning should include research so you can differentiate yourself from the competition. Knowing about what a company does can go a long way in building rapport. As most people ask the quintessential, “What do you do?” question, you are unique when you can walk up to an employer and tell them you are aware of what their business does because you’ve done your homework. I can tell you for a fact, that students who took the time to research my company and me, in some cases, always got more attention from me. Their resumes went to the top of the pile. I’m sure it is no different for other employers as well.  That leads me to my next point, which is, if you have the information on who will be attending from the company, please research them. It shows two things on your part: one, that you’re serious, and two, you are willing to go above and beyond but what most people are willing to do. In today’s digital age of social media and particularly, LinkedIn, that information is readily available.

NETWORK

Next, you should allocate time to meet with as many companies as you can. If you are like most college students, and people for that matter, you’re probably familiar with the big brand companies. But don’t overlook a really great startup or fast growing company that might be perfect for you. There are amazing opportunities at some of these lesser-known brands, as well. Remember, all big brands were small at one point, you never know where this company may go. Also, they wouldn’t be at the career fair if they weren’t growing and looking for great talent like you. Speak to the representatives of these companies and find out what they do. Get their business cards…why, I’ll get to shortly. Be curious and explore, the information you find about these firms, their product and services, can help you narrow down some of your choices, and help you decide what you might be interested in doing once you graduate.

FOLLOW UP

Finally, you need to make sure you effectively follow up. For those companies you’re keen on, send a quick email thanking them for meeting with you and express your interest in the next steps of their process. A week later, follow up with a phone call and reiterate your interest in the firm and/or opportunity. Now, going back to why I asked you to collect those cards, send an email to all the people you met with, even if you’re unsure about the firm or company. Ask them to please forward your information on to anyone they feel may have an interest in your background. Remember, just because that person may not have the ideal role for you at their organization doesn’t mean they don’t have a network of contacts that can be beneficial to you. By making a good impression, and effectively following up, you will already be ahead of your fellow students. Lack of effective follow up is one of the biggest ways to pass on potential opportunities. Most people do a poor job of this. Why? I have no idea, but in any case, this can be an opportunity for you. If you start, you stand to gain. Remember, successful people don’t just focus on doing great things, they make a concentrated effort to do the small things really great, and with consistency. It’s the little things that matter. Keep doing them well and often, and the results will speak for themselves.

Make the career fairs work for you. Remember, they are there to find you, so make the how and why as easy for them as possible.

Put these newly learned skills to good use! Attend the 2014 Fall Hospitality, Tourism, and Sports Management Career Fair! RSVP HERE!

All About NYU Wasserman

SET UP AN APPOINTMENT WITH A CAREER COACH TODAY! VISIT NYU CAREERNET AND SELECT “REQUEST A COACHING APPOINTMENT” ON THE RIGHT HAND SIDE.

Student Recap: Using Your HR Degree to Enhance Your Career – Human Resources Panel

Written by:  Brenda D. Sackerman, Master’s candidate, HRMD Program, 2014

On Friday, September 19, the NYU Wasserman Center at the School of Professional Studies and the NYU SHRM Chapter hosted a panel of NYU alumni who discussed how they used their MS in Human Resource Management & Development to enhance their careers.  The panel consisted of NYU HRMD alumni and students currently working in the HR industry:

Kristen Leising – Managing Director of Talent and Engagement Solutions at Teach for America

Darlene Meier – Director of Human Resources at L’Oreal

Alejandra Olivella – Senior Manager of HR at adMarketplace

Jonathan Serbin – HR Generalist at NYU College of Dentistry

The diverse background and experience of the panelists allowed them to provide excellent insight on how to best leverage your NYU Master’s degree as well as tips for success in the HR field.  Here’s a quick re-cap on the valuable advice they dispensed:

Network, network, network:

Networking is a major key to success.  There are valuable opportunities to build your network constantly around you; don’t overlook the connections you’re making with your classmates.  Additionally, attend as many events as possible and follow through in making connections.  Build genuine relationships and remember to protect your brand and reputation.  Be able to discuss current event, show that you understand business, and get yourself invited into someone else’s world.

Know the basics:

Strengthen your skills in the basic core and administrative aspects of HR, especially if you are near the beginning of your career.  The strategic role that HR plays is extremely important.  However, in order to reach the senior level where strategy alignment is a driving force, most of us will have to move through generalist roles first.  Being well versed in the basics, specifically compensation, benefits and employment law is just as valuable as understanding business strategy.  It is also critical to leverage the skills developed in classes like financial management to discuss figures like ROI and understand valuable metrics and spreadsheets.

Know the business:

HR is the driver of the company culture.  To be successful, you must learn the business, know the industry and establish trust.  Business cannot run without people, but we must be mindful to not be too business or too people focused.  We must build close working relationships through trust and credibility.  A way to build credibility is to apply cost implications for every initiative.  For example, the VP of finance doesn’t want to hear “people are unhappy and unproductive” but would be interested in your ideas to increase revenue.  Another way to learn the business is through rotation programs.  This can increase your marketability and your understanding of the industry.

Diversity is valuable:

Be able to balance who you are, your background and your knowledge.  Be able to leverage your background and find companies who value it as well as recruiters that understand what you can bring to the table.  It is also recommended to take advantage of the Wasserman Center’s assistance in “Perfecting Your Global Brand.”  Diversity is becoming increasingly important as globalization also increases.  Being able to manage inclusion and cultural diversity is a skill that will continue to increase in value.

How to get ahead:

Every day you earn your job but to get a promotion you must go beyond that.  Show that you’ve earned it and that you don’t just expect to be given opportunities.  In addition to networking and looking for opportunities, taking on a new project should help to get you noticed.  Be sure to set a goal and have a business case.  Have an internal mentor as well as an external mentor who will keep you true to your vision.  Have a champion in house that will provide you with support.  Remember, managers execute a plan but directors design the plan.

DON’T MISS OUT ON EVENTS LIKE THIS! SIGN UP FOR THE WASSERMAN STUDENT E-NEWSLETTER BY CLICKING HERE!

 

Profile of a Wasserman Center Internship Grant Recipient

Julie Yoon is a Steinhardt student working as a Multimedia Intern at the Clinton Foundation. As a past recipient of the Wasserman Center Internship Grant, she shares some insight into the value of applying for the Grant, and offers some tips to further your candidacy.

Best part of winning the WCIG: Because my internship was full-time, I knew that it would be difficult to secure a paying job. As we all know, living in NYC is very expensive and the Wasserman Center Internship Grant eased my overall stress and allowed me to focus on my internship.

Most challenging or rewarding part of your internship: Interning at the Clinton Foundation allowed me to continue my commitment to mission-driven media making. One of the most rewarding parts of my internship was working with people who are driven by the same mission that I firmly believe in. It motivated and inspired me everyday while I practiced my editing and visual storytelling skills.

Good advice for others applying for the WCIG: To those who are applying for the Wasserman Center Internship Grant, I would advise to form candid relationships with their mentors or supervisors. Let them know that you are passionate about your internship and that you are there to learn. This will not only show in your application but also in the supervisor’s recommendation.

Non-paying internship survival 101 tip: Live in the moment. Yes, you won’t get paid, but you will learn a lot and discover something new about yourself. Make your experience invaluable!

Are you interning this semester? Whether or not you are getting paid, take Julie’s advice on forming relationships with mentors and supervisors. If your internship is non-paying, and at a not-for-profit organization or within an industry that does not typically pay interns (arts, entertainment, media, education), apply now for the Wasserman Center Internship Grant. Apply here by Sep 30th at 11:59pm: NYU CareerNet Job ID #927342.

Student Perspective: Wasserman Center Connecting with Graduate Students

Mai Huynh is a Master’s student in the Industrial/Organizational Psychology program at GSAS. In case you missed it, below she recaps the Graduate Student Welcome Reception at Wasserman.

This year, the Wasserman Center is making an active effort to connect with graduate students by introducing them to its resources right when they first arrive on campus. On August 28th, the Wasserman Center hosted a Graduate Student Welcome Reception filled with lots of food and information. The idea for the welcome reception came from the creative brainstorming efforts of the Wasserman Graduate Student Advisory Board, a group of student representatives doing the NYU graduate community proud by coming up with amazing ways to professionally develop students.

Over 180 graduates from GSAS, Steinhart, Nursing, School of Professional Studies, and Polytechnic School of Engineering (to name a few) participated in the event. They heard from Richard Orbe-Austin, the new Director of Graduate Student Career Development and learned about how to schedule a career coaching appointment, register for on-campus recruitment (OCR), and sign up for career seminars and events.

During the session, graduate students were given an opportunity to network with their peers and discuss the different roles they play in their life, such as graduate student, son/daughter, city-dweller, etc. The reception concluded with a guided tour of Wasserman’s facilities. Students were ecstatic to find out where they could grab some free coffee. Overall, it was a great day and fantastic way to spread the word about what Wasserman can do for graduate students.

Are you a graduate student at NYU? Take these steps to get connected with our office: