Tag Archives: Wasserman?

Student Perspective: “What’s Next? Entrepreneurship” Panel Discussion Recap

By: Indra N. Kar

Born and raised in Connecticut, Indra N. Kar is a senior in CAS. He is pursuing a B.A. in Economics with minors in Mathematics and Chemistry. In addition to being a Peer in Career at Wasserman, he is involved on campus as the Treasurer of the Medical Dialogue Review and a member of TEDxNYU’s Finance Team.

The “What’s Next? Entrepreneurship” Panel Discussion took place on November 5, 2014 at the new Leslie eLab. It was a very informative program that was organized by Wasserman and co-sponsored by the Entrepreneurship and Innovation Association (EIA) and the NYU Entrepreneurial Institute. As a senior majoring in Economics with an interest in business, I was curious to hear what the panelists had to say regarding startups and the entrepreneurial world.

 

There were three key takeaways from the seminar:

Why to Become an Entrepreneur:

A couple of the panelists worked in the financial services industry prior to creating their own start-ups. In fact, both of them left the industry during the height of the financial crisis to find something where they could control their own destinies. Another panelist was happy to leave his cold-calling job prior to his entrepreneurial endeavors. The three of them expressed a desire to directly observe the results of their work. Whether it was finance or cold calling, they had difficulty seeing the impact they were having on people’s lives. However, by starting their own businesses, they experienced more person-to-person interactions. This allowed them to observe the ways they were affecting individuals’ lives and the influence they were having on the final product. 

Learning from Failure:

The unpredictability of a start-up’s success can lead many to shy away from starting a business. However, the speakers emphasized that failure can teach you several things including your own personal weaknesses, the business strategies that don’t work, and the fact that the best ideas are often organic ideas. 

Furthermore, the majority of the panel believed that the journey and the end result are equally important. Along the way, experience is the best teacher. You can either let past failures discourage you, or you can learn from them and move on. One of the panelists described entrepreneurship as “a state of mind,” which I think nicely captured the emotional aspect of innovation.

Qualities of a Successful Entrepreneur:

Words and phrases that repeatedly came up during the discussion were “risk taking,” “focus,” “curiosity,” and “creativity.” From the discussion, it appeared that the work of a successful entrepreneur is reflective of these four things.

The riskiness of starting your own business is inherent. You are starting something from scratch, often times without a lot of capital in the beginning. In order to secure a significant amount of funding, you need to prove yourself first. You have to find the right business partners, and sometimes, you have student debt to worry about paying off. But, how will you know success if you don’t try?

This is where the risk-taking nature and the ability to maintain focus come in handy for an entrepreneur. The panelists generally agreed that entrepreneurs need to have goals in mind and keep striving until the goals are met. Intellectual curiosity is another source of motivation that they mentioned. It helps jumpstart your creativity, which can help you think on your feet when something doesn’t go as planned. The success of a start-up is not guaranteed, but the panelists believed that the right qualities and right attitude could help you become a successful entrepreneur.

Have you attended or plan to attend one of Wasserman’s events, and would like to be featured on our blog? Let us know! Email us at career.communications@nyu.edu.

4 Golden Rules to Rocking Your Virtual Internship

By Janel Abrahami

Janel Abrahami is a May 2014 graduate of NYU Steinhardt’s Applied Psychology program. She currently serves the NBCUniversal intern population as a Campus 2 Career Assistant and a catalyst for early career development.You can find her talking about all things work on Twitter and LinkedIn

Looking for a flexible way to explore a new industry or pursue a passion while at school? Consider a virtual internship! Check out the NYU CareerNet job board for current openings.

From campus ambassador gigs, to web development co-ops, to editorial spots, virtual internships are as limitless as ever before. These unique positions allow young professionals to gain valuable experience in chosen fields while still maintaining some flexibility in their crazy schedules. They can even be great ways to extend summer internships into the fall semester by doing work remotely from campus!

However, with this flexibility may also come a lack of structure that could derail your progress working away from the office. Heed these golden rules to get the most out of your virtual internship- just add WiFi:

  1. Set clear goals from the beginning: The best way to determine how much progress you’ve made is to measure against a fixed goal. Have a conversation with your supervisor at the start of your internship about what she would like you to accomplish, as well as the company’s goals in general. Keep these handy to reference when working and be ready to…

  2. Schedule regular check-ins with your supervisor: Plan 30-minute calls or skype sessions every month or after each project to get feedback on what what’s working and what can be improved upon going forward. This is a great time to get valuable feedback from your boss, but it’s also a chance for you to be honest about your experience so far and make sure that you are getting the guidance and mentorship you need as well.

  3. Keep track of your deadlines: When school and extracurriculars are also competing for your commitment, it can be easy to lose track of an internship assignment- especially when your boss is not personally there to make sure you get it done. Keep a shared work calendar on Google Drive with your team; break assignments into smaller tasks; set reminders on your phone- however you stay organized and keep your deadlines in mind.

  4. Stay inspired!: A virtual internship should be an organic way to pursue your passion wherever you are. Keep up-to-date on news in your field, subscribe to trade journals, and network with other virtual interns to share ideas and find inspiration when you feel disengaged.

Have you held a virtual internship before? What advice would you add to this list?

Five Things You Need to Do Before You Apply for that Spring Internship

By: Janel Abrahami

Janel AbrahamiJanel Abrahami is a May 2014 graduate of NYU Steinhardt’s Applied Psychology program. She currently serves the NBCUniversal intern population as a Campus 2 Career Assistant and a catalyst for early career development.You can find her talking about all things work on Twitter and LinkedIn

So you found the perfect spring internship and you’re ready to apply! Or are you? Read on to make sure you’ve done these five things before you hit “Submit.”

Know your stuff

A hiring manager can tell immediately if an applicant is familiar with their company or not- and this can make or break their hiring decision. Do your extensive research on the company’s background, its clients, its leaders, its revenue sources- everything that makes a company tick. Not only will you be making a more informed decision about applying to this company (are you actually that passionate about their mission statement?), you will also be able to more effectively express the value you could add to the company in your cover letter or an interview.

Optimize your resume

If you are applying for a position at a large company, chances are high that they use an Applicant Tracking System to accumulate the hundreds of resumes that they receive. These are often referred to as “black holes,” and for good reason- it can be very easy for your resume to fall through the cracks and never see the light of day (or a recruiter’s eyes). But there is hope, and it comes in the form of keyword searches. Recruiters can search through pages of resumes to find those with certain keywords (e.g. “javascript” or “affiliate marketing”). Optimize your resume by including a few keywords from the online job description that are relevant to your experience.

Polish and shine

Once the content of your resume is ATS-friendly, make sure the format is recruiter-friendly. This means one-page of relevant experience, clearly defined sections for education and skills, and appropriate contact information (no email addresses from middle school or embarrassing voice mail recordings!).

Connect the dots

I don’t need to tell you that #networking is one of the best ways to get your foot in the door, but it is something that internship applicants often fumble with. First, use LinkedIn to see if you know anyone connected to the company you’re applying to. Once you’ve found them, either message them through LinkedIn or email them personally (whichever you think would be more appropriate). Briefly tell them that you are applying for X position at Y company, and ask them if they could recommend someone for you to send your resume to. Do not ask them to forward your resume themselves- if they are willing to do this, they will offer in their reply. Once you have a contact at the company, you’re ready to…

Make it personal

….reach out to them with a brief but personalized message expressing your interest in the position. Attach your resume and cover letter, and mention your referee’s name in the first line of your email. Then, relax with the assurance that you’ve already out yourself ahead of other applicants.

Do you have your own application checklist? Is there something else you’d include here? Share with us in the comments.

About On-Campus Recruitment  

On-Campus Recruitment (OCR) is one of the many ways for NYU juniors, seniors, and graduate students to discover job and internship opportunities. Through OCR, employers come to the Wasserman Center to interview students. 

To obtain access to OCR, you must attend both a mandatory OCR Orientation and an Acing the Interview seminar (find upcoming dates and times on NYU CareerNet).

Important Spring Deadlines for On-Campus Recruitment (OCR):
  • The first resume drops for Spring OCR positions begin November 17th
  • First deadline to apply is December 2nd
  • Interviews begin January 20th(the week before classes begin)
Learn more about On-Campus Recruitment by clicking here!

CARE3: Care. Connect. Community

By:  Rama Murali 

Rama Murali (NYU CAS ’00) is the Founder and Director of CARE3 (Care Cubed), a community organization composed of and supporting Family Caregivers in Chennai, India.

I moved to Chennai, India in 2012 to help my mother care for my beloved and beautiful grandmother, who was suffering, with tremendous grace and strength, from the combined effects of a massive stroke and breast cancer. I never thought of myself as a person who would be responsible for the care of another – I was focused on my career in international public health and enjoying traveling the world – but there I was, embarking on the most difficult and rewarding role of my life. It was also a role in which I felt most challenged, most alone, most in need of help.

I am a Caregiver.

Of all the groups I have identified with – a native New Yorker, an Indian- American, a public health specialist, and many more – it was as a Caregiver that I first truly felt the need to connect with others in my group. I understood first-hand the challenges that my family and I faced, and realized there must be others like me out there. I wanted to find my Caregiver community so I was not alone, and so others would not feel alone. I knew there was great potential in convening those going through the same thing and building a safe platform for sharing and support. I had no idea how to do it. Sure, I had worked with communities in health programs; but, those programs were usually part of a project of an external agency with lots of funds and resources to incentivize people coming together. I was not a community organizer. I was not a big name that could draw people. I was not even fully fluent in the local language! So I relied on the thing that made me want to reach out to others– being, and understanding what it is to be, a Caregiver.

Building a Caregiver Community.

Rama Murali

One by one, I visited homes and met with other Caregivers. The understanding that is essential for building strong community programs – to getting people out of their homes and into a new, foreign environment where they can share things they rarely have shared before – came from sharing my experience, speaking the language of my community, and, most of all, listening. It came from months of groundwork, all with the hope of building trust and bringing people together. The experience was incredible: getting a treasured glimpse into other Caregivers’ lives, gaining greater awareness of the central challenges and joys that connected us, and learning so much from each and every Caregiver. I was educated, humbled, and strengthened by each Caregiver’s story. Here I was (a community builder!), part of a growing group of Caregivers being mobilized, becoming empowered, and forming the foundation of a connected community.

I learned that once one people came together, things began to change. I was not alone in wanting to help. The language of individual Caregivers started morphing from “I do not know how to manage some days.” to a group of Caregivers saying “We can help each other.” I learned to let go of my vision of what the community should be, and became more and more open to the shared vision of the community – something more powerful that I had envisioned.

Where are we now?

Eighteen months later, I have connected with almost 200 Caregivers and their families, impacting the lives of over 400 people in Chennai.  We have come together as CARE3 (Care Cubed), the first Caregiver network of its kind in India, and now have two meetings across the city each month. These meetings are the core of our program – allowing Caregivers to connect, while learning about self-care and community support. Some of our activities include: building a crowdsourced resource directory of health care service providers, populated with ratings and comments from Caregivers in CARE3; publishing quarterly newsletters, which include Caregiver stories and articles by members of our community; and, building a larger grassroots community of supporters across the city – including yoga centers, physiotherapy clinics, NGOs, and businesses – who donate space and resources for our meetings and help us keep costs low. Most importantly, WE (no longer me alone) are mobilizing a community that more and more Caregivers are willing to identify with, share ownership of, and take pride in. We are sharing our model freely, hoping that other Caregivers take it up and build such communities across the country. In fact, a Caregiver living in Pune, Maharashtra is starting a similar group using lessons learned from CARE3!

Movements happen from within a community – when those sharing common experiences come together and realize that their collective voice is loud and vibrant. I firmly believe that it all starts with the simple act of reaching out to others, and knowing that connecting with one person at a time can start something that makes a difference to the lives of many.

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If you would like more information about CARE3 feel free to email me at RamaCare3@gmail.com or visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CareCubed. Our website (www.carecubed.org) will be launched on October 13th – so please check there soon for updates and more information!

Meet Rama, hear more about her work, and gain valuable career advice at these upcoming programs:

Meet the Arts Professions Panelists: October 21st, with Cheryl Krugel-Lee, Deena Sami, Katarina Wong and Michael George

On Tuesday, October 21st, the NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development will host an Arts Professions Panel for students who are interested in the arts, design and entertainment industries. Among the panelists will be Cheryl Krugel-Lee, Deena Sami, Katarina Wong and Michael George. 

Cheryl Krugel-Lee

Cheryl Krugel-Lee is a Brooklyn-based composer, arranger, and orchestrator, whose work spans both the commercial and classical worlds. Cheryl earned her Bachelor of Music from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and her Master of Music degree from New York University, where she studied primarily with Ira Newborn. She has composed scores for theatre productions and films, orchestrated for musical theatre, collaborated with choreographers and created numerous works for a concert setting. Cheryl has had her music performed at Carnegie Hall, Jones Hall in Houston, Texas, Dixon Place, and The Actors Temple Theatre. Cheryl’s professional advice for students interested in careers in the arts would be:

    • To pursue their artistic goals.
    • To get involved with the arts administration of an organization as these organizations can offer opportunities from within that might not be available to people not working in that specific environment. On the other hand, in case one decides that he/she is no longer interested in pursuing a purely artistic career, having experience at an arts organization helps later on with other kinds of work.

Deena Sami

Deena Sami is currently an Associate Producer for CNN’s Anderson Cooper 360. Deena graduated with double majors in Journalism and Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies and minored in Politics. She interned anywhere she could get her feet in and gained “real world” experiences that she believes are crucial to landing a job. Deena’s passion for “everything Middle East and Egypt” led her to pursue a thesis on the 2011 Egyptian revolution. On an unrelated note: she’s an (amateur) foodie and started an (amateur) blog chronicling her creations in the kitchen! 

Katarina Wong

Katarina studied Classics and Philosophy at St. John’s College and, until recently, was the Director of Community and Curatorial Engagement at Edelman, the largest global PR firm, where she started their corporate art collection and art gallery as a Curator. Katarina will be launching her new business MADE on 10/16, which is dedicated to making art collecting more social.

Her personal and professional advice to students is:

  • Follow your curiosity even if it leads out of your primary area of specialty.
  • Be generous with your colleagues, whether it’s sharing information, donating your time or being supportive. In fact, on a networking level, artists, freelance designers, and many others in the arts industry are small business owners, so be smart.
  • Be knowledgeable. Don’t shy away from learning about marketing, legal issues that affect your future work (e.g., contracts, consignment agreements), taxes (and deductions!), etc.

Michael George

Michael George is a freelance editorial portrait and travel photographer based in Brooklyn, who graduated with a degree in Photography & Imaging from the NYU Tisch School of the Arts in 2011. Michael currently runs his own business and works for clients such as WIRED, Runner’s World, and Hello Mr. magazine. Mr. George’s career advice for aspiring artists is:

  • To pursue personal projects alongside the work that helps keep financial stability. As you keep your passion alive for the work you really care about, eventually your paid and personal work will be one in the same.
  • Prove your skills to a possible hiring manager. For example, if you want to make travel work, pinch your pennies and travel.
  • Be patient. You will invest a lot and you will often fail, but you have to give yourself the necessary time as every industry forces you into years of paying your dues before you feel like your head is above water. Not everyone is going to be the next Ryan McGinley. Success is a strange mix of luck, networking, and incredibly hard work.

To hear more from these great panelists, make sure to RSVP  for the Arts Professions Panel (Tuesday, October 21st, 12:30-1:30) through CareerNet!

Student Perspectives: Social Media + Networking for the Job Search

by: Lauren Stewart

Lauren S. Stewart

Lauren S. Stewart  is a current 2nd year MPA in Public and Nonprofit Management and Policy candidate, with a specialization in management at NYU’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. Lauren is currently a program assistant for multicultural career programs at NYU’s Wasserman Center for Career Development and an intern at Kenneth Cole Productions in their Corporate Citizenship department. With a passion for philanthropy, corporate social responsibility, and social entrepreneurship, Lauren plans to utilize the skills learned at NYU Wagner to influence society to focus on social responsibility as a top priority within any industry. Lauren is originally from Midlothian, VA and received a B.A. in psychology from The University of Virginia.

I (heart) LinkedIn!

Moving to the big city from Virginia was quite the experience. As plans came together with starting graduate school at NYU Wagner, finding housing in Harlem, and securing a graduate program assistant role at NYU Wasserman, I believed that I was on the fast track to success. I’m sure you’re waiting for the but…

Well, I really was on the fast track to success until I sat in on NYU Wasserman’s annual Business Bootcamp. One of the speakers spoke about the importance of networking and Linkedin. Yea, I had heard of it. I thought it was just for old and established career professionals. I never understood the value in just another Facebook. Yes, I now know that Linkedin and Facebook are completely different! It’s amazing how you underestimate certain tools when you do not truly understand their purpose or their value! When I expressed to my colleagues that I didn’t have a Linkedin, their expressions ranged from shock to pity. They pretty much made me create an account that day and reiterated the opportunity it could bring.

I am now in my second year at NYU Wagner & NYU Wasserman. Linkedin was once a platform that I knew nothing about. Now it has become my favorite social network! Funny right? I enjoy making new professional connections, reading industry articles, and staying up to date with jobs openings so that I can connect friends and family to various opportunities. This semester, I received my first InMail from a recruiter. (InMail = email for Linkedin users for all you novices out there.) She viewed my profile and believed that I would be a great fit for Kenneth Cole’s Corporate Citizenship Department. I will now be an intern in the department this fall thanks to LinkedIn! 

Don’t have a LinkedIn? It’s time to get one!

Want to learn about other ways to network? Attend one of the upcoming Social Media + Networking for your Job Search seminars:

Preparing for OCR Interviews EMPLOYER INSIGHTS Video Series

On-Campus Recruitment (OCR) is one of the many ways for NYU juniors, seniors, and graduate students to discover job and internship opportunities. Through OCR, employers come to the  Wasserman Center to interview students. In addition to participating in OCR, we recommend that you also attend our seminars, apply for positions via NYU CareerNet, attend career fairs, and meet with a career coach to help identify opportunities that are right for you.

This video will give you some insight on how to prepare for OCR interviews!

Want to learn more about On Campus Recruitment? Attend an upcoming OCR Orientation.

To see the full list, search OCR under the “Events” tab on NYU CareerNet

Wasserman Graduate Student Advisory Board

Lei Lei is a second year student in the Master of Science program in Information Systems. He is also a student worker at the Wasserman Center and a member of the Wasserman Graduate Student Advisory Board.  

Lei Lei - Student in the Master of Science program in Information Systems

The Wasserman Graduate Student Career Development Team asked Lei what his favorite things are about the Wasserman Center, and here is what he said:

1. Extremely helpful career coaching (both walk-ins and appointments).

2. Close contact with employers by attending the Employer Information Sessions.

3. Free printing, free coffee, and free place to take a rest (nowhere else on campus can combine these three in one place)!

Want to learn more about the Wasserman Center resources and services for graduate students?

Attend the Graduate Student Welcome Reception at Wasserman! Thursday, August 28th from 9-10:30 am!

The NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development is located at:

133 E 13th St #2, New York, NY

Connect with graduate students from across the university and expand your NYU network at NYU Wasserman’s Graduate Student Welcome Reception! Participants will also learn about the many programs, resources and services that the Wasserman Center for Career Development offers for graduate students. Breakfast will be served. Please RSVP here.

Looking to get more involved? Join the Graduate Student Advisory Board

DEADLINE: September 15th Job ID 942466 (Graduate students only)
The Wasserman Center is in search of outstanding graduate (Master’s and PhD) student volunteers to partner directly with the Wasserman Center team to address the career goals and needs of graduate students across the university.